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HEALTH
February 7, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have confirmed an axiom of teenage life: Kids intent on climbing the social ladder at school are more likely to pick on their fellow students. The finding, reported in Tuesday's edition of the American Sociological Review, lends an air of authenticity to TV shows like "Gossip Girl" and the 2004 movie "Mean Girls. " More importantly, it may suggest that efforts to combat bullying in schools should focus more closely on social hierarchies. "By and large, status increases aggression," said sociologist Robert Faris of UC Davis, who led the study.
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NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
“Binge-drinking college students are happier than their non-binge-drinking peers,” reports a study presented this week at a meeting of the American Sociological Assn. in Denver. And the reason? “It may be because, at these schools, binge drinking is associated with high status and binge drinkers are happier with their college social experience than their non-binge-drinking peers,” the authors go out on a limb in explaining. Young people like drinking -- news flash! Underage drinking was epidemic when I was a teen growing up in England: We'd buy hard cider to drink by the ruined castle walls until we were old enough to sneak our way into the pub. All this illicit boozing certainly made Friday nights more fun, but it led to some pretty risky and idiotic behaviors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Tom Wolfe says his next book will look at Wall Street types who hide their status, dress like delinquents and act like bad seeds. It will be nonfiction, ending a string of three novels and marking a return to the genre that made Wolfe famous as a founder of New Journalism. In Brazil to promote his most recent novel, "I Am Charlotte Simmons," Wolfe said that his next book would address social status -- why executives often feel compelled to dress in jeans, motorcycle jackets and T-shirts.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
My husband likes to let his beard grow in. In this way, he's like a lot of young(ish) men you might find these days on sports fields and in hipster bars.  The hairy look has even had its day in Hollywood - in the run-up to the 2010 Oscars, my Los Angeles Times colleagues Chris Lee and John Horn pondered who should win the Oscar for best beard . “A new style muse for the entertainment industry's alpha males has emerged,” they wrote: “Grizzly Adams.” Now the psychologists are chiming in - and the news isn't great for the hirsute ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010
The presence of the ever-reliable Steve Buscemi adds a welcome boost to "Saint John of Las Vegas," an otherwise unremarkable debut feature from writer-director Hue Rhodes. At first, this askew look at Buscemi's John Alighieri (yes, as in Dante), a compulsive Sin City gambler self-exiled to an insurance company desk job in Albuquerque, promises some decent comedy in the "Office Space" vein. But after it turns into a road movie filled with more forced quirkiness than inspired story development, it's clear this one's going nowhere not-so-fast.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
My husband likes to let his beard grow in. In this way, he's like a lot of young(ish) men you might find these days on sports fields and in hipster bars.  The hairy look has even had its day in Hollywood - in the run-up to the 2010 Oscars, my Los Angeles Times colleagues Chris Lee and John Horn pondered who should win the Oscar for best beard . “A new style muse for the entertainment industry's alpha males has emerged,” they wrote: “Grizzly Adams.” Now the psychologists are chiming in - and the news isn't great for the hirsute ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001
Re "Social-Class Patterns in Scones and Doughnuts," Around the Valley, Feb. 24. All this time I thought it was a Rolex, a beemer, a huge stock portfolio, a ZIP Code that reflected one's social status. I am shocked to discover that I must also flaunt a scone in one snooty hand and a cup of Starbucks in my other upscale hand. Now that I know that my choice of coffee and pastry determines my snootworthiness, tell me, what social status symbol determines my true worth as a decent, ethical, human being?
HEALTH
September 19, 2005 | From Times wire reports
Men who slide down the social ladder tend to suffer more from their drop in status than women who have the same misfortune. In a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, researchers found that men who experienced a downward social shift were four times more likely to feel depressed than men who improved their social status, but there was no marked difference in the mental health between women who moved up or down the ladder.
NEWS
March 9, 1997 | MARNELL JAMESON
If your child is the tormentor not the tormented, don't dismiss his bullying as a phase. The earlier you intervene, the better. Studies show that aggressive kids tend to grow into, not out of, their behavior, said Leonard Eron, professor of psychiatry at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He conducted a 26-year study that tracked 8-year-old boys who were highly aggressive.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
“Binge-drinking college students are happier than their non-binge-drinking peers,” reports a study presented this week at a meeting of the American Sociological Assn. in Denver. And the reason? “It may be because, at these schools, binge drinking is associated with high status and binge drinkers are happier with their college social experience than their non-binge-drinking peers,” the authors go out on a limb in explaining. Young people like drinking -- news flash! Underage drinking was epidemic when I was a teen growing up in England: We'd buy hard cider to drink by the ruined castle walls until we were old enough to sneak our way into the pub. All this illicit boozing certainly made Friday nights more fun, but it led to some pretty risky and idiotic behaviors.
HEALTH
February 7, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have confirmed an axiom of teenage life: Kids intent on climbing the social ladder at school are more likely to pick on their fellow students. The finding, reported in Tuesday's edition of the American Sociological Review, lends an air of authenticity to TV shows like "Gossip Girl" and the 2004 movie "Mean Girls. " More importantly, it may suggest that efforts to combat bullying in schools should focus more closely on social hierarchies. "By and large, status increases aggression," said sociologist Robert Faris of UC Davis, who led the study.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010
The presence of the ever-reliable Steve Buscemi adds a welcome boost to "Saint John of Las Vegas," an otherwise unremarkable debut feature from writer-director Hue Rhodes. At first, this askew look at Buscemi's John Alighieri (yes, as in Dante), a compulsive Sin City gambler self-exiled to an insurance company desk job in Albuquerque, promises some decent comedy in the "Office Space" vein. But after it turns into a road movie filled with more forced quirkiness than inspired story development, it's clear this one's going nowhere not-so-fast.
NEWS
October 4, 2009 | Deborah Bonello; Shari Roan; David Colker; Tami Dennis; Patrick Kevin Day
Most Mexicans think their lives would be better in the U.S., and one in three said they'd move to the U.S. if they could, according to the latest findings on Mexican attitudes from the Pew Global Attitudes Project. Half of those who said they'd migrate north of the border said they would do so without permission, although recent data on immigration suggest that the flow of Mexicans north is slowing. President Felipe Calderon's military-led campaign against the country's drug lords and organized-crime networks is "overwhelmingly endorsed" by the majority of Mexicans, although large majorities describe crime (81%)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Marie Babare Edwards, a psychologist who helped pioneer a "singles pride" movement in the 1970s through her book, "The Challenge of Being Single," and workshops she taught at USC, died two days before her 90th birthday. Edwards died Dec. 31 of complications related to old age at the Belmont Village assisted-living facility in Hollywood. Her family announced her death this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | David C. Nichols; Philip Brandes
Ray Bradbury's venerated work in the science fiction genre can overshadow the comic side of his talent. Such is the gentle appeal of "The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit" at Fremont Centre Theatre. This resourcefully appointed Pandemonium Theatre Company revival of Bradbury's tickling parable about five Latinos who yearn for the title apparel is as light as a scoop of vanilla, with just enough unforced spice to maintain its pertinence. First presented as part of a 1965 trilogy, "Ice Cream Suit" became a free-standing effort in 1972, produced by the Organic Theatre of Chicago.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2008 | F. Kathleen Foley, David C. Nichols and Charlotte Stoudt
Written in 1970 (the same year its author was elected to the French Academy), Eugene Ionesco's "Killing Game" is hardly hearty holiday fare. But if you like your humor dark-hued, the production at Unknown Theater might be your ticket. The play opens on a sunlit village square as its denizens go about their business. The halcyon scene is rudely interrupted when twin infants are found dead in their perambulator. Dire as they may seem, those deaths are just a precursor. Panic erupts as a mysterious plague sweeps the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1997
Re "Minding Manners in Moscow," Dec. 24: Vera Ignatieva commented, "You cannot act like a gentleman when you are dressed like a laborer." Yes, you can. Being a gentleman is more than dressing properly and knowing what fork to use. It has more to do with attitude and your concern for others. On the buses I have seen working men give up their seats, while businessmen (whom Ignatieva would probably consider gentlemen) did not even look up. Another example can be seen in James Cameron's "Titanic," in Leonardo DiCaprio's character Jack Dawson.
NEWS
October 4, 2009 | Deborah Bonello; Shari Roan; David Colker; Tami Dennis; Patrick Kevin Day
Most Mexicans think their lives would be better in the U.S., and one in three said they'd move to the U.S. if they could, according to the latest findings on Mexican attitudes from the Pew Global Attitudes Project. Half of those who said they'd migrate north of the border said they would do so without permission, although recent data on immigration suggest that the flow of Mexicans north is slowing. President Felipe Calderon's military-led campaign against the country's drug lords and organized-crime networks is "overwhelmingly endorsed" by the majority of Mexicans, although large majorities describe crime (81%)
SCIENCE
December 9, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Kaplan is a Times staff writer.
Barack Obama's election as president may be seen as a harbinger of a colorblind society, but a new study suggests that derogatory racial stereotypes are so powerful that merely being unemployed makes people more likely to be viewed by others -- and even themselves -- as black.
HEALTH
September 19, 2005 | From Times wire reports
Men who slide down the social ladder tend to suffer more from their drop in status than women who have the same misfortune. In a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, researchers found that men who experienced a downward social shift were four times more likely to feel depressed than men who improved their social status, but there was no marked difference in the mental health between women who moved up or down the ladder.
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