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Social Security Tax United States

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NEWS
April 29, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A House subcommittee, reacting to the "nannygate" scandal that sank President Clinton's first choice for attorney general, voted Wednesday to raise the amount that domestic workers need to earn before their employers must pay Social Security taxes for them. Under an existing but rarely enforced law, employers are required to report and pay Social Security taxes for any domestic worker who earns more than $50 in a calendar quarter.
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NEWS
May 13, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted unanimously Thursday to overhaul the "nanny tax" that helped torpedo the attorney general nomination of Zoe Baird in the early days of the Clinton Administration. The aim is to promote wider compliance with a tax law that the federal government estimates is ignored by three of four employers of household workers. By failing to pay the tax, employers effectively cheat employees out of Social Security retirement benefits.
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NEWS
May 12, 1993 | From A Times Staff Writer
The House Ways and Means Committee on Tuesday voted to simplify the way Social Security taxes and unemployment insurance are paid for domestic workers. The panel voted to raise the wage threshold from $50 in each calendar quarter to $1,750 a year in 1993 and to index it for inflation thereafter.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | From A Times Staff Writer
The House Ways and Means Committee on Tuesday voted to simplify the way Social Security taxes and unemployment insurance are paid for domestic workers. The panel voted to raise the wage threshold from $50 in each calendar quarter to $1,750 a year in 1993 and to index it for inflation thereafter.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Democrats came away from their first closed-door strategy meeting of the new session of Congress with a growing desire to confront President Bush on contested issues, possibly including a proposal to cut Social Security payroll taxes. No hard decisions were made at a two-day meeting in the nearby city of Columbia, Md., attended by Speaker Thomas S. Foley and a total of 160 of the 260 Democratic members of the House.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Congress roared its approval Wednesday night of President Bush's new proposal to seek additional U.S. and Soviet troop reductions in Europe, raising hopes of a larger peace dividend than most lawmakers had anticipated. Democrats and Republicans jumped to their feet and joined in applause when Bush made his surprise announcement that he would seek a negotiated ceiling of 195,000 each on U.S. and Soviet forces in the heart of Europe, down from the 275,000 cap he had proposed last May.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The much-discussed Moynihan plan for a big cut in Social Security payroll taxes appeared doomed Thursday after Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, declared his opposition, saying it would cause "serious problems for the economy." Bentsen told reporters that he was not ruling out a smaller reduction in Social Security taxes if it were offset by an increase in revenues so there would be no rise in the federal budget deficit.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The President's chief economic adviser contends that the economy is poised for a recovery but argues that the Federal Reserve Board still has room to cut interest rates further without risking a rekindling of inflation. "I think many of the preconditions for a recovery are falling into place," Michael J. Boskin, chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, said in an interview last week.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heeding calls to protect the Social Security trust fund, the Senate on Wednesday decisively rejected a politically appealing plan to cut the payroll tax on workers and employers by a full percentage point over the next five years. The 60-38 vote, which effectively kills the proposal for this session of Congress, represents a victory for President Bush and a setback for Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.), a chief advocate of the Social Security tax reduction. The proposal by Sen.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two influential Republican members of Congress proposed separate plans Thursday to cut Social Security taxes, a course that is attracting growing support on Capitol Hill despite strong opposition from the Bush Administration. Hours after President Bush declared in his State of the Union address that "the last thing we need to do is mess around with Social Security," a revolt appeared to break out in his own party. Sen. Robert W. Kasten (R-Wis.) and Rep. Hank Brown (R-Colo.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A House subcommittee, reacting to the "nannygate" scandal that sank President Clinton's first choice for attorney general, voted Wednesday to raise the amount that domestic workers need to earn before their employers must pay Social Security taxes for them. Under an existing but rarely enforced law, employers are required to report and pay Social Security taxes for any domestic worker who earns more than $50 in a calendar quarter.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heeding calls to protect the Social Security trust fund, the Senate on Wednesday decisively rejected a politically appealing plan to cut the payroll tax on workers and employers by a full percentage point over the next five years. The 60-38 vote, which effectively kills the proposal for this session of Congress, represents a victory for President Bush and a setback for Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.), a chief advocate of the Social Security tax reduction. The proposal by Sen.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The President's chief economic adviser contends that the economy is poised for a recovery but argues that the Federal Reserve Board still has room to cut interest rates further without risking a rekindling of inflation. "I think many of the preconditions for a recovery are falling into place," Michael J. Boskin, chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, said in an interview last week.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's 40 million Social Security beneficiaries will receive a 5.4% cost-of-living increase in January, the biggest boost in eight years, the government announced Thursday. The automatic raises, which have been linked to the consumer price index for the last 15 years, have enabled millions of elderly Americans to avoid the worst ravages of inflation. The average monthly benefit for retired workers will rise to $602 with the Jan. 3 check, up from $571 this year.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic leaders acted on two fronts Friday to seize the initiative in the national economic policy debate with President Bush by promoting a controversial proposal to cut the Social Security payroll tax. In New Orleans, the Democratic Leadership Council, a group of centrist elected officials, gave a warm reception to Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.), author of the controversial proposal to reduce the payroll tax from the current 6.2% to 5.1%.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The much-discussed Moynihan plan for a big cut in Social Security payroll taxes appeared doomed Thursday after Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, declared his opposition, saying it would cause "serious problems for the economy." Bentsen told reporters that he was not ruling out a smaller reduction in Social Security taxes if it were offset by an increase in revenues so there would be no rise in the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush on Thursday denounced a proposal to cut Social Security payroll taxes by $55 billion next year, calling it a "charade" that would force an increase in income taxes or an eventual reduction in benefits. Although Bush has decided to try to squelch the proposal, a senior aide admitted that "there is a concern" within the White House that its potential political appeal could gather a powerful head of steam.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing the federal government does touches Americans like Social Security. For most of the 40-million elderly and disabled Americans who receive benefits, Social Security is all that stands between them and destitution--making the system a sacred totem of U.S. political life. And more than 110 million people, or nearly every person in the nation who works, pay taxes to support the system. Indeed, nearly one-third pay more in Social Security taxes than they do in income taxes.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Democrats came away from their first closed-door strategy meeting of the new session of Congress with a growing desire to confront President Bush on contested issues, possibly including a proposal to cut Social Security payroll taxes. No hard decisions were made at a two-day meeting in the nearby city of Columbia, Md., attended by Speaker Thomas S. Foley and a total of 160 of the 260 Democratic members of the House.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | Associated Press
The nation's largest senior citizen group on Friday opposed proposals to cut Social Security taxes, saying the system's mounting reserves will be needed to ensure full benefits for future generations. The American Assn. of Retired Persons had been courted by fans and foes of Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan's proposal to cut the payroll tax that finances Social Security benefits.
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