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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
A plastic drink dispenser filled with a brilliant green liquid sat on the classroom counter, but no one dared take a sip. The murky water contained goldfish, and a small hose carried its waste into a container full of leafy greens. "It's a self-sustaining aquaponic garden," said Jordan Keligond, a sophomore at Westchester Enriched Sciences Magnet High School, as if it were as common as a toaster. The waste gives off nitrogen for the lettuce to grow, and in turn, the plants provide filtered water back to the fish.
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BUSINESS
December 15, 2013 | By Tanjil Rashid
Like many revolutionary manifestoes, "The Solution Revolution" seeks the overthrow of government as we know it. But for authors William Eggers and Paul Macmillan - who work in public-sector practice at Deloitte - this is a revolution very much in the interests of business, not against it. The book, "The Solution Revolution: How Business, Government and Social Enterprises Are Teaming Up to Solve Society's Toughest Problems," is a compendium of...
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NEWS
July 28, 1989 | From United Press International
Statistics served up at a state meeting on social problems Thursday were so dismal that one speaker prefaced her talk with a warning that it would be "very depressing." Babies are being born addicted to cocaine, homelessness is on the rise, and the state's poverty problem is getting even worse, said Jackelyn Lundy, associate director of the agroecology program at UC Santa Cruz.
NATIONAL
July 6, 2013 | By Peter Slavin
West Virginia is frequently the butt of wisecracks, but it has a champion in Marsha Timpson. She is particularly fond of the people of McDowell County, where she lives, though she couldn't wait to get away when she was young. Other places, she thought, were bound to be more exciting. It would take her time to realize the potential and beauty of the place. Timpson, 59, who grew up in the tiny community of WarriorMine in a family full of coal miners, does not romanticize her state.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
In a move to promote regional empowerment, hub cities have formed an economic development coalition to tackle social problems in the area. Leaders of the eight-city region represented by Bell, Bell Gardens, Commerce, Cudahy, Huntington Park, Maywood, South Gate and Vernon announced the opening of the Southeast Community Development Corp. earlier this month.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II voiced impatience Monday over serious, longstanding economic and social problems in Brazil, urging President Fernando Collor de Mello and his government to solve them without "more delays." Collor, in turn, asked the Pope to use his influence against "injustices" in the relations between rich and poor countries. John Paul arrived in the Brazilian capital Monday evening, two days after beginning a 10-day tour of the world's most populous Roman Catholic country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1991 | TONY PERRY
San Diego County is now officially split into two camps when it comes to seemingly intractable social problems. There are the NIMBYs. Those are the Not In My Back Yard folks who oppose certain things moving into their neighborhood: homeless shelters, migrant housing, halfway houses, trash plants, bus stations, etc. Then there are the MORALLY SUPERIORs.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | PAUL ALEXANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Island nations across the Pacific face environmental threats from outside and social problems at home as they try to meet the future without losing their identity. To the eye, not much has changed in recent decades. Tourists come to escape the rat race. The diving, swimming and sailing are as good as ever in still pristine waters. The landscape is lush, the pace slow and idyllic.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | MARYANN HAMMERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Maryann Hammers writes regularly for The Times
Erin Kandel is too young to drive, vote or buy a lottery ticket, but that doesn't stop her from making the world a better place. The 15-year-old from Encino comforts battered women in shelters, distributes meals to the homeless at soup kitchens and visits residents of nursing homes. She organizes clothing drives for the needy, cleans up graffiti around the community and travels to high schools to talk to students about AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1992 | ANNE BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego Rescue Mission is the latest recipient of President Bush's Point of Light award. Volunteers at the mission, 1150 J St., received notice of the award Tuesday in a letter commending their service to the people of San Diego. The Rescue Mission relies on more than 1,000 volunteers each year to help feed, house or educate as many as 8,000 people every month. A statement from the White House described the volunteers as "those who successfully address our most pressing social problems."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
A plastic drink dispenser filled with a brilliant green liquid sat on the classroom counter, but no one dared take a sip. The murky water contained goldfish, and a small hose carried its waste into a container full of leafy greens. "It's a self-sustaining aquaponic garden," said Jordan Keligond, a sophomore at Westchester Enriched Sciences Magnet High School, as if it were as common as a toaster. The waste gives off nitrogen for the lettuce to grow, and in turn, the plants provide filtered water back to the fish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Taking a cue from TOMS Shoes - in which the company donates a pair of shoes to needy children for every pair bought - the social entrepreneurship class at Environmental Charter School in Lawndale recently came up with ways to do something similar with such everyday items as T-shirts and socks. "What if we make the hoodie reversible to reduce the need to buy more than one," asked Mohamad El Hajj Younes, 17. "And for every one sold, another would be donated to a shelter in the county where they purchased it. " His classmates huddled in groups to develop "for-purpose" business plans, instead of the traditional for-profit and nonprofit models.
WORLD
August 18, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - The mass exodus from southern cities by thousands of panicked Indians returning to their homes in the country's northeast in recent days has underscored deep social fissures in the country, the power of social media and the peril of weak political leadership, analysts said. Hate messages and threats spread on social media last week after violence against northeasterners, sparking fear among tens of thousands from the region who have moved to major Indian cities in search of jobs and education.
OPINION
September 15, 2011 | Doyle McManus
"We have not had the courage to stand up and look Americans in the face," Texas Gov. Rick Perry said when he was asked about Social Security at the Republican presidential candidates' debate this week. "It has been called a Ponzi scheme by many people long before me. But no one's had the courage to stand up and say, 'Here is how we're going to reform it.'" Including, it turns out, Rick Perry. In all the sound and fury over Social Security over the last few weeks, the Texas governor has never actually spelled out how he would fix the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
California voters, by a modest margin, think they should be allowed to grow and consume marijuana, according to a new poll that also found more than 1 in 3 voters had tried pot and more than 1 in 10 had lit up in the past year. The Los Angeles Times/USC poll found that voters back the marijuana legalization measure on the November ballot, 49% to 41%, with 10% uncertain about it. But support for the initiative is unstable, with one-third of the supporters saying they favor it only "somewhat."
OPINION
March 17, 2010
The decomposing bodies of a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent and his pilot are discovered wrapped in plastic bags at a ranch about 60 miles from the Guadalajara streets where they were kidnapped by the cartel controlling drug trafficking in central Mexico. The agent's corpse bears traces of the drugs a doctor administered to keep him alive during some 30 hours of interrogation, as his torturers crushed his jaw, ribs and windpipe, and drilled a hole into his skull. "We are in a war and cannot accept that Enrique Camarena died in vain," the U.S. ambassador says.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In nearly six years as president of Mexico, Carlos Salinas de Gortari has done a masterful job of taming inflation, reducing the nation's budget deficit and attracting international investment. But Salinas' policies have exacted enormous social costs at the same time that Mexico's new respect in the industrialized world and approval of the North American Free Trade Agreement have raised expectations among Mexicans for a better life.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2013 | By Tanjil Rashid
Like many revolutionary manifestoes, "The Solution Revolution" seeks the overthrow of government as we know it. But for authors William Eggers and Paul Macmillan - who work in public-sector practice at Deloitte - this is a revolution very much in the interests of business, not against it. The book, "The Solution Revolution: How Business, Government and Social Enterprises Are Teaming Up to Solve Society's Toughest Problems," is a compendium of...
NEWS
August 30, 2009 | Rachel Metz, Metz writes for the Associated Press.
Chatter about ensuing plans permeates any graduation, though it's not common for the talk to surround which class projects will receive venture capital funding. This was a hot topic at the first commencement at Singularity University, a school that is backed by Google, operates on NASA's Silicon Valley campus and gets its name from co-founder Ray Kurzweil's favorite term for our technologically enhanced future. Founded last year with the idea that rapidly evolving technologies can be harnessed to solve problems like poverty and climate change, Singularity University does not offer a traditional degree -- though it is working to get some universities to accept students' coursework for credits.
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