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NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Reality TV star Bethenny Frankel's Skinnygirl Margarita was recently yanked from the shelves of Whole Foods markets for purportedly having a non-natural preservative thought to be sodium benzoate. Though the bottle reads "all natural," the grocery chain wasn't OK with it. TMZ reports that a class action lawsuit has also been filed against the parent company alleging misleading claims about the product being natural. What is sodium benzoate, and should you be worried about ingesting it?
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SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Apparently, not all pills got the memo about, first, doing no harm. Many formulations of common medications contain high levels of sodium, and a new study finds that people who take those medications are 22% more likely to suffer a non-fatal stroke and 28% more likely to die of any cause than people who take the same medications in formulations that do not contain sodium. Among the patients in the study who took medications containing sodium, the median daily sodium dose from those medicines  alone was 106.8 millimoles a day -- higher than recommended daily maximum dietary intake of 104 millimoles a day. The newest study on sodium in medicines was published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)
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NEWS
August 5, 2010
For those who crave the sweet taste of sugar, but not the 15 calories that come with each teaspoon,  there are plenty of alternatives -- sucralose (better known as Splenda), aspartame (Equal) and saccharine (Sweet'N Low), just to name a few. But where are the alternatives to salt? It's a good question. Public health experts keep telling us that we need to cut back on our sodium consumption in order to bring down the nation's blood pressure and reduce our risk for heart attacks and strokes.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Want to satisfy your full day's requirement of salt, fat and calories? Sit down in a restaurant and order a meal. After an exhaustive analysis of 3,507 possible ways to order 685 meals at 19 restaurants chains in Canada, researchers found that the average meal contained 151% of the recommended daily value of sodium. That means a single breakfast, lunch or dinner had enough sodium to get you through an entire day and a half. Overall, more than 80% of the meals studied contained at least a full day's supply of sodium, according to a report published online Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.
SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Apparently, not all pills got the memo about, first, doing no harm. Many formulations of common medications contain high levels of sodium, and a new study finds that people who take those medications are 22% more likely to suffer a non-fatal stroke and 28% more likely to die of any cause than people who take the same medications in formulations that do not contain sodium. Among the patients in the study who took medications containing sodium, the median daily sodium dose from those medicines  alone was 106.8 millimoles a day -- higher than recommended daily maximum dietary intake of 104 millimoles a day. The newest study on sodium in medicines was published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)
HEALTH
July 24, 2011 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For decades now, we've heard that too much sodium can cause hypertension and raise the risk of cardiovascular disease. People have paid far less attention to potassium, a mineral that has opposite effects on health: Get enough of it, and it can actually lower your blood pressure and protect your heart. Now a study of more than 12,000 adults has underscored something that doctors and nutritionists have been saying for years: If you watch your sodium but ignore potassium, you're missing an important part of the picture.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Campbell Soup Co. said it was reducing the sodium in 48 soups to meet government criteria for healthy foods. The 36 ready-to-serve soups and 12 condensed soups for children will have 480 milligrams of sodium per serving. That reduces the sodium in the children's soups by one-fifth, the Camden, N.J.-based company said. Campbell also said it would increase its soup prices by 5% because of the rising cost of wheat. The company will also raise the price of its Prego spaghetti sauces and V8 juices.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2009 | Times Staff Reports
Campbell Soup Co. has rolled out a new version of its best-selling tomato soup, promising that extensive research found that it tastes much like the old version. The difference? The new soup has 480 milligrams of sodium per serving, compared with 710 milligrams in the previous formulation. The reduction is part of a drive by the company to follow the advice of health and nutrition advocates and lower the sodium content of its products. Doctors recommend against eating more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium a day. So one serving of soup -- there are 2.5 in each can -- contains 21% of the daily allowance.
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Frozen diet meals--increasingly the dinner choice of many weight-conscious but busy Americans--deliver their promise of low calories. But many are too high in fat and sodium, warns the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
HEALTH
May 17, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For decades, people have been ignoring advice to eat less salt — in large part because it's hard to avoid. Processed and restaurant foods are simply loaded with sodium. Now, under growing pressure from doctors, consumers, states, advocacy groups and even national-level advisors, big-name food companies are slashing sodium from soups, potato chips, sauces, condiments and other products. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration announced its intent to reduce salt in the American diet, beginning with a call for voluntary cutbacks from the food industry.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Are Americans getting mixed messages about how much sodium they should be consuming? Lately, yes, and some of those messages are muddled because studies themselves are muddled, a panel of doctors has concluded. The Institute of Medicine panel reconfirmed evidence that high sodium in diets is associated with increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. But other evidence in recent medical studies, such as a link between high sodium intake and gastric cancer, for example, was found to be inconclusive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Jose Landaverde was inspired to cook by memories of making pupusas with his late father, who was killed in El Salvador. Jorge Perez's interest in food was cultivated by his grandfather, a caterer who introduced him to exotic spices on a trip to Thailand. And Lucile Flores was practically raised in kitchens, especially at the Jack in the Box restaurant where both of her parents work. Drawn to food by powerful family ties, the Los Angeles Unified student chefs took their culinary interest a grand step further Thursday as they vied to win the local round of a national high school healthful cooking competition.
HEALTH
December 8, 2012
Ruffles Cheddar & Sour Cream Serving size: 11 chips Sodium: 180 milligrams Fat: 10 grams Carbs: 15 g Protein: 2 g Calories: 160   Terra Thai Basil Curry Exotic Vegetable Chips Serving size: 15 chips Sodium: 100 mg Fat: 8 g Carbs: 18 g Protein: 0 g Calories: 140   Crisproot Sea Salt Casava Chips Serving size: 23 chips Sodium: 150 mg Fat: 7 g Carbs: 18 g...
HEALTH
November 3, 2012 | Chris Woolston
Anywhere someone is lifting a weight, strapping on a football helmet or lacing up running shoes, there's probably a big bottle of green, blue or neon orange liquid nearby. Gatorade, Powerade and other sports drinks have drenched just about every sport in America, from triathlons to pee-wee soccer. But sports drinks are also popular with spectators in the stands, kids playing video games, long haul truckers and office workers. Lots of people chug down sports drinks without ever breaking a sweat.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | David Lazarus
Anthem Blue Cross wants people to eat better. And to help its members make more healthful food choices, the insurance giant is sending out money-saving coupons. For ice cream. And processed sandwich meat. And mayonnaise. And canned vegetables. And, strangely, deodorant. The coupon campaign is being tested among thousands of Anthem members in California. If it proves popular, the coupons will probably be offered nationwide. "We want you to know that we're much more than just your health plan," the insurer declares in its letter accompanying the coupons.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Burger King is getting healthier -- or so the fast-food chain would have you believe. BK has unveiled a new menu that includes 10 dishes it says will appeal to diet- and fitness-conscious consumers. These taste treats include Caesar salads, smoothies and wraps. "We spent the last year analyzing every aspect of our business to better understand what our guests expect from the Burger King dining experience," says Steve Wiborg, the company's North American president. "We found that consumers wanted a broader range of menu options to complement our signature fire-grilled burgers.
HEALTH
March 23, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
What will it take to get Americans — and the food industrial complex — to get serious about taking some of the salt out of our diets? In September, a study in the American Journal of Health Promotion calculated that Americans could eliminate 11 million cases of hypertension, save $18 billion in medical costs and add 312,000 years to our collective lives by reducing our daily sodium intake from about 3,300 milligrams per day to the...
OPINION
October 20, 2010 | By Jonathan E. Fielding and Paul Simon
The Times' Oct. 15 editorial (" Wait a New York minute! ") on New York City's recent actions to improve nutrition misses the mark on several counts. We disagree with a number of the opinions expressed in the editorial regarding public health efforts by Mayor Michael Bloomberg to reduce the consumption of sodium and sugar-sweetened beverages First, Americans now consume nearly double the daily recommended amount of salt. More than 75% of this intake comes from processed foods and restaurant fare, over which consumers have little control.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A recent study found that kids may develop a taste for salt early on, a recent study finds, if they're fed starchy foods that contain sodium.   What foods are we talking about? Things like soft breads, cereals and crackers, items that many parents probably think nothing about handing to their kids. In the study published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , infants tried out different concentrations of salt solutions and water to see which they preferred.
HEALTH
December 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Feeding young babies solid foods such as crackers, cereals and bread, which tend to be high in salt, may set them up for a lifelong preference for salt, researchers reported Tuesday. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggests that efforts to reduce salt intake among Americans should begin early in life. It is even possible, the authors said, that infancy contains a "sensitivity window" in which exposure to certain foods and tastes programs the brain to desire them in the future.
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