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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
When Lewis Yablonsky was growing up in New Jersey in the 1930s, he was beaten by poor whites for being Jewish and by black gangs for being white. He committed petty thefts, ran crooked card games and carried a switchblade for protection. Some of his closest friends wound up behind bars. "I wasn't sure where I belonged," he told The Times years later. "But when my best friend went to prison for hijacking a fur truck … I realized I had to get on one side of the law or the other. " Yablonsky chose the straight path, using his rough-and-tumble youth as a springboard to a distinguished career: He became the "Sociologist With Street Smarts," as one headline described him, an authority on youth gangs, hippies and drug addicts whose personal experiences gave him insights other scholars lacked.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
When Lewis Yablonsky was growing up in New Jersey in the 1930s, he was beaten by poor whites for being Jewish and by black gangs for being white. He committed petty thefts, ran crooked card games and carried a switchblade for protection. Some of his closest friends wound up behind bars. "I wasn't sure where I belonged," he told The Times years later. "But when my best friend went to prison for hijacking a fur truck … I realized I had to get on one side of the law or the other. " Yablonsky chose the straight path, using his rough-and-tumble youth as a springboard to a distinguished career: He became the "Sociologist With Street Smarts," as one headline described him, an authority on youth gangs, hippies and drug addicts whose personal experiences gave him insights other scholars lacked.
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NEWS
December 29, 1988
The American Sociological Assn. has given Michael Mann, a UCLA professor of sociology, its 1988 Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award for his work, "The Sources of Social Power, Volume I," published by Cambridge University Press. The book provides a new theoretical framework for interpreting the history of human societies. The second volume, which will trace the history of human power to modern times, is expected to be published in 1990. A third volume will present theoretical conclusions.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: My wife and I dined at a restaurant in Los Angeles where the menu noted that it pays a living wage - about a 15% surcharge. But I was unsure how much to tip. Without the living wage, I would have tipped my usual amount. I favor the custom in most countries we visit, where there is no tipping but the staff is adequately paid and has benefits such as health insurance. Dave Middleton Rancho Mirage Answer: Before answering a question on tipping, I've learned to put up the heat shields in anticipation of the flame-o-grams that arrive whenever the topic comes up. That's because it's fraught with emotion, never mind political overtones, economic and sociological implications and, perhaps above all, confusion.
NEWS
December 26, 1988
Michael Mann, a UCLA professor of sociology, has received the American Sociological Assn.'s 1988 Distinguished Scholarly Publication Award. It was given for Mann's "The Sources of Social Power, Volume 1", published by Cambridge University Press, a book providing a fresh theoretical framework for interpreting the history of human societies.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1989
I was surprised to read that the Nissan Pathfinder ad was honored as one of the best campaigns of 1988 (" 'Rio' Campaign for Nissan Wins Honor," April 28). Just a few weeks earlier my sociology class had singled out this advertisement for a less auspicious reason--its racism. We studied a print-media version of the advertisement, describing the truck's visit to Mexico. In diary-like form, it offers a catalogue of negative stereotypes about our Southern neighbor: bad water, excessive mud, a crumbling physical plant, uncontrolled livestock, poisonous food, deafening music and "Montezuma's revenge."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Comedian Jay Leno was made an honorary member of the University of Nevada-Reno's Class of '89 after taking humorous jabs at students. Leno addressed about 1,000 seniors Friday at a graduation lunch. To an art major, Leno quipped: "Art?! So you want to live at home with your parents when you get out." To a psychology major, he said: "Oh--so when you're out of a job, you'll know why." When a sociology major said he was unsure what he wanted to pursue after graduation, Leno turned to the audience and said: "It is hard to believe the Japanese are ahead of us."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1994
In response to Barry Glassner's " 'Downsizings' Translate to Human Misery," Column Left, Feb. 24: Barry Glassner obviously knows as much about how to run a corporation as you would expect from someone in an ivory-tower sociology department. I guess if his department budget were cut, he would borrow or take out of his own salary whatever he needed to continue to pay all his assistants! There is a difference between stock price and bottom line, which is what causes layoffs.
SPORTS
June 13, 1987 | STEVE WILSTEIN, Associated Press
Harry Edwards, invited Friday by baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth to help find jobs in the sport for minorities, pushed his way onto the American sports scene through the back door 20 years ago when he organized a revolt by black athletes. Edwards, a 6-8 former discus thrower and basketball player at San Jose State, was a 24-year-old sociology instructor at the school, and the revolt he led caused the cancellation of a football game against Brigham Young University.
OPINION
December 2, 2008
Re "Bleak Friday," Opinion, Nov. 28 As I read professor Juliet Schor's essay, I wondered how she could express fear of "an economic collapse steeper, more widespread and potentially far longer lasting than anything experienced since the 1930s" and simultaneously suggest that we all pitch in to make it worse by curtailing our normal spending. After a few paragraphs of statistical stew and Church of Stop Shopping silliness, the answer appeared. Schor is a practitioner of environmental monasticism who sees virtually all consumption as undesirable.
OPINION
May 20, 2012 | By John M. Ellis and Charles L. Geshekter
Political advocacy corrupts academic institutions. Why? Because the mind-set of a genuine academic teacher is in every important respect the opposite of a political activist's. Academic teachers want to promote independent thought and analytical skills; political activists want conformity. The one fosters intellectual curiosity and encourages opposing viewpoints; the latter seeks to shut it down. This vital distinction is well understood. In California, the state Constitution contains this unambiguous statement: "The university shall be entirely independent of all political or sectarian influence and kept free therefrom.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2012 | By John HoeffelLos Angeles Times
As the Republican presidential race has shown, the conservatives who dominate the primaries are deeply skeptical of science — making Newt Gingrich, for one, regret he ever settled onto a couch with Nancy Pelosi to chat about global warming. A study released Thursday in the American Sociological Review concludes that trust in science among conservatives and frequent churchgoers has declined precipitously since 1974, when a national survey first asked people how much confidence they had in the scientific community.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2012 | By Frederick Lynch, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Coming Apart The State of White America, 1960-2010 Charles Murray Crown Forum: 407 pp., $27 Charles Murray's new book is hardly the bombshell that placed him on the Politically Incorrect Ten Most Wanted list 18 years ago when he co-wrote "The Bell Curve" with Richard J. Herrnstein in 1994. But by providing a data-driven argument for inequality's cultural and sociological roots, "Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010" arrives just in time for the central political and policy debate in the 2012 elections: What is the nature of the widening gap between the rich and everyone else - and what can, or should, be done about it?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011
Harold Garfinkel UCLA sociologist studied common sense Harold Garfinkel, 93, a longtime UCLA sociology professor whose groundbreaking work examined the importance of common sense in everyday situations, died April 21 of congestive heart failure at his home in Pacific Palisades, said his wife Arlene. "He was one of the major sociologists of the 20th century," said UCLA sociology professor John Heritage, who wrote a book about Garfinkel. "His main contribution was to essentially undermine and reverse a number of assumptions sociologists made of the world.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2010 | By Meg James
The gig: President of Dick Clark Productions. Orly Adelson oversees the production and distribution of the company's TV shows, including "Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve," the Golden Globes, the American Music Awards, the Academy of Country Music Awards, "So You Think You Can Dance?" and " Shaq vs." The company has about 50 employees. "Primarily, my job is to resolve problems. . . . If there is no problem, then nobody needs me. That's the idea of hiring good people." Coming to Hollywood: After serving as a lieutenant in the Israeli army, then earning degrees in sociology and musicology from Hebrew University and the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance, "I met a man who was an American in the [entertainment]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2009 | Larry Gordon
How well should people know each other before they have sex? In the biggest classroom at UC Santa Barbara, sociology professors John and Janice Baldwin are reeling off survey results showing that male and female students are almost equally willing to sleep with someone they love. But the hall erupts in knowing laughter as a gender gap emerges: Men, the long-married couple reports, remain eager for sex through descending categories of friendship and casual acquaintance. Women don't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011
Harold Garfinkel UCLA sociologist studied common sense Harold Garfinkel, 93, a longtime UCLA sociology professor whose groundbreaking work examined the importance of common sense in everyday situations, died April 21 of congestive heart failure at his home in Pacific Palisades, said his wife Arlene. "He was one of the major sociologists of the 20th century," said UCLA sociology professor John Heritage, who wrote a book about Garfinkel. "His main contribution was to essentially undermine and reverse a number of assumptions sociologists made of the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1996
To this day, when Phil Shigekuni passes by a garage sale he is overcome by a sense of sadness. Innocent as they may seem, such sales trigger memories for Shigekuni of a period in his childhood when his parents and many of their friends held lawn sales at which they sold nearly everything they owned because they were about to be shipped off to internment camps.
OPINION
December 2, 2008
Re "Bleak Friday," Opinion, Nov. 28 As I read professor Juliet Schor's essay, I wondered how she could express fear of "an economic collapse steeper, more widespread and potentially far longer lasting than anything experienced since the 1930s" and simultaneously suggest that we all pitch in to make it worse by curtailing our normal spending. After a few paragraphs of statistical stew and Church of Stop Shopping silliness, the answer appeared. Schor is a practitioner of environmental monasticism who sees virtually all consumption as undesirable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2008 | Matt Schudel, Washington Post
Two or three times a year, Calvin L. Beale would leave his desk in Washington, D.C., and travel to the University of Wisconsin to speak to graduate students. Glenn Fuguitt, a professor of rural sociology at the university, knew that Beale had spent decades studying the population trends of rural regions for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and that no one alive had a deeper understanding of his subject. After his lecture, Beale would join Fuguitt and the grad students for dinner.
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