Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSocial Studies
IN THE NEWS

Social Studies

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 13, 1998
Life can be confusing, even frightening. Avishai Zonenberg inspects chairs burned in a fire he discovered at Congregation Kehillas Yaakov in Los Angeles. At the new Getty Center in Brentwood, arriving visitors puzzle over the portable CD gallery guide and welcome map. And the budding soccer stars of the Blue Gators study the competition at a Diamond Bar Youth Soccer League meet. Copying a Master Ah, humankind. Always trying to improve on things.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
They were not even born at the time their city erupted in flames, violence and rage against a system that would not convict Los Angeles police officers of brutally beating a black man. But high school students Jiaya Ingram, Ashley Torres and Jessica Maldonado have been gripped by accounts of the 1992 Los Angeles riots as they learn about them through poetry and plays, readings and recollections of their parents and others. They say they felt shock over police actions, horror over the mob violence and an uneasy feeling that it could happen again, particularly as unarmed African Americans are killed, most recently in Florida, Oklahoma and Pasadena.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1991
A textbook committee for the Los Angeles Unified School Board heard testimony Thursday regarding the proposed adoption of controversial new social studies textbooks that blend a multicultural approach with literature-based reading. The committee forwarded the adoption proposal and the public comments to the board without making a recommendation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Only about a third of American adults can name all three branches of government, and a third can't name any. Fewer than a third of eighth graders could identify the historical purpose of the Declaration of Independence. This slim knowledge of civics — and the potential risk it poses to American democracy — captured the attention of retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. During a recent trip to Los Angeles, she talked up iCivics, an expanding online program aimed at middle school students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A mother wants the school district to yank a textbook that allegedly favors Islam. Jennifer Schroeder said she started reading her seventh-grade son's social studies book and came across passages that allegedly show a bias against Christianity and favor toward the Islamic faith. She sent a 10-page complaint to the San Luis Coastal Unified School District. Her attorney, Brad Dacas, said the goal of the complaint is to get rid of the "Across the Centuries" textbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Sure, there are those pesky academic matters to tend to, but the main part of the college experience, at least for the highly social students at Cyprus-Rhodes University, is partying. There's licking salt off the exposed tummy of a scantily clad coed and doing a shot of tequila 101. And there's the master's seminar in frat president and most sought-after pledge in various stages of undress.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Antisocial describes "Social Studies," UPN's mean-spirited new comedy set in a coed boarding school whose curriculum of sex-and-slut jokes--spewed across the airwaves at 8:30 p.m.--is as grating as the twirps who crack them. Located on New York's Upper West Side, the Woodbridge School is a former sanctuary for stuck-up teens that has been forced by economic realities to accommodate the "financially diverse."
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifth-graders at Weibel Elementary School in the East San Francisco Bay community of Fremont were simulating 19th-Century fur trading as part of their study of America's westward expansion. Groups of youngsters "sold" pelts to fellow student Jason Sharma, playing the role of a St. Louis merchant, then used the proceeds to "buy" provisions for spending the winter in the mountains. "This ties history to economics, politics and geography," teacher Diane Duey said.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Elementary school students in Los Angeles County, like their counterparts throughout the state, generally improved on the basic skills test administered by the state last spring. As a group, third-, sixth- and eighth-graders gained in reading, writing and mathematics, according to recently released results of the California Assessment Program (CAP) test. The only significant drop from last year's scores was in eighth-grade social science, which fell an average of 7 points statewide.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
All the maps in Alan Haskvitz's social studies classroom are hung upside down or sideways. Doing that, the Suzanne Middle School teacher explained, puts all his students, whatever their ability or cultural background, on equal footing. No student can take the map for granted. Everyone looks at it as if for the first time. Canted maps are proof that the Walnut school has a new slant on social studies.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
When Texas' conservative-leaning Board of Education voted for new social studies standards this month, parents, teachers and lawmakers far beyond the Lone Star state -- particularly the liberal ones -- took notice. With the changes, Texas' curriculum is likely to de-emphasize the concept in U.S. history of separating church and state, and the influence of Thomas Jefferson on 18th century world history. It would also cast a positive light on conservatives, such as Phyllis Schlafly and the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy.
NEWS
October 5, 2008 | Tara Malone, Chicago Tribune
Tucker Moore earns solid grades, runs cross-country at Lake Forest High School and is training to be an Eagle Scout. Still, when facing a tough math problem or moral dilemma, the 16-year-old sometimes asks: What would Link do? Link -- the daring hero of Moore's favorite video game, Zelda -- has rescued a princess and freed the kingdom from tyranny. Moore said the adventure game has helped fine-tune his problem-solving in daily life. "I can't go out and defeat the giant monster alligator thing, but I like getting out and helping people," Moore said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
When a trendy young theater company announces that its next subject is going to be the explosion of the evangelical Christian movement, snarky parody is a natural expectation. What's surprising about "This Beautiful City," a diverting if curiously earnest performance piece by the New York-based company the Civilians, is how it keeps its satiric powder dry. Some things, such as the blurring of church and state, may be too important to horse around with (though please don't tell Bill Maher).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Sure, there are those pesky academic matters to tend to, but the main part of the college experience, at least for the highly social students at Cyprus-Rhodes University, is partying. There's licking salt off the exposed tummy of a scantily clad coed and doing a shot of tequila 101. And there's the master's seminar in frat president and most sought-after pledge in various stages of undress.
OPINION
December 10, 2004
Re Sen. Robert Byrd's (D-W. Va.) push for legislation to require the teaching of the Constitution, Dec. 4: At least in California, the Constitution is a recurring topic in the required state standards for social studies. It is included in the curriculum for grades 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, 11 and 12! I know that our state's social studies standards are often held as a model for other states, but I would be shocked to find that the study of the Constitution is not included in the required curriculum of most other states.
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | Steve Giegerich, For the Associated Press
Outside, a classmate did cartwheels on the lawn to celebrate the end of the school year at Kutztown University. Inside Rothermel Hall, however, freshmen Danny Hernandez and Victor Nivar could barely summon the energy to clean the dormitory room that they'd called home the past eight months. The first in their families to attend college, Danny and Victor were on the verge of another accomplishment -- finishing their first year successfully. But neither felt like celebrating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1987
State Sen. Gary K. Hart (D-San ta Barbara) has been appointed to a national commission that is to develop recommendations for improving social studies education in the United States. Hart, a former social studies teacher who chairs the state Senate Education Committee, joins 39 other educators and public officials who will undertake a three-year review of curriculum and teaching methods. The commission was organized by the American Historical Assn.
NEWS
January 2, 1992
Author Fran Lebowitz offers the following advice for teen-agers in the "Tips for Teens" section of her "Social Studies" book: * Wearing dark glasses at the breakfast table is socially acceptable only if you are legally blind or partaking of your morning meal out of doors.
NEWS
May 1, 2003 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda
Valley view, with stars in our eyes Nothing better than free-fallin' in the Valley. I mean, the Sunset Strip staple, the Saddle Ranch Chop House, makes its debut Saturday at Universal CityWalk and a famous Hollywood he-hunk popped into the new Valley bar Sapphire, lured by the thumping sounds on its chock-full-o'-rock jukebox.... Not2mention, whilst cruising down Ventura Boulevard we rolled up next to Frankie Muniz, who was peacocking about in his slickster Maserati (there oughtta be a law!).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2002
Elizabeth Douvan, 76, a social psychologist who assessed changes in the American psyche in the mid-20th century, including shifts from traditional selfless to self-fulfilling roles, died June 15. Douvan, who taught and did research at the University of Michigan from 1950 until recently, died at her home in Ann Arbor, Mich., after a long illness. Born in South Bend, Ind.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|