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Social Support

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HEALTH
September 13, 2010 | By Lily Dayton, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The best medicine for a longer, healthier life may be the support of family and friends: That's the conclusion of an exhaustive July report looking at studies over three decades on social relationships and mortality. People with adequate social relationships — friends, family and community involvement — were 50% less likely to die during study periods than those with sparse social support, the authors found. It's an effect comparable to that of quitting smoking. And, turning it around, people with little social support have a mortality risk equal to alcoholism and even higher than either obesity or physical inactivity, the study found.
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SCIENCE
November 5, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Scientists studying the degree to which brain function, parental involvement and environment determine antisocial outbursts in children have found that social support and intervention can successfully moderate misbehavior. Researchers at the University of Michigan studied the amygdala - the part of the brain that processes fear and impulsive reactions - for clues about extreme behavior in children. The amygdala is associated with aggressive behavior, anxiety disorders and depression.
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SCIENCE
November 5, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Scientists studying the degree to which brain function, parental involvement and environment determine antisocial outbursts in children have found that social support and intervention can successfully moderate misbehavior. Researchers at the University of Michigan studied the amygdala - the part of the brain that processes fear and impulsive reactions - for clues about extreme behavior in children. The amygdala is associated with aggressive behavior, anxiety disorders and depression.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
People who are socially isolated are more likely to die prematurely, regardless of their underlying health issues, according to a study of the elderly British population. The findings, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that when mental and physical health conditions were factored out, the lack of social contact continued to lead to early death among 6,500 men and women tracked over a seven-year period. "They're dying of the usual causes, but isolation has a strong influence," said study author Andrew Steptoe, an epidemiologist at University College London.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
People who are socially isolated are more likely to die prematurely, regardless of their underlying health issues, according to a study of the elderly British population. The findings, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that when mental and physical health conditions were factored out, the lack of social contact continued to lead to early death among 6,500 men and women tracked over a seven-year period. "They're dying of the usual causes, but isolation has a strong influence," said study author Andrew Steptoe, an epidemiologist at University College London.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | MARILYN GARDNER, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
When the subject is marriage, Americans cling steadfastly to two misconceptions: First, they believe that couples in earlier generations--those of their grandparents' era, say--enjoyed more domestic harmony than husbands and wives do today. Not so, says sociologist William J. Goode. He calls this illusion "the classical family of Western nostalgia," pointing out that the stigma attached to divorce in the past locked many couples in bad marriages.
HEALTH
June 20, 2011 | By Shara Yurkiewicz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ms. R., a retired nurse, lives with her husband in Dorchester. She has two adult children living nearby whom she sees regularly. By the time I get to a patient's social history — almost always elicited last after an exhaustive 25-minute interview — I have about one or two minutes to learn about their marital status and children, who lives with them, other social support, occupation, and hobbies and interests. With my head spinning from trying to create a coherent narrative from non-chronological, incomplete, inaccurate retellings of current and past medical problems, I often go on autopilot: I skimp.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Exercising with your pet is a win-win situation because both you and your pooch, or even your cat, benefit from the activity. Get tips on how to exercise with your animal during a live web chat on Monday, April 25, at 11 a.m. Pacific time (1 p.m. Central, 2 p.m. Eastern). Guest Jackie Epping is a public health scientist in the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and she recently presented her paper "An Exercise Machine with Hair?
NEWS
January 20, 1985 | JANICE MALL
A study of depression among Los Angeles County adults conducted by UCLA has found that while the role conflicts of working wives and mothers may be strong factors in depressive illness, the women even more at risk are non-working wives. When things go wrong, homemakers, unlike working men and women, do not have an alternative to the family unit to provide satisfaction, and they cited loneliness and frustration because of excessive homemaking demands as factors in their depression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1996
In a free society, one would suppose that no civil right would be more fundamental than the choice of a life partner. But America's movement in that direction has been tortuous. Before the Civil War, it was illegal in the slave states for blacks to marry at all--even to each other. Into the 1960s, interracial marriages were prohibited in some states. Before women attained property rights in the 20th century, it was customary for marriages to be arranged by parents, brokers or matchmakers.
HEALTH
June 20, 2011 | By Shara Yurkiewicz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ms. R., a retired nurse, lives with her husband in Dorchester. She has two adult children living nearby whom she sees regularly. By the time I get to a patient's social history — almost always elicited last after an exhaustive 25-minute interview — I have about one or two minutes to learn about their marital status and children, who lives with them, other social support, occupation, and hobbies and interests. With my head spinning from trying to create a coherent narrative from non-chronological, incomplete, inaccurate retellings of current and past medical problems, I often go on autopilot: I skimp.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Exercising with your pet is a win-win situation because both you and your pooch, or even your cat, benefit from the activity. Get tips on how to exercise with your animal during a live web chat on Monday, April 25, at 11 a.m. Pacific time (1 p.m. Central, 2 p.m. Eastern). Guest Jackie Epping is a public health scientist in the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and she recently presented her paper "An Exercise Machine with Hair?
HEALTH
September 13, 2010 | By Lily Dayton, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The best medicine for a longer, healthier life may be the support of family and friends: That's the conclusion of an exhaustive July report looking at studies over three decades on social relationships and mortality. People with adequate social relationships — friends, family and community involvement — were 50% less likely to die during study periods than those with sparse social support, the authors found. It's an effect comparable to that of quitting smoking. And, turning it around, people with little social support have a mortality risk equal to alcoholism and even higher than either obesity or physical inactivity, the study found.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2007 | Molly Selvin and Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writers
Three weeks after a five-hour operation to remove cancer in her colon, Linda Scotto was back at work as a sales representative for a snack food company. The Torrance resident continues to meet with buyers and travels to trade shows while undergoing regular chemotherapy treatments. Even a second surgery last year to remove cancerous nodules on her lungs hasn't slowed her down. "My work is one of the main things that gives me a sense of purpose," said Scotto, 45.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
Women are keepers of each other's secrets, boosters of one another's wavering confidence, co-conspirators in life's adventures. Through laughter, tears and an inexhaustible river of talk, they keep each other well, and make each other better. Across species and throughout human cultures, females have banded together for protection and mutual support.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Probing the ever elusive mind-body connection, a new study of 276 people who got purified cold viruses sprayed up their noses has reached a conclusion that is nothing to sneeze at: Loners were four times more likely to come down with a cold than people rich in relationships. The study strengthens the popular but difficult to prove notion that an active network of family, friends, neighbors and even co-workers can bolster one's resistance to disease, perhaps by activating the immune system.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Probing the ever elusive mind-body connection, a new study of 276 people who got purified cold viruses sprayed up their noses has reached a conclusion that is nothing to sneeze at: Loners were four times more likely to come down with a cold than people rich in relationships. The study strengthens the popular but difficult to prove notion that an active network of family, friends, neighbors and even co-workers can bolster one's resistance to disease, perhaps by activating the immune system.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
Women are keepers of each other's secrets, boosters of one another's wavering confidence, co-conspirators in life's adventures. Through laughter, tears and an inexhaustible river of talk, they keep each other well, and make each other better. Across species and throughout human cultures, females have banded together for protection and mutual support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1996
In a free society, one would suppose that no civil right would be more fundamental than the choice of a life partner. But America's movement in that direction has been tortuous. Before the Civil War, it was illegal in the slave states for blacks to marry at all--even to each other. Into the 1960s, interracial marriages were prohibited in some states. Before women attained property rights in the 20th century, it was customary for marriages to be arranged by parents, brokers or matchmakers.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | THOMAS HEATH, WASHINGTON POST
The elementary and high school is a pile of twisted steel and smashed concrete on a shaded corner of this town, yards from the cornfields that bump up against back yards. The only signs of children are rotting swing sets and teeter-totters that haven't been used in years. A gust sweeps off the prairie and through main street's withered business district. The Boot Hill Bar beckons motorists to "Play Keno" with three-foot letters painted by an untrained hand.
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