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NEWS
December 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germany made the first large cutbacks in its postwar social welfare program, and the government says more reductions are planned. In a hotly contested move, the upper house of Parliament in Bonn trimmed unemployment benefits, child-support payments and job-retraining programs. The reforms, already approved by the lower house of Parliament, take effect Jan.
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OPINION
March 17, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last November, the Internal Revenue Service asked for public comments on proposed rules to rein in political activity by tax-exempt "social welfare" groups that don't disclose their donors. The agency has gotten an earful of negative reaction, not only from conservatives who long have accused the IRS of political bias, but also from some liberal and civil-liberties groups. (The Republican-controlled House has voted to delay the rules for a year.) A few of the criticisms are justified and easily addressed.
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NEWS
January 1, 1986 | Associated Press
It cost federal, state and local governments $641.7 billion in fiscal 1983 to run all social welfare programs, from public schools to pensions for the elderly to food for the needy, the Social Security Administration said Tuesday. The spending on all social welfare programs was $45.8 billion higher--7.7%--than in fiscal 1982, but these services consumed the same share of the gross national product, 19.4%. Taking inflation into account, the social spending rose by 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
A UC Berkeley senior who majors in social welfare and has been active in student government and Mideast issues is expected to become the next University of California student regent, joining the board that sets policies for the 10-campus system. A special regents committee has nominated Sadia Saifuddin, 21, of Stockton to be the student regent in 2014-15. Confirmation by the full Board of Regents is expected next month. For the next year, Saifuddin would be a regent-designate, able to participate in all discussions but without voting rights until her one-year term as a fully empowered student representative begins in July 2014, officials said.
NEWS
April 7, 1989
John M. Wedemeyer, director of the former California Department of Social Welfare from 1959 until he resigned in a dispute with then-Gov. Edmund G. (Pat) Brown in 1966, has died in Sacramento at 81. An official with social welfare agencies in Wyoming and Washington state from 1933 through 1949, Wedemeyer joined the California Department of Social Welfare--later to become the Department of Social Services--in 1950.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | LESLIE DREYFOUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"She's been expecting a visitor," says the doorman, a taciturn Fifth Avenue type. It's 3:35 p.m., and humid. The white-glove lobby's cool marble cuts quickly through the heat. Upstairs, all is ordered, calm, removed from the city blare. Filled with art and Central Park views, Anna Lou Dehavenon's rambling apartment keeps the sticky streets comfortably distant. The notion of a night in the Bronx is not appealing. But Anna Lou Dehavenon of the Upper East Side is also Dr.
OPINION
October 31, 2011
Mention "social welfare organization" and the last thing that comes to mind is a group that expends millions of dollars to influence a federal election. But Crossroads GPS, which spent more than $17 million in 2010 to elect Republicans to Congress, claims to be a social welfare organization — which gives it tax- exempt status and allows it to conceal the identities of its donors. Now two campaign-reform groups have written to the Internal Revenue Service challenging the right of Crossroads GPS and three other organizations to 501(c)
NATIONAL
January 20, 2011 | By Kim Geiger and Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
The television ad calling for repeal of the new healthcare law doesn't mince words. "We'll do our spanking on the Congress and show them that we still rule in this country," former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee declares in the spot. The commercial has run nonstop on cable television for several weeks, paid for by Repeal HealthCare Act, one of at least three nonprofit groups formed in recent months to campaign against the healthcare law. By designating themselves under tax law as 501c(4)
NATIONAL
July 28, 2011 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
County registrar offices across California on Thursday will begin receiving the product of an audacious enterprise — nearly 1.6 million signatures collected by Americans Elect, a group attempting to ride exasperation with the nation's political leaders into a place on the ballot in all 50 states by 2012. Its mission is to upend the traditional party primary process by selecting an alternate presidential ticket through an online , open nominating convention . The goal is bold, but the manner in which Americans Elect is pursuing its aims is highly unorthodox.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1987 | From Reuters
Finance Minister Dimitris Tsovolas presented Greece's 1988 budget to Parliament on Wednesday. The program increases government spending substantially on social welfare and to a lesser extent on defense and education.
OPINION
June 1, 2013
Glenn Hubbard and Tim Kane were wrong to say in their Op-Ed article Wednesday that the IRS' targeting of unorthodox political groups chills free speech, wrote reader Harrison Stephenson in a letter to the editor. He said: "The dismal task of the IRS was to determine if groups applying for tax exemption as 'social welfare' organizations were really political groups, which do not qualify under the fuzzy wording of the tax code. Certainly the words 'tea party' and 'patriot' would suggest groups applying for tax-exempt status under these names are likely to be principally political.
OPINION
May 17, 2013
Re "501(c)(4)s are the real IRS scandal," Column, May 15 Michael Hiltzik is right. The IRS should put every tax-exempt 501(c)(4) organization under a microscope. Vague tax rules, the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision and the absurd cost of political campaigns create a perfect storm of opportunity for would-be kingmakers. Being partisan myself, when I saw that key words being used to flag suspect organizations included "tea party" and "patriot," I thought, "Well, yes, and the problem is?"
NATIONAL
May 16, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - In spring 2010, agents in the Cincinnati office of the Internal Revenue Service, which handles applications for tax-exempt status, faced a surge of filings by new advocacy groups, with little guidance on how to treat them. Their decision to deal with the problem by singling out tea party and other conservative groups for extra scrutiny has now triggered a criminal inquiry, congressional investigations, the departure of two top IRS officials and the naming of a new acting commissioner Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
It's strange how "scandal" gets defined these days in Washington. At the moment, everyone is screaming about the "scandal" of the Internal Revenue Service scrutinizing conservative nonprofits before granting them tax-exempt status. Here are the genuine scandals in this affair: Political organizations are being allowed to masquerade as charities to avoid taxes and keep their donors secret, and the IRS has allowed them to do this for years. The bottom line first: The IRS hasn't done nearly enough over the years to rein in the subversion of the tax law by political groups claiming a tax exemption that is not legally permitted for campaign activity.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Who's the most influential billionaire business figure in national politics? If you answered one of the Koch brothers (Charles or David) or George Soros, you're wearing your partisan blinders. The former are known for their devotion to conservative causes, the latter to liberal. In either case, you're wrong. The most influential billionaire in America is Peter G. Peterson. The son of Greek immigrants, Peterson, 86, served as Commerce secretary under President Nixon, then became chairman and chief executive of Lehman Bros.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
After more than a year of needling the Internal Revenue Service to tighten standards for election spending by nonprofit groups, advocates for campaign finance reform may have finally provoked the agency to make a change. Crossroads GPS on the Republican side, Priorities USA on the Democratic side and other, similar, groups have taken advantage of a provision of the tax code that allows them to shield the names of their donors from public view.  The provision, Sec. 501(c)4 of the code, was originally written for groups whose purpose is to promote social welfare, including local cultural preservation committees or community associations, but because of the anonymity it allows, it has become the favored way to set up entities that seek to influence elections.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Federal, state and local governments spent $672 billion in fiscal 1984 on social welfare programs, from Social Security checks for the aged to education for the young, a federal researcher reported Tuesday. That was almost $30 billion, or 4.7%, more than in 1983. But, taking inflation into account, the increase in real dollars was $3.3 billion, or 0.5%. "This is the lowest real year-to-year increase since 1978-79, when real expenditures dropped 0.
NEWS
November 9, 1987
More than 213,000 people linked hands in a human chain organized to urge more Japanese government spending on social welfare and to raise funds for humanitarian projects, police said. The human chain nearly encircled Lake Biwa, Japan's largest lake, at Otsu, 240 miles west of Tokyo. The appeal was for more government spending on care for the elderly and the handicapped, unemployment benefits, pensions and other social welfare programs, a police official reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Parents who transport a youngster without a car seat and lose the child in a fatal traffic accident may have their surviving children removed by social welfare authorities, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Thursday. The state high court ruled in favor of Los Angeles County social workers who placed two young boys in foster care after their 18-month-old sister, held on the lap of an aunt, was killed when a driver ran a stop sign and plowed into the car their father was driving.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
Americans Elect, a nonprofit group that has set out this year to secure a spot on the ballot in all 50 states for an alternative to the Democratic and Republican presidential tickets, has gathered 1.9 million signatures from individuals who support the idea. The group announced Wednesday that it has qualified for the Ohio ballot and is awaiting certification in California, Utah, Hawaii and Arkansas. It has already gained ballot access in three other key swing states - Florida, Michigan and Nevada - as well as Arizona, Alaska and Kansas.
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