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HEALTH
April 9, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Scientists call it the love hormone, the chemical that binds people to one another. Now researchers from the University of Zurich in Switzerland have found that the hormone, released in high amounts in mothers after childbirth, can improve a person's ability to interpret what is going on in another person -- by reading information gleaned from their eyes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles police said they relied heavily on students and their social media skills in tracking down and arresting a trio of suspects Thursday in the fatal stabbing of an 18-year-old at a Reseda high school. Using tweets from students, police said they were able to identify and ultimately arrest the suspects - two of them reputed gang members - in a Van Nuys neighborhood. Kevin Orellano was stabbed to death Wednesday as he was playing handball on campus, which he had attended before transferring to an occupational center last fall.
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NEWS
March 13, 2000 | HARA ESTROFF MARANO
Great relationships, whether friendships or romances, don't fall out of the heavens. They depend on sophisticated but human-scale social skills that everyone can learn. * Practice makes perfect, even for the socially secure. Stop turning down party invitations and start issuing invitations. Plan outings with friends or acquaintances. * Think positively. * Focus on others. The socially competent observe others and listen actively. "You don't have to be interesting.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Determining what someone else is looking at -- and whether he or she is looking at you -- is one of humankind's most distinctive feats of mental agility. Even a baby human can wrest more information about another person's intentions by looking at the direction of his gaze than an adult chimpanzee ever will. Our canine friends are better at it than wolves, but still no better at this skill than an infant. So, when you're pretty sure someone is gazing at you -- not just in your direction, but directly at you -- you must be right.
NEWS
June 25, 1999
Getting young kids to behave like little dukes and duchesses would seem as impossible as flying a kite in a tornado. But that's just what the Buttons and Bows Etiquette class tries to do. The course, offered at the Edison Community Center in Huntington Beach, meets once a week for eight weeks. During this time, youngsters as small as toddlers and up to age 7 are taught everything from how to sit (watch the fidgeting!) with hands folded, to the right way to bow and curtsy. That's not all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1999 | REGINA HONG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At first, you don't notice the whispering as a teacher reads a book about jazz artist Duke Ellington to a dozen children sitting on the padded floor. The whispering is going on at the back of the group, where a blond woman sits cross-legged among the children. "Josh is raising his hand properly." "Jeremy is giving good eye contact." "Jordan is sitting properly." Oops. One anxious, sandy-haired boy blurts something out. Immediately the woman whispers, "Raise your hand."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1988 | LARRY ROSENTHAL, Associated Press
A group isn't just the sum of its parts, says a researcher who was driven by his own experiences to study why bright people sometimes founder when they put their heads together. Robert J. Sternberg, a professor of psychology and education, found that the success or failure of a group effort is determined in large part by the blend of the members' attributes and skills.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | MARYANN HAMMERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Maryann Hammers is a regular contributor to Valley Life
Before her daughter celebrated her first birthday, Georgia Jones-Davis, a newspaper editor, started fretting about find ing a preschool for the child to attend two years later. She sought advice from friends, compiled a list of facilities near her Sherman Oaks home and thus began her search for the perfect preschool. It was a disconcerting, discouraging quest. The first school on her list was too strict about potty training. She didn't like the concrete playground at the next.
NEWS
March 12, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a Sherman Oaks schoolroom, 17-year-old Tom Iland is sitting through one of his toughest classes. It's not science: Tom is good at science. Not math: When he was in ninth grade, he tested as equivalent to a college senior in math. The class is "social skills," and Tom is poring over the importance of smiling and frowning at the proper time and place. "When you use appropriate facial expressions," he reads, "you may avoid getting into trouble. You may make a good impression.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | MARTHA BRYSON HODEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Harriet Casto lived for most of her 88 years with what she thought was a dark family secret: Her younger brother was insane. "It was just as if Archie had died, except that Mother said that some things were worse than death. It was a disgrace to have an insane person in the family," she said. That was in 1919, when Archie, at age 5, was sent to a state asylum. But thanks to his older sister, Archie, now 78, has a new life. His condition has been rediagnosed as autism.
HEALTH
November 10, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
Few things could be less cool than conducting a scientific study on what it means to be cool, but that didn't stop a group of researchers from facing the question down anyway. Their study, "Coolness: An Empirical Investigation," developed from what sounds like a barroom debate. "One day, a friend of mine was trying to figure out if Steve Buscemi was cool," said Ilan Dar-Nimrod, an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. "We couldn't seem to agree, so being the social scientist geeks that we are, we decided to take it upon ourselves.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By James Rainey
President Obama said in an interview with the “CBS Evening News” on Tuesday that he still hoped for cooperation with his Republican adversaries in Congress, but that he doubted the failure to achieve that so far rested on his lack of social skills. “If your theory is that the president is your political opponent and your No. 1 goal is to beat him, then it doesn't matter how much of a charm offensive I put on,” Obama told CBS anchor Scott Pelley, “how often I have them over to Super Bowl parties or watch movies in the theater or have a drink on the patio.” The president appeared to be referring to Republican congressional leaders' past interviews in which they had said they were intent on defeating him. GOP Senate leader Mitch McConnell famously said in 2010: “The single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president.” PHOTOS: Obama , Romney commemorate 9/11 Pelley prompted the discussion about Obama's relations with the GOP by telling the president that he was perceived as “aloof - more Woodrow Wilson than Lyndon Johnson.” The newsman then asked: “I wonder whether you think your personality gets in the way of negotiating with the Congress?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2011 | Sophia Lee
Annette Karlsson smiles proudly as she boasts about the athletic prowess of her 11-year-old son, Justin (he dashes tirelessly among his school's track, baseball, basketball, football and soccer practices). But tears well up when she talks about his history. "Justin's had it hard," Karlsson said. "He's come such a long way. He's had to overcome so much. He and his sister had to battle the abuse and abandonment. It's emotional, you know; the kids went through hell. " Justin and his 9-year-old sister, Briauna, were separated from their mother after a divorce six years ago. Karlsson was struggling with drug addiction at the time and had limited contact with her children.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011 | Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19): The job before you isn't difficult, but it is all-encompassing. You'll remind yourself of your purpose and dive in. Taurus (April 20-May 20): Your powers of imagination are strong. Your best opportunities come when you're relaxed. Gemini (May 21-June 21): Everything comes at a cost. Insist on being more helpful, even when someone is willing to do the work for you. Cancer (June 22-July 22): You want to take care of the needs of those around you, and they seem to need you more than usual.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
Parents of one child may wonder if they have doomed the little one to a life of dysfunction due to the lack of a sibling. Rest assured, only children seem to have social skills on par with peers who have siblings. In a study presented Monday at the American Sociological Assn. annual meeting, researchers followed up on a previous study examining how only children fared socially. The 2004 study found that children without siblings had poorer social skills in kindergarten compared with those who had at least one sibling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Joseline Reyes had the scoop on the hottest day of the year so far at her school. She had two scoops, in fact. "I've got cookies 'n cream. It's my favorite," the 15-year-old said as she relaxed in the Baskin-Robbins ice cream parlor that sits in the middle of a Glendale school's grounds. Joseline, of Van Nuys, attends summer school classes at Tobinworld, a 300-student campus for autistic and emotionally disturbed youngsters. Besides being a popular place on a hot day, the Baskin-Robbins store is a centerpiece of the school's curriculum.
HEALTH
November 10, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
Few things could be less cool than conducting a scientific study on what it means to be cool, but that didn't stop a group of researchers from facing the question down anyway. Their study, "Coolness: An Empirical Investigation," developed from what sounds like a barroom debate. "One day, a friend of mine was trying to figure out if Steve Buscemi was cool," said Ilan Dar-Nimrod, an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. "We couldn't seem to agree, so being the social scientist geeks that we are, we decided to take it upon ourselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989
Grant for schools: The Irvine Unified School District has been awarded a 3-year federal grant to help students learning English as a second language. The district will receive $69,327 each year to assist these students in the areas of substance abuse, social skills, responsibility and stress management, according to Bill Benn, coordinator of special projects and grants for the district.
SCIENCE
February 15, 2010 | By Melissa Healy
People with Asperger's syndrome, a mild form of autism, dramatically improve their social learning skills and spend more time gazing at pictures of faces after inhaling the social-bonding hormone oxytocin, researchers have found. The study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, is the first to demonstrate the effects of oxytocin -- a hormone that promotes mother-infant bonding, socialization, trust and cooperation -- in people diagnosed with Asperger's.
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