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Socrates

OPINION
September 12, 2004 | Sanford Lakoff, Sanford Lakoff is professor emeritus of political science at UC San Diego.
Higher education is in some ways unchanged from the days when Socrates gathered his disciples around him and asked what they thought about the cosmos or the just. In other ways, it has been revolutionized by a host of modern developments -- not the least, improvements in technology. Some of them have altered even the most ordinary instruments of learning. In my primary-school days, student monitors were appointed to refill the inkwells in each desk into which we dipped straight pens.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2004 | John C.S. Kim, Special to The Times
Six Questions of Socrates A Modern-day Journey of Discovery Through World Philosophy Christopher Phillips W.W. Norton: 320 pp., $23.95 * Today, some lament, the unraveling of the traditional moral fibers holding our families and communities together continues. And some of the blame is surely placed upon the counter-influential forces of television, videos and other hedonistic media that can bend and alter human behavior. Is there any hope of a remedy to our ongoing social ills?
OPINION
November 13, 2003
Your editorial "When Day is Done" (Nov. 11) asks: If anyone really thought it was the war to end all wars, why did they give World War I a number? Actually, the Great War took on a number in hindsight when WWII came along. Socrates didn't date his checks "400 BC" either. Bob Silberg Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2003 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
On the night of the recent blackout in New York, Chris Phillips left his sublet apartment and wandered into nearby Washington Square, where hundreds had gathered to share their anxieties in the dark. Phillips, a philosopher by trade, did what philosophers have done for nearly 2,500 years: He engaged the crowd in Socratic dialogue. "We discussed the nature of community," Phillips says. "Dozens joined in to explore their own thoughts and connect with their neighbors. It was wonderful."
NEWS
June 6, 2002 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The subject was war and morality, and the words "Adolf Hitler" and "Al Qaeda" hung solemnly in the air at the small Westside coffeehouse. But the soft-spoken man in black cowboy boots sounded upbeat as he patiently fired off another question to a room packed with pensive smiles and furrowed brows. "What is the difference between defending yourself and going to war?" Christopher Phillips was quietly asking the dozen people crowded into the small cafe extension of Dutton's Brentwood Books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001
Your Dec. 9 editorial credits Benjamin Franklin with the adage "Eat to live and not live to eat." Franklin was but the last to arrive at that sage philosophy. Prior to the 1733 edition of Poor Richard's Almanac, Moliere (1666) wrote, "One must eat to live and not live to eat." Of Socrates, circa 400 BC, Diogenes Laertius stated, "He used to say that other men lived to eat but that he ate to live." Socrates was credited by Plutarch with the original axiom: "Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live."
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christian Clemenson's prep school/Ivy League background suits Socrates Poole, his character on "The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr.," quite well. Clemenson attended the Phillips Exeter Academy in Andover, Mass., and then went on to Harvard and Yale. Socrates, a kind of Sancho Panza to Brisco's (Bruce Campbell) Don Quixote, is a skittish, snobby attorney. But the gentle Clemenson says modestly of himself: "Nothing defines me quite so accurately or compellingly as Iowa," where he grew up.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
S oul is a four-letter word that carries a crushing accumulation of metaphorical baggage, and Phil Cousineau ponders virtually all its meanings in "Soul: An Archaeology of the Spirit," an audacious but rewarding anthology of poetry, song, fairy tale, meditation, reminiscence, disputation and confession that spans a few millennia of human civilization.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | MARY LAINE YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES, Mary Laine Yarber teaches English at an area high school
Socrates had it good. As a teacher, he usually taught one or a few students at a time, conversing with them as they strolled the streets of Athens. Today's public schoolteachers are largely confined to classrooms and burdened with oversized classes. Even so, some are trying to reclaim one component of the Socratic method: teaching students via intense discussion. Sure, teachers have always held classroom discussions.
NEWS
May 13, 1993 | MARY LAINE YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Laine Yarber teaches English at Santa Monica High School
Socrates had it good. As a teacher, he usually taught one or a few students at a time, conversing with them as they strolled the streets of Athens. Today's public schoolteachers are largely confined to classrooms and burdened with oversized classes. Even so, some are trying to reclaim one component of the Socratic method: teaching students via intense discussion. Sure, teachers have always held classroom discussions.
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