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Socialist Party Hungary

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October 20, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Hungarian Parliament dealt the ruling Socialist Party a setback by banning politics from the workplace. Lawmakers passed a bill allowing opposition parties to compete in national elections and rejected a motion by the new Socialist Party on political activities in shops and factories. Politicization of the workplace has been a key weapon of Communist indoctrination and is opposed by opposition groups.
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NEWS
May 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hungarian Foreign Minister Gyula Horn was elected president of the Hungarian Socialist Party, successor to the Communist Party. The revamped party has pledged to find its place in Hungary's new parliamentary democracy. Imre Pozsgay, considered Hungary's most influential reform politician, was elected vice president. While foreign minister, Horn played a pivotal role in help making the Berlin Wall irrelevant by permitting thousands of East German refugees to pass from Hungary to the West.
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NEWS
May 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hungarian Foreign Minister Gyula Horn was elected president of the Hungarian Socialist Party, successor to the Communist Party. The revamped party has pledged to find its place in Hungary's new parliamentary democracy. Imre Pozsgay, considered Hungary's most influential reform politician, was elected vice president. While foreign minister, Horn played a pivotal role in help making the Berlin Wall irrelevant by permitting thousands of East German refugees to pass from Hungary to the West.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Hungarian Parliament dealt the ruling Socialist Party a setback by banning politics from the workplace. Lawmakers passed a bill allowing opposition parties to compete in national elections and rejected a motion by the new Socialist Party on political activities in shops and factories. Politicization of the workplace has been a key weapon of Communist indoctrination and is opposed by opposition groups.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the first round of Hungary's intricate election was anything but conclusive, the nation's first democratically elected government is beginning to take shape. The center-right Hungarian Democratic Forum, which had a narrow lead after the first round of voting March 25, has tackled Round 2 with organization and gusto, signing up two former rivals as coalition partners and casting themselves as obvious victors in Sunday's finale.
OPINION
November 5, 1989 | Arthur Macy Cox, Arthur Macy Cox is secretary of the American Committee on U.S.-Soviet Relations. He is a 40-year veteran of Soviet affairs who served in the State Department and the CIA
On Oct. 23, church bells rang throughout Hungary to commemorate the anniversary of the 1956 uprising against Soviet rule, and tens of thousands of Hungarians cheered as Matyas Szuros, the acting president, announced the nation would henceforth be the Hungarian Republic, no longer the Socialist People's Republic. Zuros said: "The Hungarian Republic is going to be an independent, democratic and legal state."
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