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Socialist Party Japan

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NEWS
June 30, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's wild politics took a stunning turn Wednesday as Socialist Tomiichi Murayama withstood the vigorous opposition of two former prime ministers and won this nation's top job--with the support of his party's archenemies. Murayama's election as prime minister--he is the first Socialist to hold the position since the postwar poverty and confusion of 1947--sent shocks through the Japanese business world and was expected to raise alarm in Washington as well.
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NEWS
January 17, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tomiichi Murayama, who abruptly resigned as Japan's prime minister last week, overwhelmingly won reelection as Socialist Party chairman Tuesday to face the daunting task of averting his party's annihilation in national elections later this year. Murayama trounced Tadatoshi Akiba, a U.S.-trained mathematician and liberal challenger in what was billed as a battle for the party's soul.
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NEWS
June 24, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata, who is battling a no-confidence motion, indicated Thursday that he will resign and run again for prime minister to meet a face-saving demand of the Socialist Party, if the Socialists return to his coalition government. The Socialists renewed the demand in bargaining that is continuing today on terms for a new coalition that would remain under Hata's leadership.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under gray, rainy skies that seemed to match the economic and social gloom enveloping his government, Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama launched a campaign Thursday for Japan's upper house election in which the very fate of his Socialist Party is at stake. With Socialist losses in the July 23 balloting a foregone conclusion, attention here has focused on whether the former No. 1 opposition party can hang on to enough seats to remain a viable political force.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a renewed offer from the opposition Liberal Democratic Party to name their leader as prime minister, Japan's Socialists agreed to try again today to rejoin the coalition of outgoing Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata. Socialist Chairman Tomiichi Murayama met Hata and six other leaders of parties in the coalition Tuesday and said he will participate in an eleventh-hour attempt to patch together a new ruling alliance. Negotiations on policies for the coalition began this morning.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputies of Japan's tattered eight-party coalition finally paved the way early today for Foreign Minister Tsutomu Hata's election as prime minister by approving a 10-point platform, but not before they again reached the brink of a breakup. Party leaders said they will meet this afternoon and give final approval to both the policy accord and the choice of Hata, 58, the mild-mannered leader who helped launch a rebellion ending 38 years of rule by the Liberal Democratic Party last summer.
NEWS
June 30, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As yet another scandal struck Japan's ruling Liberal Democrats, the surging opposition split apart Tuesday. The Socialists, Japan's largest opposition group, withdrew their previous support for former Finance Minister Tsutomu Hata. Hata, a defector from the ruling party, is a possible opposition candidate for prime minister if the Liberal Democrats lose the July 18 election for the lower house of Parliament.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first televised debate in 30 years among leaders of Japan's major political parties, Socialist Party Chairwoman Takako Doi declared Friday that her organization welcomes proposals by some Americans to abolish the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty. The Socialists had been trying to remove an image of radicalism by softening their traditional advocacy of abrogation of the pact, and Doi had declared that a Socialist-led government would not abrogate the treaty unilaterally.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Associated Press
Takako Doi was reelected Friday to head the Japan Socialist Party, the country's largest opposition group. Doi, 61, was the only candidate for the post. She will begin her third two-year term when her election is endorsed at the party's congress April 3-5.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Makoto Tanabe, 69, who pledged to adopt realistic policies and transform Japan's Socialist Party into one that voters can trust to take over the government, won a surprisingly narrow victory to become the new chairman of the perennial opposition leaders, vote-counting revealed Tuesday.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama won approval Saturday for a historic reversal of his Socialist Party's pacifist policies, but the victory dealt a severe blow to party unity. A special party convention backed Murayama's declarations supporting the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, recognizing Japan's armed forces as constitutional, accepting nuclear power generation and acknowledging the national anthem and national flag.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's this? A party at the helm of Japan controlling only 14% of the seats in the lower house of Parliament? Radical left-wingers supporting a coalition with the old conservative stalwarts? Or, most unlikely of all, a Cabinet in which three potential prime ministers hold down the most important posts under a Socialist?
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When people here talk about Tomiichi Murayama, the Socialist Party chairman who stunned the world by winning election Wednesday as Japan's new prime minister, it is not his political philosophy nor his leadership style that invariably merits a mention. It is his enormous, shaggy eyebrows.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Socialist party leader Tomiichi Murayama's election Wednesday as Japanese prime minister places new strains on U.S.-Japan trade relations and may derail Tokyo's efforts to carry out economic reforms.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's wild politics took a stunning turn Wednesday as Socialist Tomiichi Murayama withstood the vigorous opposition of two former prime ministers and won this nation's top job--with the support of his party's archenemies. Murayama's election as prime minister--he is the first Socialist to hold the position since the postwar poverty and confusion of 1947--sent shocks through the Japanese business world and was expected to raise alarm in Washington as well.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a renewed offer from the opposition Liberal Democratic Party to name their leader as prime minister, Japan's Socialists agreed to try again today to rejoin the coalition of outgoing Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata. Socialist Chairman Tomiichi Murayama met Hata and six other leaders of parties in the coalition Tuesday and said he will participate in an eleventh-hour attempt to patch together a new ruling alliance. Negotiations on policies for the coalition began this morning.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The ruling Liberal Democratic Party could lose its majority while being outstripped by the Socialist Party in seats at stake in a crucial election next Sunday for the upper house of Parliament, the semi-governmental radio and TV network NHK reported Sunday night. The broadcaster said that nearly half of the 40,000 voters it sampled throughout Japan on July 8-9 still had not made up their minds. But it said that opposition candidates backed by the Socialist Party and by the Rengo Assn.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Michael H. Armacost said Tuesday that a new Socialist Party policy toward the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, which he called the heart of the bilateral relationship, leaves many questions unanswered. Armacost's remark was the first official U.S. reaction to a Sept. 10 announcement by Takako Doi, the Socialist chairwoman, that the party would retain the treaty if it comes to power at the head of a coalition government. "We welcome an adjustment of Socialist thinking on the U.S.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata, who is battling a no-confidence motion, indicated Thursday that he will resign and run again for prime minister to meet a face-saving demand of the Socialist Party, if the Socialists return to his coalition government. The Socialists renewed the demand in bargaining that is continuing today on terms for a new coalition that would remain under Hata's leadership.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata faces the prospect today of forming a minority government lacking authority at home and credibility abroad. Rejected on one side by the Socialists, who bolted the nation's ruling coalition early Tuesday, and condemned on the other by the Liberal Democrats, Japan's rulers from 1955 to 1993, Hata failed for a second day to form a Cabinet and participate in a ratification ceremony in the presence of Emperor Akihito.
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