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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Composers have paid astonishingly little attention to Socrates over the ages. In the early 20 th century, Erik Satie wrote an exquisite, half-lit half-hour symphonic drama, “Socrate.” At the other extreme in the Baroque era, Telemann came up with “Der Geduldige Socrates” (“The Patient Socrates,”), a rollickingly fanciful four-hour comic (yes, comic!) opera. But there has been no time when the 5th century Greek thinker about whom we know little but whose moral station and thoughts about the examined life led to the birth of philosophy as we know it, hasn't meant something significant for society.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Socrates was said to have been the ugliest man in Athens. We don't know much about the great thinker on whom modern philosophy is grounded, but we do have a pretty good notion that he had bulging eyes and a disagreeable nose. He was grubby. He was often barefoot. He must have smelled bad. He was sentenced to death for not recognizing the gods the city recognized and for introducing new ones, as well as for corrupting youth. But he was, no doubt, really executed for being unbelievably annoying.
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BOOKS
February 28, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
I read with interest your review of the I. F. Stone book on Socrates in Sunday's paper (The Book Review, Feb. 14) and want to send you some reactions. I respect Stone and admire his political courage and defiance of the at times less-than-truthful stories put out by the government. First, the main thesis, that the charges or, better, the resentment against Socrates was based on political reasons, is right but has been known for a long time. It appears very clearly in A. E. Taylor's book "Socrates" (1932)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Composers have paid astonishingly little attention to Socrates over the ages. In the early 20 th century, Erik Satie wrote an exquisite, half-lit half-hour symphonic drama, “Socrate.” At the other extreme in the Baroque era, Telemann came up with “Der Geduldige Socrates” (“The Patient Socrates,”), a rollickingly fanciful four-hour comic (yes, comic!) opera. But there has been no time when the 5th century Greek thinker about whom we know little but whose moral station and thoughts about the examined life led to the birth of philosophy as we know it, hasn't meant something significant for society.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Socrates was said to have been the ugliest man in Athens. We don't know much about the great thinker on whom modern philosophy is grounded, but we do have a pretty good notion that he had bulging eyes and a disagreeable nose. He was grubby. He was often barefoot. He must have smelled bad. He was sentenced to death for not recognizing the gods the city recognized and for introducing new ones, as well as for corrupting youth. But he was, no doubt, really executed for being unbelievably annoying.
OPINION
September 12, 2004 | Sanford Lakoff, Sanford Lakoff is professor emeritus of political science at UC San Diego.
Higher education is in some ways unchanged from the days when Socrates gathered his disciples around him and asked what they thought about the cosmos or the just. In other ways, it has been revolutionized by a host of modern developments -- not the least, improvements in technology. Some of them have altered even the most ordinary instruments of learning. In my primary-school days, student monitors were appointed to refill the inkwells in each desk into which we dipped straight pens.
NEWS
August 24, 1990
While conjecturing how Socrates might think, philosopher Gregory Vlastos ("Second Thoughts on Socrates," by Elizabeth Venant, View, Aug. 6) modestly assumed that Socrates would hold similar opinions to his own on issues from abortion (pro) to former President Ronald Reagan (anti). Socrates, however, might have a few thoughts for Vlastos to ponder. Socrates might ask Vlastos: "Since you admire 'clear thinking,' why did you misquote your Constitution? You stated it 'proclaims the separation of church and state.
OPINION
September 15, 2004
Sanford Lakoff's fine essay, "And This, Socrates, Is a Cursor" (Commentary, Sept. 12), outlines the development of devices for putting information on paper and on computer screens. Socrates would not need these instruments because he never wrote down his philosophy. He preferred the give and take of an oral conversation. Fortunately, Plato's written dialogues contain many of Socrates' ideas. Brad Bradford Upper Arlington, Ohio
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1989
There is poignancy in Conrad's carton of June 21, showing I.F. Stone drinking "To truth . . . " with Socrates. That is, until one recalls Stone's book "The Trial of Socrates," where he has meticulously documented that philosopher's propensity to befuddle his opponents by deliberate distortions in the service of his pro-totalitarian, anti-democratic, and even anti-free speech convictions (so anxious was Stone to avoid error by relying upon possibly incorrect...
OPINION
November 13, 2003
Your editorial "When Day is Done" (Nov. 11) asks: If anyone really thought it was the war to end all wars, why did they give World War I a number? Actually, the Great War took on a number in hindsight when WWII came along. Socrates didn't date his checks "400 BC" either. Bob Silberg Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2011
Bill McKinney Character actor was in 'Deliverance' Bill McKinney, 80, a character actor who carved out a career playing rough-and-tumble villains, most notably the backwoods man who sexually assaults Ned Beatty's character in the 1972 film "Deliverance," died Thursday of esophageal cancer at Valley Presbyterian Hospice in Van Nuys, said close friend Julie Mondin. Mondin was assisting McKinney with his autobiography, which has not yet been published. A Tennessee native, McKinney inhabited the key role of one of the backwoods locals who terrorize Beatty, Burt Reynolds, Jon Voight and Ronny Cox during a river rafting trip gone bad in John Boorman's "Deliverance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2011 | Times staff and wire reports
Socrates, 57, former Brazilian soccer great and clever playmaker who was captain of the country's 1982 World Cup team, died of septic shock resulting from an intestinal infection Sunday at a hospital in Sao Paulo. Socrates, known for his elegant style on the field and his deep involvement with Brazilian politics, acknowledged being a heavy drinker, even when he starred as a player in the 1980s, but said he'd stopped drinking earlier this year after several hospitalizations. He became a doctor after retiring from soccer and later became a popular TV commentator and columnist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Ninety-one-year-old Constantine Socrates Savalas stepped on the stage at Los Angeles Valley College's music recital hall and surveyed the younger faces before him. "I stand before you as a witness to the destruction of ships and destroyers at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941," said Savalas, briefly describing the surprise attack by the Japanese that killed 2,459 Americans and drew this country into World War II. PHOTOS: A date which will...
OPINION
July 10, 2011 | By Deborah MacInnis
Anytime a VIP gets caught with his (or her) pants down — Arnold Schwarzenegger or Anthony Weiner, for example — you can almost hear the collective "huh?" around the nation's water coolers, on its Twitter feeds and shared over its backyard fences. What in the heck were those guys thinking? Where were they when John Edwards, Eliot Spitzer, Bill Clinton and so many others crashed and burned? Why wasn't the very real risk of shame and humiliation enough to stop them cold? More than 2,000 years ago Socrates asserted in Plato's "Phaedrus" that two horses contend for our souls — one, unruly, passionate and constantly pulling in the direction of pleasure, and the other restrained, dutiful, obedient and governed by a sense of shame.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Cheesemonger A Life on the Wedge Gordon Edgar Chelsea Green: 230 pp., $17.95 It's hard to imagine a "cheese movement," but here we are in the age of cheese memoirs! Gordon Edgar's midlife crisis took the form of a tectonic shift from punk-rock activist to cheesemonger at the San Francisco Rainbow Grocery Cooperative. More than a little activism stuck to Edgar, as he learned more about animal rights, the plight of dairy farmers and the possibilities of delicious, healthy cheese for citizens rich and poor.
SPORTS
July 2, 2009 | KURT STREETER
What, you didn't know Socrates was a baseball junkie? You thought Plato and Nietzsche were so above it all they didn't have a favorite National League team? Yeah, stupid me, I had no idea either. But this week I paid a visit to my local house of all things psychic: Tattered Glove Palm Reading of Chavez Ravine. With Manny Ramirez back Friday, L.A. is now confronted with a bulked-up existential question: How should we view those who have cheated the system by using banned substances?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | Thomas Curwen, Curwen is a Times staff writer.
When Walter Mosley introduced Socrates Fortlow in his 1997 collection "Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned," he offered Los Angeles one of its most original voices. Pushing a shopping cart through the alleys of South-Central, collecting bottles and cans and trying to keep himself from landing back in prison, Socrates helped us see the problems and temptations for those living on the street.
OPINION
September 15, 2004
Sanford Lakoff's fine essay, "And This, Socrates, Is a Cursor" (Commentary, Sept. 12), outlines the development of devices for putting information on paper and on computer screens. Socrates would not need these instruments because he never wrote down his philosophy. He preferred the give and take of an oral conversation. Fortunately, Plato's written dialogues contain many of Socrates' ideas. Brad Bradford Upper Arlington, Ohio
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