Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSocial Science
IN THE NEWS

Social Science

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
English and history teachers at two Orange Unified School District high schools will try to buck the reduced class-size trend tonight in an effort to help more students. By combining English and history into one interdisciplinary block, the teachers at El Modena and Canyon high schools said that adding a few more students to their 20-member classes will give an academic boost to all. Long before Gov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg's "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead" doesn't officially publish until next week, but it has already stirred controversy across the media, rallying both critics and defenders to its cause, and resulting in a backlash to the backlash.   The book, which Sandberg describes as "a sort of feminist manifesto," discusses the need for more women in powerful positions.  As Sandberg writes, “A truly equal world would be one where women ran half our countries and companies and men ran half our homes.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | LEE DEMBART
Culture and Truth: The Remaking of Social Analysis by Renato Rosaldo (Beacon Press: $21.95; 253 pages) The social sciences, as their name implies, are modeled on science. They seek to gather impartial, objective facts and use them to discover the laws of social organization, just as physicists try to discover the laws of nature. Until recently, this attitude was pervasive in anthropology, which went out to study other cultures from a "neutral" or "objectivist" perspective.
OPINION
July 12, 2012 | By Timothy D. Wilson
Once, during a meeting at my university, a biologist mentioned that he was the only faculty member present from a science department. When I corrected him, noting that I was from the Department of Psychology, he waved his hand dismissively, as if I were a Little Leaguer telling a member of the New York Yankees that I too played baseball. There has long been snobbery in the sciences, with the "hard" ones (physics, chemistry, biology) considering themselves to be more legitimate than the "soft" ones ( psychology, sociology)
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | DAN LOGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Exercise can bring more changes to your life than just engorged biceps, slab-sided thighs and a washboard abdomen. The right movements--done properly and consistently--could change your personality, says James Gavin Ph.D., a professor of applied social science at Concordia University in Montreal. He calls this "Movement Therapy." "Change the way you move, and you change your personality," Gavin says. "I don't think the mind and body are neatly separated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- As the battle over same-sex marriage makes its way through California's courts, another gay rights fight is smoldering in the Legislature. Democratic lawmakers have revived a plan to require state schools to teach about the contributions of gay, lesbian and transgender Americans. They are reigniting a movement that halted five years ago when legislators approved such a requirement only to run into opposition from then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Now, with a Democrat in the governor's office, the lawmakers and gay rights activists are more hopeful that school curricula will be revised.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
Dr. Michael Gose has been named the new chairman of the social science/teacher education division at Pepperdine University. Gose, an associate professor of education who has been teaching at Pepperdine since 1980, will replace Dr. Clarence Hibbs, who will devote his time to teaching and research.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County eighth-graders fared worse on the 1992 California Assessment Program tests than they did two years ago, but they still outperformed their peers around the state, according to results released today by the state Department of Education. The average CAP score for Orange County middle school students was 282, compared to a statewide average of 259.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2000
I was bemused to learn from Deal Hudson ("Catholics and the GOP: an Uneasy Fit," Commentary, Jan. 23) that I am an "old Catholic left-winger." Leaving aside Deal's ageism, I wonder how a Daley Democrat from Chicago can be a left-winger. On consideration, however, I understand that in Deal's hysterical demonology, all Daley Democrats from Chicago are probably left-wingers. ANDREW M. GREELEY Professor of Social Science University of Chicago
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1995 | CATHERINE SAILLANT
Two new textbooks adopted by the state for history and social science classes are on display for public review in Camarillo. "Ancient World 2000," aimed at sixth-graders, and "A History of US" for grades five and eight are available for inspection indefinitely in the Education Services Center of the Ventura County superintendent of schools office at the Camarillo Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
UC Irvine is home to a new $12.5-million research center funded by chip maker Intel Corp., the company announced Tuesday. The center, called the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, applies social science and humanities to the design and analysis of digital information. It opened June 1 but was announced Tuesday by Justin Rattner, Intel chief technology officer, in San Francisco. "Technology is profoundly entangled with our everyday lives. As researchers, we can't get a handle on what's going on by looking at technical factors alone," said UC Irvine professor Paul Dourish, who will co-lead the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
When Christina Kondos receives her bachelor's degree at Caltech's commencement Friday, she will represent a tiny and little-known minority at the prestigious science and engineering campus in Pasadena. Kondos is the only one in her graduating class of 247 to have majored in humanities or social sciences - economics and history in her case - without double-majoring in science, math or engineering. Since 2008, only a dozen Caltech students have done the same, and they received bachelor of science degrees because Caltech doesn't offer a bachelor of arts, campus officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2012 | Ramie Becker
Like a mind-expanding twist on TED Talks served with Burning Man-informed alt-culture, L.A.'s monthly mix of science, art and socializing known as Mindshare has drawn steadily increasing numbers since its inception in 2006. Now, with 50 events since the first gathering, the minds behind Mindshare are throwing a weekend-long celebration at Lot 613 downtown. Whether viewed as a night of mindful debauchery, a cultural salon with sex appeal, or a booze-filled bacchanal that stimulates the cerebral cortex, there's no denying the Mindshare events have made their mark on the city's social scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
A UC Berkeley freshman orientation program triggered national debate last year when it asked new students to send in saliva samples for voluntary DNA testing for three dietary traits. The goal was to spark getting-to-know-you discussions about medicine and ethics, but privacy concerns and other problems derailed parts of the plan. This summer, UC Berkeley is asking new students to submit a less controversial part of themselves: Their voices and accents. The university's welcome-to-campus seminars in the fall will focus on linguistic diversity and the many cultural, scientific and psychological aspects of language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- As the battle over same-sex marriage makes its way through California's courts, another gay rights fight is smoldering in the Legislature. Democratic lawmakers have revived a plan to require state schools to teach about the contributions of gay, lesbian and transgender Americans. They are reigniting a movement that halted five years ago when legislators approved such a requirement only to run into opposition from then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Now, with a Democrat in the governor's office, the lawmakers and gay rights activists are more hopeful that school curricula will be revised.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Judith Merkle Riley, a longtime associate professor of government at Claremont McKenna College and the author of internationally bestselling historical novels, has died. She was 68. Riley died of ovarian cancer Sept. 12 at her home in Claremont, said her daughter, Elizabeth Riley. Riley, who taught under her maiden name, joined the government department faculty at Claremont McKenna College and the faculty of Claremont Graduate School in 1982. She taught organization and management, public and comparative administration, political ideologies, and healthcare and public policy.
NEWS
July 23, 1999
In California, almost 4.2 million public school students in grades 2 through 11 took the Stanford 9 standardized tests this spring--for the second year in a row. All of them were tested in reading, math and writing. Students through grade 8 also took a spelling test, and students in higher grades took exams in science and history/social science. In this section, The Times presents scores from selected testing subjects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1985
Scott Warren must be making a jest in his article, "Marx and the Student Mind" (Editorial Pages, Dec. 18) when he portrays Marxism as a lively, questioning jester versus the stodgy, dogmatic "priests" who demand orthodoxy. Anyone the least bit familiar with the views of social science professors today knows that this priesthood is, as a whole, far closer in spirit and mode of analysis to Marx than to any other single thinker. Warren himself gives us an example of such priesthood thinking and how it can lead to political and moral disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2010 | James Rainey
Revenue plummets right along with dreary circulation. Time slashes its staff. Newsweek hovers near extinction. Survival and stable footing seem assured only for the frothiest and most specialized magazines. Yet one woman looks into this bleak media sea and sees an opportunity, if not to make money, to fill a void with serious, solutions-oriented journalism. The result is Miller-McCune, a bimonthly journal that focuses on social issues and public policy with the same passion that supermarket glossies lavish on "Biggest Loser" photo spreads and Heidi Montag's latest turn under the plastic surgeon's knife.
OPINION
January 7, 2007 | Richard Dawkins;Max Tegmark;Jonathan Haidt;James O'Donnell;Steven Pinker;Jean Pigozzi;Jared Diamond;J. Craig Venter;Roger Highfield
EVERY YEAR SINCE 1996, the online salon Edge has e-mailed a question to scientists and thinkers about the state of the world. This year's question was: "What are you optimistic about?" Below are excerpts of some of the responses. For full responses (and those of other contributors), go to www.edge.org.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|