Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSocial Policy
IN THE NEWS

Social Policy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The office looks like a travel agency, with an open floor plan, wall-to-wall carpeting and oak desks where customers are served politely with a smile. There are no lines of people waiting, and the kids adjourn to an indoor playground. This cheery and efficient office is the local branch of New Zealand's Income Support Unit, the welfare office. Long before Newt Gingrich's "contract with America," New Zealand began audacious experiments with welfare reform and made major cuts as early as 1991.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 8, 2013
Re "Transgender rights," Editorial, May 3 At any given school, transgender kids likely make up a tiny percentage of the student body. Why then should the vast majority be required to accept sharing a bathroom or locker room with a student who "feels at odds" with his or her physical gender? You blithely dismiss the "discomfort" others may feel and cast it as evidence of discrimination. I would never want to see such a student taunted. However, until a transgender person physically becomes the gender that he or she feels we must recognize, physical gender should determine access to bathrooms and locker rooms.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, Washington Post
Ida Russakoff Hoos, a research sociologist who was an early critic of using technology to study social issues, died of pneumonia April 24 at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. She was 94. Hoos became interested in the effects of automation and technology on workers while completing her doctorate in 1959 at UC Berkeley. Her dissertation was later published as "Automation in the Office" (1961).
BUSINESS
March 17, 2008 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Diners in this food-obsessed city are used to exotic offerings such as chili squid salad, risotto Milanese with oxtail ragu and marinated noisettes of venison. But this winter a controversial new item has been showing up in the fine print of menus at some of the hottest restaurants: a surcharge to help pay for worker health insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1990 | ELAINE CIULLA KAMARCK, Elaine Ciulla Kamarck is a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute.
If you go far enough to the left in American politics, you may bump into the right, and there you will find that America is on the verge of a new war on poverty. Leading it are people who never knew each other, let alone talked to one another. Consider the case of Wisconsin state Rep. Annette Polly Williams. Williams, a black, has been poor most of her life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | JOHN A. MOORE, John A. Moore is president of the Institute for Evaluating Health Risks in Irvine, Calif . This article is adapted from a speech delivered to the Health Effects Institute
Risk assessment is a tool used by scientists to evaluate technical data. Proper use of the tool requires scientific knowledge. Since its broad adoption by the Environmental Protection Agency in the mid-1980s, risk assessment in the hands of others unfortunately has become a toy to create uninformed social policy out of rhetoric rather than scientific reason. A recent example is the series of lawsuits in Los Angeles filed by community leaders to halt malathion spraying over urban areas.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas prepares to take his campaign beyond New Hampshire, strategists in both parties are searching for the weak spots in his message--an unusual blend of pro-business views on economics and positions on social policy that Tsongas himself has described as "extremely liberal." The sharpened focus on Tsongas was dramatically illustrated in Sunday's Democratic debate, when he faced a flurry of criticism for his support of nuclear power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1985
The Kondratas article on the numbers game in counting the homeless does a subtle disservice to us all. Though well-reasoned, the author ignores fundamental issues involved in the absurd preoccupation with numbers that is forced upon all of us involved in determining and implementing social policy in this country. Last year, while working on a research on homelessness, my colleagues and I were faced with the same dilemma discussed by Kondratas, namely arriving at an accurate local and national estimate of the extent of this problem defined in numerical terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1993
In his commentary on immigrants ("Latinos Play Role in Realizing Promise of Economic Success," July 11), Msgr. Jaime Soto writes of many exemplary attributes of the Latino community in our midst. Also, a great many of his points covering the economics of the Latino presence are of unquestionable validity. I am in agreement that his five points of social policy are desirable and necessary. In fact, I would even enhance upon them, such as increasing the penalties for employer noncompliance with labor law, increasing the minimum wage for certain position categories, mandating minimum employer-provided benefits and requiring equitable enforcement of present immigration law. So far, so good.
WORLD
October 12, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexican presidential front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador unveiled a board of advisors. The left-wing former Mexico City mayor said retired Supreme Court Justice Juventino Castro would advise on law and order, writer Elena Poniatowska on cultural policy and economist Rogelio Ramirez de la O on economic policy. Also named as advisors were former Tabasco state Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, Washington Post
Ida Russakoff Hoos, a research sociologist who was an early critic of using technology to study social issues, died of pneumonia April 24 at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. She was 94. Hoos became interested in the effects of automation and technology on workers while completing her doctorate in 1959 at UC Berkeley. Her dissertation was later published as "Automation in the Office" (1961).
OPINION
April 7, 2007
Re "Written off," Current, April 1 Chip Ward's article shows us the limits of the so-called pharmaceutical revolution that deinstitutionalized hundreds of thousands of the mentally ill in the 20th century. This "revolution" increased homelessness, created hundreds of privately operated residential and day programs with less than consistent consumer/client care (coupled with budget-constrained state oversight) and is in part responsible for the warehouse function thrust upon the public libraries.
WORLD
October 12, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexican presidential front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador unveiled a board of advisors. The left-wing former Mexico City mayor said retired Supreme Court Justice Juventino Castro would advise on law and order, writer Elena Poniatowska on cultural policy and economist Rogelio Ramirez de la O on economic policy. Also named as advisors were former Tabasco state Gov.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2004 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
In an explicit appeal to female voters, Sen. John F. Kerry argued Wednesday that President Bush's proposal to create private retirement accounts would weaken Social Security and harm elderly women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frank Riessman, 79, a social psychologist and leading advocate of the self-help movement who was also the editor of the journal Social Policy, died March 1 at a nursing home in New York City. The cause of death was Parkinson's disease and diabetes, family members told Associated Press. Born in Manhattan, Riessman graduated from what is now City College of the City University of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989
The editorial "A Major March" (April 11) missed the mark badly when it said, " . . . The (Supreme) court must look beyond legal principle to tenable social policy and good sense. . . ." Wrong, wrong, wrong! That is precisely what it must not do. Deciding what laws make sense and are good social policy are not the constitutional function of the Supreme Court. That power resides in Congress. The proper function of the Supreme Court is to decide, when cases are brought before it, whether the laws written by Congress are constitutional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frank Riessman, 79, a social psychologist and leading advocate of the self-help movement who was also the editor of the journal Social Policy, died March 1 at a nursing home in New York City. The cause of death was Parkinson's disease and diabetes, family members told Associated Press. Born in Manhattan, Riessman graduated from what is now City College of the City University of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Marc Miringoff, 58, a Fordham University educator who created an index that promoted understanding of the nation's social health, died Thursday at his home in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., of undetermined causes. An associate professor of social policy, Miringoff was founder of the Fordham Institute for Innovation in Social Policy. He became known for his development of a report card that measured the national welfare.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Federal Reserve official Wednesday used a Sept. 11 memorial service on Wall Street to excoriate U.S. corporate executives for paying themselves too much and called on the business leaders to cut their own compensation. Quoting the biblical admonition to "love thy neighbor as thyself," William J.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|