Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSocial Work
IN THE NEWS

Social Work

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 8, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a six-story warehouse on the eastern edge of this Palestinian city, tons of flour, rice and noodles are stacked roof-high. A worker steers a forklift festooned with green Islamic flags, lifting and shifting pallets and crates. A brigade of bearded men shovels sugar into small sacks and packs box after box with relief supplies for thousands of Palestinian families.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
February 28, 2014 | By Melissa Milne Ogata
I had been dating a man casually for four months but hadn't heard from him in three weeks. He was nice and a perfect nonthreatening entry into the dating world, as I had been separated for 2 1/2 years and was just starting to think about dating. But I woke up a few days before New Year's Eve and decided this would be the last one I spent alone. On a whim, I signed up for Chemistry.com using a nickname, Milly, so no one would recognize me. I posted a brief profile and two pictures and hit "send.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1990 | JACK SEARLES
Starting in September, county employees and a few members of the public will be able to work toward a USC master's degree in social work in Ventura County. The program, approved Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors, will enable 20 county workers and three non-employees to obtain the advanced degree after three years of part-time study. County Personnel Director Ronald W. Komers said the program will develop badly needed professional social workers to help with the county's emerging problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
A married couple who want to remain anonymous are giving $20 million to help fund student scholarships at USC, officials announced Tuesday.  Eight million dollars will go toward undergraduate aid in the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences; $6 million is targeted for USC's School of Social Work; and $6 million is targeted for its Marshall School of Business. At their own request, the donors are being identified only as longtime USC supporters, according to a campus announcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nathan Edward Cohen, a former UCLA social welfare expert who helped shape the field of social work and led an important study on the causes of the 1965 Watts riots, died Jan. 27 at his home in Oakland. He was 91. Cohen was the first president of the National Assn. of Social Workers, which he helped form in 1955. He was a leader in efforts to broaden the field, which had become heavily focused on the psychological roots of societal problems.
NEWS
December 1, 1998
Celeste Strack Kaplan, 83, a social work educator who aided children. Kaplan, who had taught social work at USC, served as executive director of El Nido Family Services from 1973 to 1982, building it into a major multiethnic child protection agency. After her retirement, she helped found and was the first president of the Los Angeles Round Table for Children, a coalition of organizations providing children's services.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1994
At 31, Jack Light is too young to remember the 1960s, when social work was a popular major on college campuses. In fact, he felt slightly out of place at UC Berkeley in the 1980s when business and law were the main attractions. "That was when Michael Milken and the other Wall Street types were on top of the world. Everybody wanted to be like them. Majoring in social work was out of favor," said Light, who has been working in his chosen field for eight years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the beginning, there was the criticism. Irate Vietnamese last summer called the Social Assistance Program for Vietnam naive in trying to collect humanitarian aid for the Southeast Asian country. Easing poverty in the Communist land would just help the government stay in power, they said in numerous phone calls to the nonprofit group. The harshest blow came in September in an editorial in Tieng Chuong (Sound of a Bell), a Vietnamese-language weekly newspaper in Westminster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1992 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Praising a novel county program that trades higher education for seven years of mandatory service, veteran employees told county supervisors this week that they had done the right thing by sparing the program during county budget cuts. "This is a once-in-a-life opportunity," nurse Addie Lara told the board. "I hope I can pay the (county) back with indentured servitude."
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Terry Lantz, director of the Westside Activities Center, has always had an interest in helping people. Lantz's introduction to philanthropy began when she was 4. As a child, she often went on hospital visits with her mother, who volunteered regularly. During high school, she suffered an injury that prevented her from attending classes or activities for a long period, and the experience became the driving force to start her on a social service career of her own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Dianne F. Harrison, a veteran educator in Florida and California, has been named the new president of Cal State Northridge. Harrison will succeed Jolene Koester, who retired in December after 11 years in the post. Northridge provost Harold Hellenbrand has been serving as interim president. Since 2006, Harrison has been president of Cal State Monterey Bay, a campus of about 5,000 students located on the former Ft. Ord Army Base in Seaside. At Northridge, she will take the reins of one of the nation's largest public universities, with 34,000 students and a budget of more than $300 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
Petty Officer Sarax shifts in his seat as a therapist asks him about the wartime experiences that are causing strain with his wife. "There are some things that I just don't want to talk about with her and she keeps pushing," he says. "… I lost a couple of friends over there. It was bad. " Sarax could be one of many veterans who are struggling to cope with the stress and trauma of war. But he is in fact a computer simulation. Researchers at USC hope that virtual clients like Sarax will help social workers learn to interact with military personnel and identify the signs of post-traumatic stress disorder.
OPINION
February 26, 2011 | Tim Rutten
When the social and political history of Los Angeles in the late 20th century comes to be written, it's likely that two men will stand out as fundamentally transformative leaders. One will be Tom Bradley, the five-term mayor who changed the city's politics and realigned its economic course; the other will be Cardinal Roger Mahony, the Hollywood-born prelate who has led what is now America's largest Roman Catholic diocese as archbishop for the last quarter-century, a post from which he will retire Sunday on his 75th birthday, as church law requires.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2011 | By Seema Mehta
When Gabe Zimmerman visited Washington, D.C., in 2009 for President Obama's inauguration, he immersed himself in the monuments to American history, one of his passions. "When we went to the Lincoln Memorial on a cold damp January morning, the wind whipped through the place and it was freezing cold, but Gabe had to read every single word of the Gettysburg Address," said C.J. Karamargin, a fellow staffer for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords who worked alongside Zimmerman in the congresswoman's Tucson field office.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
The gig: As chief executive of Goodwill Southern California, Doug Barr runs the fourth-largest branch of the national nonprofit organization, responsible for 65 retail stores, 42 donation centers and 24 service locations in Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Sales of donated clothes and household goods provide the bulk of the organization's revenue, enabling it to provide opportunities for disadvantaged and disabled local residents in employment, job training and education.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
For some inner city youths, summer camp is not just an opportunity to have fun and experience nature. It's the chance to get away from impoverished neighborhoods, street gangs, crime and the threat of jail time. Eddie Ramos has firsthand knowledge of the role camp can play in turning around a boy's life. His first lessons were at R.M. Pyles Boys Camp as a 14-year-old from East L.A. nicknamed "Wolf." As Ramos tells it, he was headed, as a kid, for a lifetime of trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The women of a venerable Southern California religious community known for running schools and a college are taking on the problems of one of the most dangerous streets in Los Angeles. Undaunted by the gang slaying of a building owner last fall, the Hollywood-based Immaculate Heart Community will try to extend its tradition of service to the residents of Blythe Street, a block of run-down buildings near the closed General Motors assembly plant in Panorama City.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Clete Menke knocks, families are liable to yell, "Come on in, Clete!" The kids swarm over him, telling him their news. In one evening, Menke, a new breed of in-home counselor, will play on the floor with children of a depressed single mother so she can cook their dinner; he will offer strategy in the living room of a middle-class couple as their children race around complaining and their runaway daughter sobs in a chair. He has answered a beeper at 11 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2010
Betty Ticho Co-founder of L.A. County epilepsy group Betty Ticho, 89, a social worker who co-founded the Los Angeles County Epilepsy Society and served as its executive director for 30 years, died May 29 at Santa Monica Hospital of complications from recent surgery, said her niece Beth Bentley. The organization now known as the Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Los Angeles was founded in 1957 by what Bentley called "an intrepid group of volunteers" who hired Ticho to run what became a full-fledged nonprofit group.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | Wendy Smith, Smith is the author of "Real Life Drama: The Group Theatre and America, 1931-1940."
The Woman Behind the New Deal The Life of Frances Perkins, FDR's Secretary of Labor and His Moral Conscience Kirstin Downey Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 462 pp., $35 -- Frances Perkins knew exactly what she wanted when President-elect Franklin Delano Roosevelt offered her the post of secretary of Labor in February 1933.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|