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Society Of Neuroscience

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | J. J. POPE and KIMBERLY BROWER
Edward G. Jones, a neuroscientist at UC Irvine, has been elected president of the Society of Neuroscience, a worldwide organization of more than 26,000 scientists and physicians. Jones, a professor of anatomy and neurobiology, will serve as president-elect for a year before assuming the top post in 1998. University officials said the society, founded in 1970, is the world's largest and most prestigious dedicated to understanding the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nervous system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | J. J. POPE and KIMBERLY BROWER
Edward G. Jones, a neuroscientist at UC Irvine, has been elected president of the Society of Neuroscience, a worldwide organization of more than 26,000 scientists and physicians. Jones, a professor of anatomy and neurobiology, will serve as president-elect for a year before assuming the top post in 1998. University officials said the society, founded in 1970, is the world's largest and most prestigious dedicated to understanding the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nervous system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1989 | RICK WEISS, Reprinted from Science News magazine
An unusual brain disorder that leaves its victims able to recognize most human-made objects but unable to differentiate among living things is helping scientists understand how the brain categorizes different kinds of information. The work may someday lead to new methods of rehabilitation for people suffering from cognitive disabilities resulting from head injury, brain infection or stroke.
NEWS
May 30, 1985 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
Shrouded in an armor of skull and spine and guarded by an intricate network of chemical processes, the central nervous system has been for centuries perhaps man's most intriguing but bewildering scientific mystery. A few decades ago, it was virtually unthinkable to explore the living brain for fear of permanent damage, paralysis or death.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1996 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Gary Lynch talks, Wall Street listens. The engaging, world-renowned UC Irvine neuroscientist told reporters at a recent Washington science convention that European studies suggest his experimental drug Ampalex enhances memory in healthy people. He noted government plans to test it in Alzheimer's patients next year. Over the next two days, shares of Cortex Pharmaceuticals Inc., whose future rides on the Alzheimer's trials, more than doubled in price to $6.32.
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