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FOOD
June 27, 1991 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN
When I was 17, I left Southern California to attend Grinnell College, in the lovely small town of Grinnell, Iowa, smack in the middle of the state. I arrived in late August, in the middle of a lush, humid summer. Two months later, the first autumn cold snap turned leaves bright-yellow almost overnight. It was such a shock to my California-raised system I ended up with a chest cold that turned into bronchitis. The doctor prescribed antibiotics and sent me over to Cunningham's Drugstore.
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TRAVEL
July 31, 2011 | By Jay Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mike Moss is one of the few soda jerks who knows what a customer means when he hollers, "Shoot me a Waco!" Sure, it's a small city along Interstate 35, about halfway between Dallas and Austin, but for folks in the know, it's where the soda pop that Texans knew as Waco was created. In 1885, a local pharmacist, Charles Alderton, invented the beverage at Morrison's Old Corner Drug Store. His taste treat - a mix of his secret syrup and carbonated water - was an instant success locally.
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MAGAZINE
October 21, 1990 | Sean Presant
FOR THE YOUNGER generation, soda fountains don't mean that much. But some of us recall long, cold marble counters, whirring shiny metal blenders and happy children. Evelyn Thunell dreamed of running an authentic soda fountain. So she and her husband Bill, longtime collectors of antique ice-cream equipment, opened Copper Kettle Candy & Cones. The combination soda fountain, confectionery, gift shop and antiques store is a "working museum," Evelyn says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2005 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
It was a typical Saturday morning at Watson Drugs and Soda Fountain, which has been serving malts, prescriptions and sundries in Old Towne Orange since 1899. Orange High School's class of 1943 was having its monthly reunion, and the old friends were remembering the night that Betty Lemberg was prom queen. "You know, Betty, you don't look any different," said Carroll Saez, politely overlooking Betty's bluish-gray hair and the cane she uses to help her get around. "You are still just as pretty."
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Glenn Miller's "In the Mood" pours from the old jukebox while chocolate syrup is poured over a heap of vanilla ice cream. On wire-backed chairs next to spindly legged tables, children and their parents pull thick malteds and root beer floats made with real ice cream--not ice milk--through thin plastic straws. Two kids drop a dime on the marble counter and order nickel Cokes. Someone slips another quarter in the jukebox and makes three more selections.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | ANNE GEARAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There's nothing fancy and not much modern about Goolrick's Modern Pharmacy, where the druggist still delivers prescriptions and the soda fountain waitresses call everyone "Baby." The store today is much as it was 50 years ago, employees and customers say. "They got real wild in 1950 and changed the outside some. Why change something if it works?" asked the former owner and pharmacist, Charlie Rector.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1995 | W. R. WILKERSON III, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; W. R. Wilkerson III is a Los Angeles-based writer-producer. His upcoming book, "Billy Wilkerson: The Great Hollywood Discoverer," will be published next year.
Once upon a time, actually it was January, 1937, Judy Turner cut her Hollywood High School typing class and slipped across Sunset Boulevard to share a Coke with some friends. My father R. (Billy) Wilkerson, was already sipping Coke at the same soda fountain. He often strolled there from his nearby office at the Hollywood Reporter. During the years a dispute has arisen over the name of this soda fountain. Some remember it as Curries Ice Cream Parlor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1993
Oscar Lamare (Lamar) Peacock, an Oxnard native who operated a soda fountain and record store in downtown Oxnard for more than 50 years, died in an Oxnard hospital Tuesday after a lengthy illness. He was 86. Peacock was born July 6, 1906, in Oxnard and lived most of his life in his hometown. After graduating from Oxnard Union High School in 1926, Peacock joined the Los Angeles Opera Fine Arts Symphony Orchestra, playing the violin and bass viola.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I collect old ice cream scoops and related soda fountain stuff. When were scoops first used?--T.W. Answer: Cone-shaped ice cream scoops began appearing in shops shortly after the Civil War. Just as popular among collectors are the mechanical ice cream scoops and other ice cream-related items manufactured after World War I, many of which displayed advertising. Collecting soda fountain items is a highly popular pastime that has remained relatively inexpensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1995 | W. R. WILKERSON III, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; W. R. Wilkerson III is a Los Angeles-based writer-producer. His upcoming book, "Billy Wilkerson: The Great Hollywood Discoverer," will be published next year.
Once upon a time, actually it was January, 1937, Judy Turner cut her Hollywood High School typing class and slipped across Sunset Boulevard to share a Coke with some friends. My father R. (Billy) Wilkerson, was already sipping Coke at the same soda fountain. He often strolled there from his nearby office at the Hollywood Reporter. During the years a dispute has arisen over the name of this soda fountain. Some remember it as Curries Ice Cream Parlor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They take their places each morning at the checkered tables at Watson Drugs and Soda Fountain, as they have for more years than they can say. As the coffee pours and gentle jibes start to fly, the conversation among the mostly retired group of 10 or so old friends invariably turns to two topics: athletics and politics. "They just sit around for an hour or so, drink coffee and solve the world's problems," said Scott Parker, owner of the store, a landmark in downtown Orange since 1899.
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vintage look is there, just past the oak doors with beveled glass. There's the marble-countered soda fountain, the twirling chrome bar stools with red seats, the hand-dipped shakes made with a hearty pint of ice cream. But this is a soda fountain with a '90s twist--penny candy is up to 35 cents, sundaes are dished up alongside cappuccino, salads include fat-free dressing.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | LINDA FELDMAN
My 82-year-old mother, Jeanne, called the other day from Florida and said I must write something about the baseball strike. "Write about your father and the Yankees," she said. "Maybe Steinbrenner will read it." My father used to say that the guys he grew up with on the Lower East Side of New York either went to jail or into show business. There were gangs back in the '20s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1993 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NE-7 was the number to dial in Newhall when a railroad or gas company worker needed his medicine or a rancher needed a vaccine or serum to treat hog cholera. Since that first phone was installed at the Newhall Pharmacy in 1951, the old downtown district and the store have changed considerably, but Ralph Williams' work habits and business practices have survived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1993
Oscar Lamare (Lamar) Peacock, an Oxnard native who operated a soda fountain and record store in downtown Oxnard for more than 50 years, died in an Oxnard hospital Tuesday after a lengthy illness. He was 86. Peacock was born July 6, 1906, in Oxnard and lived most of his life in his hometown. After graduating from Oxnard Union High School in 1926, Peacock joined the Los Angeles Opera Fine Arts Symphony Orchestra, playing the violin and bass viola.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1993 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NE-7 was the number to dial in Newhall when a railroad or gas company worker needed his medicine or a rancher needed a vaccine or serum to treat hog cholera. Since that first phone was installed at the Newhall Pharmacy in 1951, the old downtown district and the store have changed considerably, but Ralph Williams' work habits and business practices have survived.
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