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Socialist Party Serbia

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NEWS
February 13, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bare nail and the faded shadow of a forgotten picture are all that decorate the wall over Miroslav Martic's desk. After two months on the job as deputy mayor, he said, there has been no time to settle into his City Hall office. "Everything here is still just as I found it," he explained, enjoying for a moment the comfort of a chair. "My day begins at 7 a.m. and ends between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. I always knew there were problems in this city, but that they were so big--I couldn't even guess."
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NEWS
September 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
Slobodan Milosevic's Socialist Party claimed victory early today in Serbian elections, a vote many of his opponents boycotted because they said it was rigged. "It is obvious that our party has a substantial lead in both the presidential and parliamentary elections," party spokesman Ivica Dacic said. Preliminary results were expected this afternoon. Milosevic, who controls the state media, was expected from the beginning to see his party triumph in Sunday's vote.
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NEWS
March 9, 1996 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Waves of applause filled the assembly hall as almost 2,000 delegates rose to their feet, hailing the recent reelection of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic as chief of the ruling Socialists. The vote came as no surprise--there were no other candidates.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bare nail and the faded shadow of a forgotten picture are all that decorate the wall over Miroslav Martic's desk. After two months on the job as deputy mayor, he said, there has been no time to settle into his City Hall office. "Everything here is still just as I found it," he explained, enjoying for a moment the comfort of a chair. "My day begins at 7 a.m. and ends between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. I always knew there were problems in this city, but that they were so big--I couldn't even guess."
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
Slobodan Milosevic's Socialist Party claimed victory early today in Serbian elections, a vote many of his opponents boycotted because they said it was rigged. "It is obvious that our party has a substantial lead in both the presidential and parliamentary elections," party spokesman Ivica Dacic said. Preliminary results were expected this afternoon. Milosevic, who controls the state media, was expected from the beginning to see his party triumph in Sunday's vote.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The ruling Communists have won a landslide victory in Serbia, Yugoslavia's largest republic, in the first free elections there since World War II, according to official results. The Communists, who changed their name to the Socialist Party of Serbia earlier in the year, hold 194 of 250 seats in the republic's Parliament after Sunday's second round of voting.
WORLD
August 11, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Slobodan Milosevic's party has started gathering signatures to nominate him for the presidency of Serbia, even though he is on trial for war crimes and is in ill health. The former Yugoslav leader, who served two terms as Serbia's president in the 1990s, is barred from running again by the constitution. Serbs will vote for a new president Sept. 29, the first time since reformers toppled Milosevic in 2000.
WORLD
December 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Slobodan Milosevic was banned by The Hague war crimes tribunal from campaigning in Serbia's election after taping a broadcast in his jail cell. The ex-Yugoslav president, charged with war crimes in the Balkans in the 1990s, broke tribunal rules by recording a speech for Belgrade's Radio S. Milosevic tops the election list of his Socialist Party of Serbia though he has been jailed in the Netherlands since 2001.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic has promised to ease a media crackdown and ensure fair treatment for rivals in September's presidential and parliamentary elections in Serbia, but several opposition parties said they will boycott the vote. And despite the assurance on the media, the official Tanjug news agency reported the closure of three more radio and television stations in Serbia, which with tiny Montenegro makes up Yugoslavia.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Yugoslavia's ruling parties submitted what they said were nearly 1.6 million signatures backing President Slobodan Milosevic in this month's presidential election, a number they claimed is enough for him to win easily. Gorica Gajevic, general secretary of Milosevic's Socialist Party of Serbia, told a Belgrade news conference held by leaders of the three-party coalition that 1,593,825 people had signed to back Milosevic's candidacy.
NEWS
March 9, 1996 | LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Waves of applause filled the assembly hall as almost 2,000 delegates rose to their feet, hailing the recent reelection of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic as chief of the ruling Socialists. The vote came as no surprise--there were no other candidates.
WORLD
February 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Vojislav Kostunica, the former Yugoslav president who assumed power after helping to oust Slobodan Milosevic, became Serbia's prime minister-designate after turning to the latter's party for support. The conservative leader is expected to head a minority government backed by Milosevic's Socialist Party of Serbia.
WORLD
January 19, 2003 | From Reuters
The Socialist Party of Serbia reelected Slobodan Milosevic as its president Saturday, even though the former Yugoslav leader is on trial for war crimes and had called on the party to name someone else. Party congress delegates booed Bogoljub Bjelica, tapped by Milosevic to head the party in his absence, when he read a letter from the jailed Milosevic calling some party officials traitors.
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