Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSociety For Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication
IN THE NEWS

Society For Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
June 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A civil liberties group said it had asked governments around the world to block the release of confidential financial records to U.S. anti-terrorism authorities. London-based watchdog Privacy International said it had filed complaints with data protection and privacy regulators in 13 European countries, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong, arguing that the disclosures of financial transactions "were made without any legal basis or authority whatsoever." The U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NATIONAL
June 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
During a fundraiser for a Republican senator, President Bush accused Democrats of waving "the white flag of surrender" with proposals that would bring the troops home from Iraq and insisted that he will keep combat forces fighting as long as they are needed to achieve victory.
WORLD
September 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The international banking consortium SWIFT for years has secretly supplied U.S. authorities with massive amounts of personal data for use in anti-terrorism investigations, violating European Union privacy rules, a Belgian commission said Thursday. "SWIFT finds itself in a conflicting position between American and European law," Belgian Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt said.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2006 | Peter Wallsten and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Monday criticized newspapers for exposing a secret U.S. government program that monitors international banking transactions, calling the disclosures a "disgraceful" act that could assist terrorists. Bush made his remarks during a White House meeting with organizations that support the war in Iraq, echoing comments Friday from Vice President Dick Cheney and conservative commentators.
WORLD
July 8, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
European Union officials are seeking an investigation of the U.S. government's program for monitoring international banking data, with the most pressing questions aimed at figuring out how much European governments and institutions knew about the secret operation. Lawmakers of the European Parliament, meeting this week in Strasbourg, France, demanded that the European Central Bank and similar institutions in the 25-nation bloc reveal the level of their cooperation in or knowledge of the U.S.
WORLD
August 24, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Amid growing concerns that hand-overs of confidential banking data to U.S. counter-terrorism investigators may violate European privacy laws, officials from around the continent met Wednesday in Brussels to consider legal options for probing the transfers. Representatives of European privacy commissions considered complaints that sharing data on thousands of international wire transfers with U.S.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration is considering requiring U.S. banks, for the first time, to inform the government of all their customers' international wire transfers, regardless of possible terrorist ties, a Treasury Department official said Tuesday. Such mandatory reporting would mark a major expansion of the government's efforts to comb financial data to fight terrorism and other international crimes.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2006 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Henry M. Paulson Jr., the White House nominee for Treasury secretary, used his confirmation hearing Tuesday to praise President Bush's tax cuts and to promise to keep American businesses competitive through improved trade negotiations with China. "I feel very strongly that we should not be increasing taxes now," Paulson, 60, told the Senate Finance Committee. "I watched the role tax cuts played in getting the economy where it is."
NATIONAL
June 26, 2006 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee called Sunday for criminal prosecution of the New York Times, saying its report Friday on U.S. government surveillance of confidential banking records "compromised America's anti-terrorist policies." Interviewed on "Fox News Sunday," Rep. Peter T. King (R-N.Y.) said the newspaper compromised national security when it exposed a Treasury Department program that secretly monitored worldwide money transfers to track terrorist financing.
WORLD
February 17, 2012 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Despite the Obama administration's vows to cripple Iran with economic sanctions, it is leaders in Congress and Europe who have seized the lead in the West's long-running campaign to punish Tehran for its suspected nuclear weapons program. In recent months, the toughest moves to deter Iran from pursuing its presumed nuclear ambitions have come from a bipartisan group in Congress and European allies, especially Britain and France. The White House at first resisted these steps before embracing them as inevitable.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|