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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Yuri Levada, a pioneering sociologist who was shut out of his profession in Soviet times but came back to track public opinion as Russia made the transition from communism, died of a heart attack Thursday in Moscow. He was 76. Levada, considered one of the founders of Soviet sociology, began his career under Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev, whose political "thaw" allowed him to carry out the first public opinion surveys.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2006 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
The last time friends saw retired UC Davis sociology professor John Finley Scott was nearly four months ago when the 72-year-old bicycle pioneer and resident contrarian tooled away from a local bistro on his beloved two-wheeler. Scott fired off a few e-mails over the next few days but then went silent. After friends reported him missing, Yolo County sheriff's deputies went to his rural ranch home, where they found blood in the bedroom and foyer but no sign of a body.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | Christine N. Ziemba
Every culture has certain rituals that may seem quirky to outsiders. In Japan, for example, shoppers have been known to wait in three-hour lines for the release of "A Bathing Ape" T-shirts. (But before casting any stones, think about those U.S. parents who queue up at 5 a.m. to begin the Christmas shopping season at Toys R Us.) These seemingly idiosyncratic customs -- of both Japan and the U.S. -- are captured in writer-musician W. David Marx's blog at www.neomarxisme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2004 | Stephanie Stassel, Times Staff Writer
Hi Hand was nearly 13 years old when the stock market crashed in 1929. He can recall the stillness of his parents' dry goods store in Chicago that saw few customers in the subsequent months. He can still hear his parents discussing whether they could make the rent payment and the kind landlord who told them not to worry. In the end, his parents didn't lose the store. And to this day, Hand doesn't worry about the future, because he figures he made it through the worst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John I. Kitsuse, 80, a sociologist at UC Santa Cruz known for his theories on deviant behavior and crime, died Nov. 27 at his home in Santa Cruz of complications from a stroke suffered the previous day. Educated at Boston University and UCLA, Kitsuse taught at the University of Washington, San Diego State and Northwestern University before joining the UC Santa Cruz faculty in 1974. He retired in 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2002 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Harold "Hal" Charnofsky, a founder of the sociology department at Cal State Dominguez Hills who had been an All-American baseball player at USC, has died. He was 71. Charnofsky died Dec. 21 of pancreatic cancer at his home in Manhattan Beach. Born in Trenton, N.J., Charnofsky came to Los Angeles with his family when he was a youngster. He played baseball at Lincoln High School and got a scholarship to USC.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Part art exhibition and part travelogue, "Flight Patterns" is a sprawling spectacle that takes visitors on a dizzying trip to more places than most frequent fliers travel in a lifetime. To visit the globe-trotting show at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Geffen Contemporary is to depart on an imaginative journey to some destinations commonly visited by tourists, like Griffith Park, downtown Seattle and Vienna.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even though the students have just finished lunch, no one nods off during Charles Hall's religion and sociology lecture at Cal Lutheran University. His students are seldom absent. And they mostly look pretty interested--all indicators of why CLU seniors voted Hall Teacher of the Year last semester. Hall, who has a doctorate in sociology, has his own method for keeping students intellectually stimulated.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | LYNN BREZOSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the professional referee, it's being willing to work under more scrutiny than the president. For fans waving Confederate flags at the Ole Miss game, it's a sporting opportunity to flout Lincoln. Union College anthropologist George Gmelch studies why people who love sports do what they do. For him, North American sports culture is a window into North American culture at large, a microcosm of a society's winner-loser mentality and a way to unite people who share nothing save geography.
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