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Society Of Plastics Industry

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NEWS
July 24, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woman phoning the Chula Vista City Hall was irate. After she had taken the trouble to rinse out and store a two-week supply of cottage cheese containers, margarine tubs and yogurt cups for curbside recycling, the city had rejected them. The driver had picked up everything else--paper, glass, aluminum cans and plastic milk jugs--but left a note saying the plastic containers couldn't be recycled.
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NEWS
July 24, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woman phoning the Chula Vista City Hall was irate. After she had taken the trouble to rinse out and store a two-week supply of cottage cheese containers, margarine tubs and yogurt cups for curbside recycling, the city had rejected them. The driver had picked up everything else--paper, glass, aluminum cans and plastic milk jugs--but left a note saying the plastic containers couldn't be recycled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1994
The California Coastal Commission and the 4,538 volunteers who removed 22 tons of trash along Orange County beaches recently are to be commended for their efforts ("The Coast Is Clear, for a Day," Sept. 18). However, I was disappointed, if not somewhat chagrined, to learn that Peggy Blanchard of Long Beach "will never buy Styrofoam again." This statement represents the public misperception that plastics are the problem when in reality the problem is the method by which some individuals discard insulated plastic.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1988 | United Press International
Japanese industrial machinery manufacturers Monday denied a claim by the American plastics industry that rising imports of injection molding machines are threatening the United States' national security. The denial followed the Jan. 11 filing of a petition against Japanese and European manufacturers by the Society of the Plastics Industry under section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | Special to The Times
Fast-food restaurants here will no longer be allowed to use foam plastic packaging made with chlorofluorocarbons because of the threat they pose to the Earth's ozone layer, the Berkeley City Council decided unanimously early Wednesday. City officials said they believe Berkeley is the first community in the nation to ban foam plastic food containers manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons although Suffolk County, N.Y., has such legislation pending.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Seven American companies asked the federal government Monday to investigate rising levels of plastics machinery imports, saying continued erosion of the U.S. market share would threaten national security. In a petition filed with the Commerce Department, the companies said U.S. manufacturers of injection molding machines are severely threatened by foreign competition, particularly from Japan. Injection molding is the process by which hot fluid plastic is forced into a mold at high pressure.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | AL ROSSITER JR., United Press International
Plastics will continue to replace glass, paper and metal in packaging and other consumer goods and will be deployed more often at the expense of metals in structural uses during the next 13 years, according to a study for an industry group. The study, released by the Society of the Plastics Industry, said design engineers are comfortable with plastics. As a result, many new products will initially be made with plastics rather than with metal first and later with plastic as is usually the case.
NEWS
April 23, 1986 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Plastic trash in the oceans is maiming and killing fish, turtles, seals and sea birds, posing a threat to marine life that rivals oil spills and toxic chemicals, scientists warned Tuesday. Sea animals, including endangered species, are not only becoming entangled in discarded fishing nets but also mistaking small pieces and sheets of plastic as food, often with fatal results. "It's occurring over almost every marine species to some degree," James Coe of the U.S.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2003 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
A chemical widely found in food packaging and other plastics may cause severe genetic defects in embryos, at levels people are commonly exposed to, according to a scientific study published today. Laboratory experiments by geneticists at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio showed that bisphenol A disrupts the way that chromosomes align to produce the eggs of mice, leading to aneuploidy, which is the main cause of miscarriages and Down's syndrome in humans.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In July, 1991, Robert Petcavich amused reporters in San Diego by tossing a degradable plastic cup into a bowl filled with goldfish. As Petcavich talked to reporters, the material slowly dissolved, turning the bowl's crystal-clear water into a cloudy soup. The goldfish kept on swimming, proof that the proprietary plastic material degrades in an environmentally safe manner, Petcavich said.
NEWS
November 19, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a setback for several large business associations, a federal appeals court in San Francisco on Friday upheld a California law regulating claims that manufacturers or distributors can make about the environmental friendliness of their products. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the statute properly advances the state's interest in curbing the potential for abuse raised by the increasing popularity of "green marketing," which touts a product's environmental purity.
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