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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Like most Mexican teens of her generation, Fernanda Ulibarri grew up idolizing the Argentine rock group Soda Stereo and its emotive frontman Gustavo Cerati. Soda Stereo was one of the key bands during the heady days of creative liberation in the mid-1980s that followed the end of Argentina's military dictatorship. The trio also was one of the first South American groups to fully assimilate the shimmering guitar chords and reggae-fied beats of the post-punk era, and are sometimes regarded as Latin America's answer to the Police, with Cerati projecting the charisma of a Spanish-language Sting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
It is hard indeed to have much hope for the recovery of Gustavo Cerati. The former frontman of Soda Stereo, the pioneering Argentine rock band, has been in a coma since suffering a stroke while on tour in 2010. El Universal, the Mexico City newspaper, reports today that Lilian Clark, the singer's mother, believes there still may be "small signs of hope" to be found in her son's condition. "We who are helping at his side every day, we note some responses, small perhaps, but responses," the newspaper quotes Clark as telling Colombia's RCN Radio in Spanish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER
With an electronica-tinged album titled "Bocanada" that was released last year to wide critical acclaim, Argentine singer Gustavo Cerati emerged unscathed from the ashes of Soda Stereo, the seminal rock en espan~ol band he founded in the '80s and broke up a decade and a half later. Because Cerati's new material is vastly superior to his work with the band, it was a shock that the best moment of his performance Tuesday at JC Fandango in Anaheim came in the form of a Soda Stereo song.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
LAS VEGAS -- Colombian rock superstar Juanes won the Album of the Year trophy for “Juanes MTV Unplugged” at the XIII Annual Latin Grammy Awards on Thursday evening in Las Vegas, and the Mexico City sibling pop duo Jesse y Joy (that's Jesse and Joy, to English speakers) won both Record of the Year and Song of the Year for their melancholy, down-tempo lover's lament “¡Corre!” (Run!). Certifying their swift rise from upstarts to establishment pros, Jesse y Joy, who were voted Best New Artist in 2007, this year also won for Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Album for “¿Con Quién Se Queda El Perro?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Ernesto Lechner
Four live albums that both revive exhilarating memories and inspire reassessments of the performers' work are the focus of this month's Latin Pulse, a look at noteworthy recent releases in the field of Latin pop. *** 1/2 Soda Stereo, "El Ultimo Concierto," BMG Latin. If you care at all about rock en espan~ol, you'll find it difficult not to be moved by this two-CD document of Soda Stereo's farewell concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2007 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
It was 3 p.m. in Mexico City and singer Gustavo Cerati had just gotten up at his hotel to start another day on the road. Time gets turned around for musicians on tour and the veteran Argentine rocker still sounded a little groggy when he came to the phone to talk about the reunion of his old band, Soda Stereo, one of the most popular and influential groups in the history of rock en espanol.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1996 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you wonder where all this rock en espanol is coming from, look no further than the Argentine trio Soda Stereo--even if they don't want to take any credit. "We didn't invent anything--rock en espanol began many years ago," says the group's singer, guitarist and main songwriter, Gustavo Cerati.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
The family of Gustavo Cerati say they appreciate the global outpouring of affection for the Argentine singer-guitarist and former Soda Stereo frontman since he fell into a coma after suffering a stroke in May 2010 in Caracas, Venezuela. But Argentine newspapers this week are reporting that the family won't officially back any of the tributes and homages to Cerati that are being planned by his worldwide fan base. A story in the Buenos Aires tabloid Clarin cited a statement posted on the singer's website that his family had thanked everyone who has expressed support for Cerati.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
At their early 1990s peak, Gustavo Cerati and his band Soda Stereo were widely regarded as the Police of Argentina. And with his Byronic good looks, anguished vocals and alternately ambient and power-riffing guitar playing, Cerati, the trio's frontman, suited the role of a South American Sting. After Soda Stereo split up in 1997 over creative differences, Cerati pushed forward with his own successful solo career, much like the British rocker otherwise known as Gordon Sumner.
NEWS
August 10, 2006 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
THE enclosed arena formerly known as Estadio Obras is considered to be the local temple of Latin rock in Argentina. Renamed Estadio Pepsi Music by you-know-who, this cavernous venue has maintained a certain rough, rebellious charm. On this unusually warm June evening in the midst of a cold Buenos Aires winter, the capacity crowd goes wild as it soaks up the sounds of Gustavo Cerati -- one of Argentina's biggest rock stars. Still, the fans voice their discontent. "Soooda, Soooda."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
The family of Gustavo Cerati say they appreciate the global outpouring of affection for the Argentine singer-guitarist and former Soda Stereo frontman since he fell into a coma after suffering a stroke in May 2010 in Caracas, Venezuela. But Argentine newspapers this week are reporting that the family won't officially back any of the tributes and homages to Cerati that are being planned by his worldwide fan base. A story in the Buenos Aires tabloid Clarin cited a statement posted on the singer's website that his family had thanked everyone who has expressed support for Cerati.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Like most Mexican teens of her generation, Fernanda Ulibarri grew up idolizing the Argentine rock group Soda Stereo and its emotive frontman Gustavo Cerati. Soda Stereo was one of the key bands during the heady days of creative liberation in the mid-1980s that followed the end of Argentina's military dictatorship. The trio also was one of the first South American groups to fully assimilate the shimmering guitar chords and reggae-fied beats of the post-punk era, and are sometimes regarded as Latin America's answer to the Police, with Cerati projecting the charisma of a Spanish-language Sting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
At their early 1990s peak, Gustavo Cerati and his band Soda Stereo were widely regarded as the Police of Argentina. And with his Byronic good looks, anguished vocals and alternately ambient and power-riffing guitar playing, Cerati, the trio's frontman, suited the role of a South American Sting. After Soda Stereo split up in 1997 over creative differences, Cerati pushed forward with his own successful solo career, much like the British rocker otherwise known as Gordon Sumner.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2007 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
It was 3 p.m. in Mexico City and singer Gustavo Cerati had just gotten up at his hotel to start another day on the road. Time gets turned around for musicians on tour and the veteran Argentine rocker still sounded a little groggy when he came to the phone to talk about the reunion of his old band, Soda Stereo, one of the most popular and influential groups in the history of rock en espanol.
NEWS
August 10, 2006 | Ernesto Lechner, Special to The Times
THE enclosed arena formerly known as Estadio Obras is considered to be the local temple of Latin rock in Argentina. Renamed Estadio Pepsi Music by you-know-who, this cavernous venue has maintained a certain rough, rebellious charm. On this unusually warm June evening in the midst of a cold Buenos Aires winter, the capacity crowd goes wild as it soaks up the sounds of Gustavo Cerati -- one of Argentina's biggest rock stars. Still, the fans voice their discontent. "Soooda, Soooda."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER
With an electronica-tinged album titled "Bocanada" that was released last year to wide critical acclaim, Argentine singer Gustavo Cerati emerged unscathed from the ashes of Soda Stereo, the seminal rock en espan~ol band he founded in the '80s and broke up a decade and a half later. Because Cerati's new material is vastly superior to his work with the band, it was a shock that the best moment of his performance Tuesday at JC Fandango in Anaheim came in the form of a Soda Stereo song.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, Ernesto Lechner is a frequent contributor to Calendar
For rock en espan~ol fans, the time has come to enjoy the fruits of the support they've given two bands for more than 15 years. When the debut efforts by Argentine groups Soda Stereo and Fabulosos Cadillacs were released in the early '80s, few could have guessed that somewhere down the line the artists in both outfits would end up making music of the highest caliber. At its inception, Soda Stereo was a minimalist trio obsessed with the most superficial aspects of British new wave music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
It is hard indeed to have much hope for the recovery of Gustavo Cerati. The former frontman of Soda Stereo, the pioneering Argentine rock band, has been in a coma since suffering a stroke while on tour in 2010. El Universal, the Mexico City newspaper, reports today that Lilian Clark, the singer's mother, believes there still may be "small signs of hope" to be found in her son's condition. "We who are helping at his side every day, we note some responses, small perhaps, but responses," the newspaper quotes Clark as telling Colombia's RCN Radio in Spanish.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER, Ernesto Lechner is a frequent contributor to Calendar
For rock en espan~ol fans, the time has come to enjoy the fruits of the support they've given two bands for more than 15 years. When the debut efforts by Argentine groups Soda Stereo and Fabulosos Cadillacs were released in the early '80s, few could have guessed that somewhere down the line the artists in both outfits would end up making music of the highest caliber. At its inception, Soda Stereo was a minimalist trio obsessed with the most superficial aspects of British new wave music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Ernesto Lechner
Four live albums that both revive exhilarating memories and inspire reassessments of the performers' work are the focus of this month's Latin Pulse, a look at noteworthy recent releases in the field of Latin pop. *** 1/2 Soda Stereo, "El Ultimo Concierto," BMG Latin. If you care at all about rock en espan~ol, you'll find it difficult not to be moved by this two-CD document of Soda Stereo's farewell concert.
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