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Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To Animals

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1992
The Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has announced a temporary ban on black cat adoptions until after Halloween. At any time of year, black felines may be targets for pranksters or used in cult rituals, but Halloween is the time they are in greatest danger, said SPCA spokeswoman Mary Brankovic. The ban takes effect on Sunday and continues through Oct. 31 at the SPCA shelters at 12910 Yukon Ave. in Hawthorne and 5026 W. Jefferson Blvd. in Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The family of a late San Francisco socialite gave $13 million to the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The gift will be used to help build a state-of-the-art animal hospital. The gift from the estate of Leanne B. Roberts is the largest in the San Francisco SPCA's history. The 60,000-square-foot center will be named after Roberts, who died two years ago. The $32-million hospital will have a spay and neuter clinic, diagnostic imaging and an ambulance service.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The family of a late San Francisco socialite gave $13 million to the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The gift will be used to help build a state-of-the-art animal hospital. The gift from the estate of Leanne B. Roberts is the largest in the San Francisco SPCA's history. The 60,000-square-foot center will be named after Roberts, who died two years ago. The $32-million hospital will have a spay and neuter clinic, diagnostic imaging and an ambulance service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999
The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is looking for a few good dogs. The SPCA local chapter is accepting nominations for its 17th Annual Hero Dog Awards, said spokeswoman Mary Brankovic. "The award symbolizes the heroic acts performed by dogs to save and protect people," Brankovic said. "Any California dog is eligible for this award, the highest honor bestowed on a companion animal."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999
The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is looking for a few good dogs. The SPCA local chapter is accepting nominations for its 17th Annual Hero Dog Awards, said spokeswoman Mary Brankovic. "The award symbolizes the heroic acts performed by dogs to save and protect people," Brankovic said. "Any California dog is eligible for this award, the highest honor bestowed on a companion animal."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1991
Another mutilated cat was found in the neighborhood where parts of 13 other felines have been discovered since the beginning of July, a spokeswoman for an animal protection group said Tuesday. The head and one leg of a cat were found on the lawn of a home in the 600 block of North Citrus Avenue about 7:30 p.m. Sunday, said Mary Brankovic of the Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1998 | MICHAEL BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pepsi, a 7-month-old Airedale and terrier mix, and Dena, a 2-year-old shepherd and collie mix, were two of the featured guests Wednesday at the opening of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles' first San Fernando Valley pet-adoption center. "If there was one of these everywhere, a lot more animals would find a home," said Madeline Bernstein, president of the local society, which is not affiliated with other cruelty prevention groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT
Erratic yelps had jolted the usually placid neighborhood for nearly a week. No one really knew who--or what--was being hurt until a curious tenant peered over the fence. "They were hitting a large dog with sticks," said Anne Hahn, who answers phones on a new animal abuse hot line operated by the Orange County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The society quickly dispatched a staff humane officer, who investigated the incident and arranged for an adoption, Hahn said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is putting together an educational campaign to teach immigrants that American culture "does not tolerate the consumption of dogs and other domestic pets as food," according to Edward C. Cubrda, the group's executive director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The grand opening of a pet adoption center at a downtown shopping mall Tuesday drew an odd crowd. Women in overcoats and stockings sat on the carpet talking baby-talk and tickling wet dog noses. Men in suits spun their umbrellas as they peered through the front window, waving and smiling. Everyone's voice rose an octave: "Oh, oh, oh," one woman accompanied a whimpering dog. "He's so sweet," cooed another. In other words, it all went as planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1998 | MICHAEL BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pepsi, a 7-month-old Airedale and terrier mix, and Dena, a 2-year-old shepherd and collie mix, were two of the featured guests Wednesday at the opening of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles' first San Fernando Valley pet-adoption center. "If there was one of these everywhere, a lot more animals would find a home," said Madeline Bernstein, president of the local society, which is not affiliated with other cruelty prevention groups.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hugo, a 13-year-old terrier mix, is 15 pounds of nervousness with a hoarse, desperate bark and a ratty coat that most fleas would probably pass up. He has two teeth in his mouth, a heart murmur, shakes constantly and was recently hit by a car. "He would be considered old and ugly any place else," said Richard Avanzino, president of the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The grand opening of a pet adoption center at a downtown shopping mall Tuesday drew an odd crowd. Women in overcoats and stockings sat on the carpet talking baby-talk and tickling wet dog noses. Men in suits spun their umbrellas as they peered through the front window, waving and smiling. Everyone's voice rose an octave: "Oh, oh, oh," one woman accompanied a whimpering dog. "He's so sweet," cooed another. In other words, it all went as planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1992
The Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has announced a temporary ban on black cat adoptions until after Halloween. At any time of year, black felines may be targets for pranksters or used in cult rituals, but Halloween is the time they are in greatest danger, said SPCA spokeswoman Mary Brankovic. The ban takes effect on Sunday and continues through Oct. 31 at the SPCA shelters at 12910 Yukon Ave. in Hawthorne and 5026 W. Jefferson Blvd. in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1991
Another mutilated cat was found in the neighborhood where parts of 13 other felines have been discovered since the beginning of July, a spokeswoman for an animal protection group said Tuesday. The head and one leg of a cat were found on the lawn of a home in the 600 block of North Citrus Avenue about 7:30 p.m. Sunday, said Mary Brankovic of the Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT
Erratic yelps had jolted the usually placid neighborhood for nearly a week. No one really knew who--or what--was being hurt until a curious tenant peered over the fence. "They were hitting a large dog with sticks," said Anne Hahn, who answers phones on a new animal abuse hot line operated by the Orange County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The society quickly dispatched a staff humane officer, who investigated the incident and arranged for an adoption, Hahn said.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
You think it's tough trying to adopt a child? Try adopting a pet nowadays. For a variety of heretofore unfamiliar reasons--household animals ending up on the dinner table, as experiments in research laboratories, or in the hands of cultists--animal humane organizations, particularly the private ones, have gotten tough, perhaps even nosy. Consider: - Animal Alliance requires that the potential adopter sign a contract giving the organization visitation rights. - Pet Pride Inc.
NEWS
October 2, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, Times Staff Writer
As Sgt. Cori Whetstone approaches the yard of knee-high dry weeds, downed clotheslines and discarded, dusty furniture, her hunch proves correct: Amid the debris, lying between an old sofa and a junked television console, is a malnourished dog. She crouches near the skinny Siberian husky. "Come here, boy," she says sweetly.
NEWS
October 2, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, Times Staff Writer
As Sgt. Cori Whetstone approaches the yard of knee-high dry weeds, downed clotheslines and discarded, dusty furniture, her hunch proves correct: Amid the debris, lying between an old sofa and a junked television console, is a malnourished dog. She crouches near the skinny Siberian husky. "Come here, boy," she says sweetly.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
You think it's tough trying to adopt a child? Try adopting a pet nowadays. For a variety of heretofore unfamiliar reasons--household animals ending up on the dinner table, as experiments in research laboratories, or in the hands of cultists--animal humane organizations, particularly the private ones, have gotten tough, perhaps even nosy. Consider: - Animal Alliance requires that the potential adopter sign a contract giving the organization visitation rights. - Pet Pride Inc.
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