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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By August Brown
Kanye West may believe he is a god, but somehow Jay Z just upped him in the ontological battle over each's greatness. This particular flame war started in 2012, when singer and longtime civil rights activist Harry Belafonte told the Hollywood Reporter that " I think one of the great abuses of this modern time is that we should have had such high-profile artists, powerful celebrities," he said. "But they have turned their back on social responsibility. That goes for Jay-Z and Beyonce, for example.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By August Brown
Kanye West may believe he is a god, but somehow Jay Z just upped him in the ontological battle over each's greatness. This particular flame war started in 2012, when singer and longtime civil rights activist Harry Belafonte told the Hollywood Reporter that " I think one of the great abuses of this modern time is that we should have had such high-profile artists, powerful celebrities," he said. "But they have turned their back on social responsibility. That goes for Jay-Z and Beyonce, for example.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Taking a cue from TOMS Shoes - in which the company donates a pair of shoes to needy children for every pair bought - the social entrepreneurship class at Environmental Charter School in Lawndale recently came up with ways to do something similar with such everyday items as T-shirts and socks. "What if we make the hoodie reversible to reduce the need to buy more than one," asked Mohamad El Hajj Younes, 17. "And for every one sold, another would be donated to a shelter in the county where they purchased it. " His classmates huddled in groups to develop "for-purpose" business plans, instead of the traditional for-profit and nonprofit models.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
The corner of Pico and Sepulveda boulevards is your standard Westside traffic nightmare, with rush hour commuters inching along at discouraging speeds just blocks from an even more congested 405 Freeway. The intersection, already a subject of bitter conversations among nearby residents, could see thousands more cars each day if the Los Angeles City Council this month signs off on a plan for 638 apartments, a supermarket, new restaurants and possibly a Target store. Backed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the so-called Casden West L.A. project is one of the city's most controversial examples of transit-oriented development - shopping and housing concentrated around a planned Expo Line light rail station.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1987 | WENDY BLATT, Blatt is a Los Angeles free-lance writer specializing in street music, dance music and independent labels
Yo, right now, kick the bass for them brothers and let them know what goes on. --Public Enemy Do you know what time it is? --Kool Moe Dee Pardon the pun, but rap music is getting a bum rap. The swaggering, street-spawned sound has become even more controversial in recent months than that old adult target heavy metal, which was accused of promoting everything from Satanism to drugs.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Hillary Rodham Clinton praised a group of companies this week that pursued social responsibility as well as profit, saying the business world must play "an expanded role in conveying values." Clinton was in New York on Tuesday to honor the recipients of the Business Enterprise Trust awards, which go to companies that have found creative ways to blend good business with concern for social issues.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
A consumer group has rated the makers of Colgate toothpaste, Kellogg's Corn Flakes, Johnson Wax and Wheaties as the most socially responsible companies. At the other end of the spectrum in the third annual edition of "Shopping for a Better World" were Castle & Cooke Inc., producer of Dole Fruits and Sun Giant Raisins, and USX Corp., the steel and energy company.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1997 | MARTHA GROVES
Timing is everything. Just ask Robert D. Haas. Three days before he was to fly to Los Angeles to deliver the keynote speech at the annual conference of Business for Social Responsibility, the company he heads, jeans maker Levi Strauss & Co. of San Francisco, disclosed that it was closing 11 factories and eliminating more than 6,000 positions, or a third of its U.S. manufacturing jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1993
This year in Orange County, a former school administrator and a doctor have acknowledged very painful, public lessons. The word remorse has been much in the news. We are all responsible for our own actions ultimately, but the stories of Stephen A. Wagner, the jailed former chief financial officer of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District, and Dr. Ronald J. Allen of Laguna Beach, facing two second-degree murder charges for the deaths of a couple in a car accident, bring to mind a point.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | HERMAN WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Berlin Wall has fallen. Glasnost reigns. Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev is a Nobel Peace Prize hero. Indeed, many Americans regard the Cold War, as we have known it for more than four decades, as over. And with its demise, that ultimate nightmare--a nuclear wipeout from a Soviet-U.S. showdown--seems no longer a reality. Not so, argue disarmament activists such as Dr. Robert Wesley of Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Taking a cue from TOMS Shoes - in which the company donates a pair of shoes to needy children for every pair bought - the social entrepreneurship class at Environmental Charter School in Lawndale recently came up with ways to do something similar with such everyday items as T-shirts and socks. "What if we make the hoodie reversible to reduce the need to buy more than one," asked Mohamad El Hajj Younes, 17. "And for every one sold, another would be donated to a shelter in the county where they purchased it. " His classmates huddled in groups to develop "for-purpose" business plans, instead of the traditional for-profit and nonprofit models.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
I love love. When it comes to Valentine's Day, though, I'd rather skip the whole ordeal and enjoy a date night with my husband on any other night in February. The only thing more dreadful than prix fixe Valentine's meals are the restaurants packed with people slogging through multi-course dinners on forced dates. Almost as bad: Gaudy bouquets with baby's breath. And a close runner-up: Hallmark's tacky version of hearts. “Succumbing in haste to the pressure to be romantic and generous because one holiday dictates we should act this way hardly honors a true and enduring relationship,” writes Iris Krasnow on the Huffington Post.
SPORTS
January 28, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Matt Hughes, a two-time UFC welterweight champion, announced his retirement from competition and has joined the organization's front office as vice president of athlete development. “Hughes will be an invaluable resource for UFC athletes,” said Lawrence Epstein, the UFC's chief operating officer. “Leveraging the background and expertise he gained over a Hall of Fame career, Hughes will be dedicated to providing guidance on a wide range of issues athletes face inside and outside of the octagon.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
American corporations plainly are smarting from the accusation that they've abandoned their sense of social responsibility in pursuit of higher profits. You can tell that by the defensive indignation with which the business community has greeted President Obama's rhetorical attacks on "millionaires and billionaires. " And by Bank of America's defensiveness in spinning the cancellation of its $5 debit card fee as rather an act of consumer altruism. ("We have listened to our customers very closely," a spokesman said.)
WORLD
August 26, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
On a map, you can draw a razor-straight line directly north from London's gleaming financial district, known as the City, to the neighborhood of Tottenham six miles away, the epicenter of the riots that flared throughout England this month. But as Britons recover from the worst civil disturbance to hit their country in a generation, many are asking whether another line connects the two communities: a moral decay that runs through British society from top to bottom. The looting, arson and violence that killed five people sparked outrage over a "feral" underclass of mostly inner-city youths who gleefully plundered shops and destroyed livelihoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Gary Chapman, a visionary thinker on the impact of technology and computers on society who helped shape the study of the field as it became a force in modern life, has died. He was 58. Chapman, who was a professor at the University of Texas at Austin, died Dec. 14 of a heart attack while on a kayaking trip in Guatemala, his family said. He was "one of the early individuals writing and doing research on technology policy," specifically Internet policy, ethics and the role of the government and Internet in technology, said Sherri Greenberg, a collaborator who is the university's interim director of the Center for Politics and Governance at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
Considering her church involvement and familiarity with religious thinkers, Hillary Clinton may turn out to be a kind of theologian-in-residence among the new occupants of the White House. She's done some occasional lay preaching, a time-honored role in her Methodist tradition, and has perused works of some of the century's theological giants. These characteristics emerged in conversations with church and educational associates in her native Illinois.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | LOU COHAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Academy Awards time again and, as Elvis once said, I can feel my temperature risin'. Do you recall last year that some of the Academy Awards show organizers got upset when Tim Robbins and Susan Sarandon made impromptu political statements on behalf of 266 HIV-positive Haitian refugees being held by the U.S. military in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba? Or that Richard Gere upset some people when he used the occasion to speak out about human rights abuses in China?
OPINION
November 26, 2010 | By Michael D'Antonio and John Gerzema
In days of yore ? think pre-2005 ? retailers fired a salvo of price cuts on the Friday after Thanksgiving and shoppers raced to spend billions on holiday gifts. The day was originally nicknamed Black Friday by police officers who dreaded the traffic jams, bumper thumping and misdemeanors that arise when so many people converge on shopping districts and malls. Eventually the term came to describe the start of the period when retailers see profits for the year and a kind of retail gluttony so divorced from the true spirit of the season that it made all but the most benumbed consumers feel conflicted, if not ashamed, of the excess.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Thanksgiving is here, which means that we are now on the cusp of the giving season. Or is it the marketing- of-giving season? You are about to be inundated with corporate pledges to donate X dollars to a good cause for every Y dollars you spend with them or every Z product you buy. Some companies ? American Express, for instance ? even allow you to vote on which charities should be so endowed. This is known as "cause-related marketing. " It's inescapable at yuletide, but it has become so essential an element of all consumer marketing that it's hard to avoid year-round.
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