Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSocial Security Reform
IN THE NEWS

Social Security Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
November 9, 2004
So President Bush wants to reform the Social Security system by exposing the retirement benefits to the risk of the stock market. I don't think so! If he wants to reform retirement benefits, how about the Washington legislators who get 100% of their salary plus cost-of-living increases after serving only one term. That is something that needs fixing. Bernie Cutler Van Nuys
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 1, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
The bipartisan debt commission issued its final report Wednesday, warning that without the sacrifices it calls for, a fiscal "reckoning will be sure and the devastation severe. " Based on an initial blueprint offered Nov. 10 by the panel's co-chairmen, former Republican Sen. Alan Simpson and former Clinton administration chief of staff Erskine Bowles, the budget blueprint outlines steps that, when taken together, would slash the federal deficit by $828 billion by 2015. "Even after the economy recovers, federal spending is projected to increase faster than revenues, so the government will have to continue borrowing to spend," the report states.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 7, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Maybe the most important question facing the Social Security reform commission President Bush appointed last week is deciding which question to ask. All signs suggest that the commission is asking: What's the best way to implement Bush's campaign proposal to restructure Social Security so that workers rely more on the stock market to fund their retirements? But alternately, the commission could ask: What sort of Social Security reform could attract bipartisan support in Congress and the country?
NATIONAL
September 21, 2008 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
Barack Obama made the calamity on Wall Street the central theme of his case against John McCain on Saturday, invoking the crisis to pound his rival on Social Security, healthcare and government reform. The scope of Obama's argument demonstrated how the biggest financial bailout since the Great Depression has shifted the terms of debate in the White House contest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
J.J. "Jake" Pickle, 91, a former Texas congressman who helped pass major Social Security reform in the 1980s, died Saturday of natural causes at his Austin home. Pickle was elected in 1963 to the House seat once held by President Lyndon Johnson. As chairman of the Social Security subcommittee, Pickle helped pass reform in 1983 that helped ease the system's financial troubles by raising the age for full benefits from 65 to 67.
OPINION
March 27, 2005 | MICHAEL KINSLEY
Based on the two big domestic stories of last week -- Terri Schiavo's feeding tube and Social Security personoramification (or whatever they want us to call it instead of privatization) -- the Republican philosophy seems to be that people need more control over their own retirements, but less control over their own deaths. Based on recent polls, most people feel the exact opposite.
NEWS
January 22, 2005 | Steve Husting, Steve Husting lives in Fountain Valley.
President Bush wants to overhaul Social Security by putting money management into the hands of the people. He is between a rock and a hard place with this one. On the one hand, you have an estimated 11,000 pork-barrel projects being voted into law by legislators in Congress who are interested in channeling money into their districts so they'll be reelected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998 | MATTHEW CUNNINGHAM, Matthew Cunningham is a Republican consultant and writer based in Orange. He was media consultant to Supervisor Jim Silva's reelection campaign
The Democratic conquest of central Orange County is a painful microcosm of the national Republican defeat. To county residents accustomed to GOP dominance, Democratic control of two legislative seats and one congressional seat is still hard to believe. How to roll back this incipient Democratic resurgence? Our answer has national as well as local implications. The changes transforming Orange County mirror those working across the nation.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1999 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's plan to reform the ailing Social Security system is, so far, as vague as it is bold. Still, the basic ideas the president put forth Tuesday evening in his State of the Union address could turn more individuals into investors, and provide more fuel for the highflying U.S. stock market in the years ahead.
OPINION
February 3, 2006
So President Bush has just now discovered that "America is addicted to oil" (Feb. 1). Where has he been all this time? The people he condemns as liberals have been saying this for years. I would stand up and cheer, grateful that he's finally seen the light, except that I'm now wondering how he plans to cure the addict. With Iraq, Social Security reform, Hurricane Katrina and Medicare prescription drug coverage in mind, I just know there will be big bucks in it for someone, and that someone won't be me. Ethanol from Halliburton, anyone?
OPINION
January 31, 2006
IF HISTORY HAS TAUGHT US anything, President Bush will spend part of his State of the Union address tonight stressing the importance of achieving energy independence from foreign sources of oil, strengthening Social Security, reducing the costs of healthcare and producing a fiscally responsible budget. After all, he's made these pledges four years in a row without much to show for it, so why stop now?
NATIONAL
October 5, 2005 | Edwin Chen and Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writers
President Bush acknowledged Tuesday for the first time that his plan to restructure Social Security, once his top second-term domestic priority, was moribund because he had been unable to build public support for it. Citing the expensive and more urgent task of rebuilding New Orleans and other hurricane-damaged regions of the Gulf Coast states, Bush said he retained "plenty, plenty" of political capital to push his agenda through Congress.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
With his mother by his side, President Bush on Friday renewed his drive to restructure Social Security and assured seniors that the proposal wouldn't affect their benefits. In remarks to several thousand people packed into an auditorium here, Bush vowed to continue pushing for his initiative. He urged young people to engage in the debate because, he said, their retirement security would depend on a fundamental restructuring of Social Security.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2005 | From Associated Press
Congress will not move on President Bush's desire to overhaul Social Security before this fall, key Republican leaders said Thursday. "There are additional ideas relating to retirement savings building support within this House," House Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Texas said minutes after the chamber recessed for the week. "I expect that the House will focus on these issues in the fall."
NATIONAL
June 27, 2005 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
After six months of presidential speeches, town meetings and maneuvering over White House plans to overhaul Social Security, Republicans are coming to grips with an unpleasant reality: The central pillars of President Bush's proposal have crumbled on Capitol Hill.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2005 | Warren Vieth and Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writers
In an effort to overcome congressional opposition to Social Security restructuring, Republicans reported progress Tuesday on legislative proposals that departed from President Bush's approach to allow workers to open individual investment accounts. A Senate Republican said he had received encouragement from Bush to introduce legislation that would shore up the system's finances without creating personal accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
J.J. "Jake" Pickle, 91, a former Texas congressman who helped pass major Social Security reform in the 1980s, died Saturday of natural causes at his Austin home. Pickle was elected in 1963 to the House seat once held by President Lyndon Johnson. As chairman of the Social Security subcommittee, Pickle helped pass reform in 1983 that helped ease the system's financial troubles by raising the age for full benefits from 65 to 67.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|