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BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
My Sunday column comparing private philanthropy and government social programs has revived the old debate over who is more charitably inclined, conservatives or liberals? Skipping to the last page of the story first, the answer is neither: As two MIT political scientists determined in a 2013 paper , the inclination to give appears to have virtually no relationship to one's partisan or ideological views. There are distinctions, however, in the kind of giving between the two poles.  First, some context.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
My Sunday column comparing private philanthropy and government social programs has revived the old debate over who is more charitably inclined, conservatives or liberals? Skipping to the last page of the story first, the answer is neither: As two MIT political scientists determined in a 2013 paper , the inclination to give appears to have virtually no relationship to one's partisan or ideological views. There are distinctions, however, in the kind of giving between the two poles.  First, some context.
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NEWS
October 16, 1994 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
No one talks about it. But beneath a landscape dominated by crime, immigration and welfare reform, politics in California this year is riven by a silent fault line. Race. None of the candidates overtly appeal to prejudice. Everyone denies even suggesting racial themes. But social scientists believe the undercurrent is implicitly there, looming large from the anti-illegal immigrant Proposition 187 to the emphasis on crime that has recently dominated the governor's contest.
HEALTH
November 10, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
Few things could be less cool than conducting a scientific study on what it means to be cool, but that didn't stop a group of researchers from facing the question down anyway. Their study, "Coolness: An Empirical Investigation," developed from what sounds like a barroom debate. "One day, a friend of mine was trying to figure out if Steve Buscemi was cool," said Ilan Dar-Nimrod, an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. "We couldn't seem to agree, so being the social scientist geeks that we are, we decided to take it upon ourselves.
OPINION
July 31, 2003
Investors can be so frighteningly on the money in predicting things like elections that, in theory, setting up a commodity-style market in which participants helped generals anticipate terrorist attacks, coups and turmoil might have harnessed the force of greed for the U.S. good. But a Bush administration plan to do so, one that officials pledged Tuesday to "terminate," was unbelievably stupid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1991
Re "Peace Activists Plan to Do More Than March," Ventura County edition of The Times, Jan. 14, 1991: Why is it that the minute there is a statement by our government on broad national policy or national goals, there is inevitably that group of self-styled experts who immediately proclaim their opposition to the announced goals and/or the proposed course of action? This perennial mix of educators, social scientists, career negative activists and devout naysayers--each in their own peculiar egomaniacal state--cry out that they are wiser and capable of better solutions than the professionals.
OPINION
April 1, 1990
I was extremely interested in the article with statistics on the death penalty. How can the social scientists say that the death penalty is not a deterrence when we haven't had an execution in 23 years? Now Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp predicts it will be at least another year before the next execution. What good is the death penalty if it is not used? Let's have an execution every week for 52 weeks. This will not only bring the crime rate down but will save our taxpayers a lot of money to house these criminals and pay for their attorney fees.
OPINION
July 14, 2012
Re "No respect in the academy," Opinion, July 12 What makes mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and geology true sciences are their objective and universal natures. Timothy D. Wilson focuses on the ability to conduct "controlled experiments," but scientific concepts like biological evolution that do not render themselves to much experimentation are still well established because they can systematically explain all the observations in the field. The true criterion of science is lack of subjectivity, resulting in universally applicable facts - which are consistent with all future observations, whether or not "controlled experiments" are involved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989
Will argues that we ought to use the term evil to describe a recent gang attack in Central Park. He accuses social scientists and liberals of diffusing responsibility by describing the broad cultural and social forces that contribute to sociopathic behavior--and he certainly cited some sloppy thinking to make his point. But the Christian concept of "evil" is much broader than any defined by social scientists; it is often used to describe forces with cosmic dimensions. Will wants us to apply the concept of evil to individual actions--to focus attention on the evildoers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1987
There is no reason in the world that Martin Luther King Way should have been changed back to Market Street. All the rhetoric about Market Street being traditional etc. was a smoke screen. For me, it is an indication that racism is alive and well in San Diego and America, contrary to the theories of these social scientists. I have lived in this city all my life and took a certain amount of pride that San Diego had such an important street named after Martin Luther King. The struggle for equality is a difficult and sometimes dangerous endeavor, and King, possibly more than anyone in modern history, exemplified this struggle.
SCIENCE
September 24, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Humans have a well-known bias toward good news, often at the expense of reality. This bias, which social scientists call the "good news/bad news effect," has been blamed for events as diverse as the recent financial crisis, our often-poor preparation for natural disasters and, more generally, the pervasive human trait of optimism. In a new study, however, scientists have figured out a way to dampen that optimism: By turning off a certain part of the brain believed to play a role in how we balance good and bad news.
OPINION
July 14, 2012
Re "No respect in the academy," Opinion, July 12 What makes mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and geology true sciences are their objective and universal natures. Timothy D. Wilson focuses on the ability to conduct "controlled experiments," but scientific concepts like biological evolution that do not render themselves to much experimentation are still well established because they can systematically explain all the observations in the field. The true criterion of science is lack of subjectivity, resulting in universally applicable facts - which are consistent with all future observations, whether or not "controlled experiments" are involved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
James Q. Wilson, a social scientist who helped launch a revolution in law enforcement as the co-inventor of the "broken windows" theory — the idea that eradicating graffiti, public drunkenness and other signposts of community decay was crucial to making neighborhoods safer — died Friday in Boston. He was 80. The cause was complications of leukemia, according to his son, Matthew Wilson. Often called the "father of community policing," Wilson, who taught for many years at UCLA and Pepperdine University, was a widely admired public intellectual who wrote more than two dozen books on American government, criminal justice and moral issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Foster Washington knows the odds are against him. The Los Angeles Southwest College student is a 20-year-old from a tough neighborhood in Watts where, he says, there was little encouragement or preparation for college. Recent studies suggest that students such as Washington are the least likely to stay in school, get a degree or transfer to a four-year university, hampering their future job prospects. But Washington is determined to be the first college graduate in his family of 12 siblings.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Americans may think the country is deeply polarized politically, but that perception is incorrect, social scientists reported Friday at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology in San Diego. Researchers examined survey data from the American National Election Studies conducted among adults from 1948 through 2008. The findings suggest that people aren't any more polarized today than they were decades ago. But both Democrats and Republicans tend to overestimate the size of the gap between the parties.
OPINION
July 12, 2011 | By Robert Muggah and Athena Kolbe
Since the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, there have been at least 60,000 civilian deaths that wouldn't otherwise have occurred. Or maybe that number is closer to 650,000. Between 1998 and 2004, 5.4 million people died in a war and its aftermath in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Or was it one-fifth that number? In Haiti, fewer than 46,000 people were killed in the January 2010 earthquake. Or perhaps the death toll was more than 300,000. The science of measuring mortality and morbidity is controversial.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Americans may think the country is deeply polarized politically, but that perception is incorrect, social scientists reported Friday at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology in San Diego. Researchers examined survey data from the American National Election Studies conducted among adults from 1948 through 2008. The findings suggest that people aren't any more polarized today than they were decades ago. But both Democrats and Republicans tend to overestimate the size of the gap between the parties.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
The words "normal" and "divorce" don't show up together very often. But USC sociologist Constance R. Ahrons says it's about time they did. Instead of defining divorce in the traditional negative terms--failed marriages, broken homes--she said we should see it for what it is: a valid societal institution. "Divorce in our society is as much an institution as marriage," Ahrons said Saturday at the USC-sponsored Orange County Academic Symposium at the Irvine Hilton and Towers, "so it's best for us to normalize it and help people find ways to do it better.
SCIENCE
March 5, 2011 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
Ever get the feeling that a thumbs-up on Facebook just isn't the same as seeing a friend? Ever feel like you want more than 140 characters from someone? Author and social scientist Sherry Turkle, in her newest book, "Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other," explores our growing tendency to rely on technology above human interactions. The first part of the book focuses on robots ? why we would use them, and how it could be dangerous to allow robots to replace human interaction.
OPINION
July 31, 2003
Investors can be so frighteningly on the money in predicting things like elections that, in theory, setting up a commodity-style market in which participants helped generals anticipate terrorist attacks, coups and turmoil might have harnessed the force of greed for the U.S. good. But a Bush administration plan to do so, one that officials pledged Tuesday to "terminate," was unbelievably stupid.
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