Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSocial Safety Net
IN THE NEWS

Social Safety Net

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1986 | ROBERT KUTTNER, Robert Kuttner is economics correspondent for The New Republic, and author of "The Economic Illusion" (Houghton Mifflin 1984).
Shortly after the election, the Reagan Administration will unveil its version of an efficient poverty program. The idea is that poor people get too much money from various levels of government. The Administration's welfare officials reportedly want a poverty-level ceiling--$10,990 for a family of four--on the amount of total government assistance that any needy household can get. Charles D.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 11, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Richard Simon, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama laid out his vision Wednesday for $3.78 trillion in federal spending, unveiling a budget proposal for the next fiscal year that aims to reignite cooled deficit reduction talks while opening negotiations over the fate of hundreds of federal programs. Obama's budget would provide $130 million sought by Los Angeles to help extend the subway to the Westside and build a downtown tunnel to link the Gold Line from Pasadena and East L.A. to the Blue Line from Long Beach and the Expo Line from Culver City.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1992 | JEFFREY R. GATES and ROBERT L. WOODSON Sr., Jeffrey R. Gates, president of a Washington-based consulting firm, was formerly counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance. Robert L. Woodson Sr. is founder and president of the National Center for Neighborhood Enterprise in Washington. and
Now that the search has begun for solutions to our long-festering urban ills, it's time for policy-makers to talk straight about what is required. We know a great deal about what does not work. But urban policy is sadly adrift when it comes to devising remedies for problems that have been decades in the making. Among the many remedies that we now know do not work are welfare and social services, in all of their various forms and disguises. We cannot buy our way out of poverty.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A top Democrat pressured fellow progressives Tuesday to consider long-term changes to the social safety net, even as the party digs in for a fight to save Medicare and other government programs from deep budget cuts. As closed-door talks continue with the hope of a year-end deal, President Obama will travel to a Pennsylvania toy store this week to pressure Congress to extend the expiring tax cuts for the middle class, while letting those for the wealthiest 2% of Americans expire.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guenter Pfeiffer has traveled the corporate-restructuring route before, and he knows it's a bumpy road. Pfeiffer recalls when four years ago, at the trough of the last German recession, strategic planners at Daimler-Benz, the parent company of the Dornier airplane factory where he works, "came for the first time with their big scythe." They cut 1,000 of his colleagues from the payroll.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
While pledging to continue economic reforms, new Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov said he will try to make them easier on impoverished Russians by restoring the social safety net and paying overdue wages. "We cannot conduct reforms that affect the people adversely," Primakov said at a Cabinet meeting. "If therapy drags out for decades, and no gleam of light is seen, it is certainly not in the interests of the country, not in the interests of the people."
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The welfare reform plan drafted by House Republicans would reduce assistance to the poor by $57 billion over four years and deny benefits to half the families and children that receive aid under current law, according to a detailed analysis by a Washington-based advocacy group.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Fransen was clinically dead the moment he was born four years ago in a hospital near Amsterdam. His heart had stopped beating during his birth--the fault of the hospital, according to his parents--and even though he was revived, he suffered brain damage that prevents him from standing, sitting or even crawling. Terrible though Ron's tragedy was, the Dutch social security system helped his family make the best of it.
OPINION
February 14, 2006
Re "A Solution for Solvency Need Not Be Radical, Just Bipartisan," Feb. 12 It is evident that Ronald Brownstein will not need Social Security or Medicare. Otherwise, he wouldn't claim that the ridiculous idea of raising the age of eligibility for Social Security by indexing it to the increase in life expectancy has merit. Just because a male may live to 78 or 79 does not mean he will be capable of working at the job he had in his 40s. This is just a trick to rob Americans of money that is rightfully theirs.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A top Democrat pressured fellow progressives Tuesday to consider long-term changes to the social safety net, even as the party digs in for a fight to save Medicare and other government programs from deep budget cuts. As closed-door talks continue with the hope of a year-end deal, President Obama will travel to a Pennsylvania toy store this week to pressure Congress to extend the expiring tax cuts for the middle class, while letting those for the wealthiest 2% of Americans expire.
OPINION
April 18, 2011
Recipe for success Re "L.A. can't escape TV chef's drama," April 14 Kudos to former Los Unified School District Supt. Ramon C. Cortines for standing up to TV chef Jamie Oliver and not allowing him into our school's kitchens. For reality TV shows to work — and I used the term "reality" very loosely — there always has to be a villain. Guess who that would have been? L.A. Unified efficiently serves tens of thousands of nutritious lunches each day. There are choices of entrees, they come with fruit and vegetables, not candy or soda, and most of the meals cost less than a dollar.
OPINION
July 20, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
Rep. Paul D. Ryan's wonky manifesto "A Roadmap for America's Future" is not what most would call thrilling reading. It makes one want to shout, "Nobody told me there would be math!" Charts battle tables for supremacy over bullet points. But it is an exciting document nonetheless, because it offers something many of us yearn for: a do-over. The Wisconsin Republican's Roadmap is not a "reactionary" document, as the left usually describes most anything that involves substantially reducing the size, scope and cost of government.
OPINION
May 11, 2008 | Roger Lowenstein, Roger Lowenstein is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine. His new book, "While America Aged," was published this month.
Recently, i heard three European journalists express astonishment at the primitive state of America's social safety net. "Do you have private pensions?" they asked. The system is unraveling, I explained. "Healthcare?" Some folks get it, some don't. "Public pensions?" Vastly underfunded. When I mentioned that Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama are touting innovative ideas for government savings plans, in the form of a national 401(k) -- the journalists harrumphed.
OPINION
February 14, 2006
Re "A Solution for Solvency Need Not Be Radical, Just Bipartisan," Feb. 12 It is evident that Ronald Brownstein will not need Social Security or Medicare. Otherwise, he wouldn't claim that the ridiculous idea of raising the age of eligibility for Social Security by indexing it to the increase in life expectancy has merit. Just because a male may live to 78 or 79 does not mean he will be capable of working at the job he had in his 40s. This is just a trick to rob Americans of money that is rightfully theirs.
OPINION
December 14, 2003 | William Schneider, William Schneider, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a CNN political analyst.
The Bush presidency is a high-wire act. The Democrats are the party of the safety net. That's the script for the 2004 campaign. But a race between Howard Dean and George W. Bush, which looks increasingly probable now that Al Gore has endorsed Dean, may not follow the script. Bush is certainly a president who takes risks. And shows nerve in the face of criticism. His tax cuts were a huge economic risk. And a political risk too.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1999 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
"Retirement" at the turn of the last century was hardly something many people could look forward to with pleasure. In those days, you worked until you physically couldn't. If you hadn't saved enough to support yourself in retirement, you moved in with the kids. Old age and poverty often went hand in hand. That began to change with President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal.
OPINION
April 18, 2011
Recipe for success Re "L.A. can't escape TV chef's drama," April 14 Kudos to former Los Unified School District Supt. Ramon C. Cortines for standing up to TV chef Jamie Oliver and not allowing him into our school's kitchens. For reality TV shows to work — and I used the term "reality" very loosely — there always has to be a villain. Guess who that would have been? L.A. Unified efficiently serves tens of thousands of nutritious lunches each day. There are choices of entrees, they come with fruit and vegetables, not candy or soda, and most of the meals cost less than a dollar.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have become a fixture of our metropolitan landscape. These men and women loiteron street corners with cardboard signs, scrawled by hand, that simply say: "I will work for food." This sight is relatively new, experts say. The first "street workers" began appearing throughout the city two or three years ago. Many are homeless, and their number appears to be growing, according to organizations that deal with the poor in Los Angeles County.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 years, Claudia and her husband have worked as fruit packers in Washington's abundant apple orchards. Since slipping illegally across the border from Mexico, they have had three sons and acquired a car, two houses--and a neighborhood full of memories. Last week, however, a decade in suburbia careened into a wall when Claudia's boss at the Monson Fruit Co. called her in and told her that an Immigration and Naturalization Service audit had found her documents were forged.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
While pledging to continue economic reforms, new Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov said he will try to make them easier on impoverished Russians by restoring the social safety net and paying overdue wages. "We cannot conduct reforms that affect the people adversely," Primakov said at a Cabinet meeting. "If therapy drags out for decades, and no gleam of light is seen, it is certainly not in the interests of the country, not in the interests of the people."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|