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Soft Spot

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November 16, 1997 | RUSS PARSONS, Russ Parsons is a Times food columnist
Contrary to its sunny image, the countryside of central Italy in late fall is chilly, even bitterly cold when the wind blows. The sky is pale blue and the landscape is dominated by shades of beige. Driving through Umbria one late November afternoon, I found this dreary picture brightened only by the occasional roadside tree, naked of leaves but so studded with a deep orange, almost golden, fruit that it looked as if it were sprouting hundreds of tiny golden suns.
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SPORTS
April 25, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Bryn Renner takes his role as North Carolina's quarterback seriously. Perhaps he has a soft spot in his heart for fainting goats. Or maybe he just thought the whole thing was stupid. For whatever reason, Renner didn't seem to appreciate it one day in practice last fall when every player on the field, except him, fell to the ground and rolled over as soon as the ball was snapped. Renner reacted by slamming the ball to the ground and running downfield. On his way back, he batted the ball away with his helmet and refused to take high-fives from his teammates.
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SPORTS
April 9, 1991
John Akridge, the Metropolitan Washington Baseball president, had announced the "retirement" of the nickname Senators when the contest began March 12. He said at the time that Washington would be a new expansion city and the Senators are part of its past. "I had a soft spot for the Nationals because it has a historical tie-in to a team in Washington," Akridge said Monday. "One that didn't leave."
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds
If your job is traveling around California, as mine has been on and off since 1992, you get used to two things. First, wherever you go, the odds are good that Mark Twain beat you to it 140 years ago.   Second, the odds are even better than Huell Howser, California's tourist laureate, beat you 14 years ago. If so, you can bet that the locals remember his visit fondly, and that legions of Californians remember it too. It's happened to me at...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986
The mere fact that so many people are so strongly against "Blue Velvet" only helps to substantiate its validity. By revealing and omnipresent darkness we like to keep tucked neatly away, director David Lynch has opened a Pandora's Box not everyone cared to open. It has surely touched many a soft spot, eh? This is what art is meant to do. PATRICE SCHAFER Dana Point
FOOD
October 21, 1998
I'm shifting more into lighter reds as we're moving into fall, more Pinots and Sangioveses and such. I have a particular soft spot for Burgundies, and the '96s are hitting our shores and they are stunning. Domaine de L'Arlot is one of my favorite producers. They have been doing incredibly consistently good wines across the board and from vintage to vintage. Best of all, they're not overpriced yet.
OPINION
April 27, 2007
Re "Arizona -- it's the new Nevada," April 24 My husband and I left Los Angeles and moved to Madison, Wis., 11 years ago to find a very nice home in a good neighborhood on our combined income of about $70,000. We bought a 4,700-square-foot, four-bedroom home for $220,000, which is now appraised at $386,000. We could never have afforded such a home if we had remained in Los Angeles. In the beginning, I wondered what a Venice High School and UCLA graduate was doing in Madison, but in time I found the city to be a very good fit for two committed liberals.
SPORTS
April 25, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Bryn Renner takes his role as North Carolina's quarterback seriously. Perhaps he has a soft spot in his heart for fainting goats. Or maybe he just thought the whole thing was stupid. For whatever reason, Renner didn't seem to appreciate it one day in practice last fall when every player on the field, except him, fell to the ground and rolled over as soon as the ball was snapped. Renner reacted by slamming the ball to the ground and running downfield. On his way back, he batted the ball away with his helmet and refused to take high-fives from his teammates.
SPORTS
September 27, 1989 | SAM FARMER, Times Staff Writer
Although it might seem ludicrous to the Calabasas High defense, Colin Havert claims that he has a soft spot. To be sure, there are no soft spots on Havert's 6-foot, 200-pound, diamond-hard frame. But Chaminade's senior tailback has a soft spot in his heart. That's why Chaminade's final touchdown in a 48-0 thumping of Calabasas last Friday hurt him more than it hurt Calabasas. It was his sixth, yes, sixth touchdown of the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Meg James
Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. has long been a company divided. The media monolith's financial foundation rests on profits from television channels, satellite TV operations, and a movie and television production unit. But Murdoch -- the company's chief executive, who got his start in newspapers in his native Australia -- has long had a soft spot for publishing, a soft spot not generally shared by Wall Street. On Tuesday, News Corp. confirmed that it was "considering a restructuring to separate its business into two distinct publicly traded companies.
SPORTS
August 11, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
There's a unique vibe to a Jered Weaver start, something his teammates notice. "There's no stress about it," outfielder Torii Hunter said. Weaver has won each of his last nine starts, one short of the team record held by Chuck Finley. Sunday afternoon, Weaver takes the Angels Stadium mound against fellow Long Beach State product Jason Vargas (12-8, 3.69 earned-run average) of the Seattle Mariners. Weaver routinely downplays individual accolades, but he's compiling a remarkable season, leading the American League in wins and ERA (15-1, 2.13 ERA)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Meg James
Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. has long been a company divided. The media monolith's financial foundation rests on profits from television channels, satellite TV operations, and a movie and television production unit. But Murdoch -- the company's chief executive, who got his start in newspapers in his native Australia -- has long had a soft spot for publishing, a soft spot not generally shared by Wall Street. On Tuesday, News Corp. confirmed that it was "considering a restructuring to separate its business into two distinct publicly traded companies.
TRAVEL
June 19, 2011 | By Rosemary McClure, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the age-old war between cats and dogs, the Fidos of America have scored another victory. Their triumph revolves around the nation's bed-and-breakfast owners. Long a bastion of anti-pet sentiment, the B&B industry has grown so fond of dogs that it's luring them with special toys, treats and cushy beds. Cats, meanwhile, are rarely invited anywhere. This makes my pal Darby, a handsome Wheaten terrier, giddy. He loves to travel and hates felines, so he's only too happy to hit the road and check out places to stay, especially places that don't allow cats.
OPINION
February 20, 2011 | By Ralph Frammolino
In the fall of 1973, a package arrived in a Rome newsroom. Delayed by an Italian postal strike, its contents had begun to spoil. Inside were a lock of red hair and a piece of rotting flesh. It bore a telltale freckle. The flesh was an ear belonging to the grandson of J. Paul Getty. One of the richest men in the world, Getty had publicly refused to negotiate with the men who had kidnapped the younger Getty in Rome three months before. Now the oilman agreed to pay $2.2 million, the most he claimed could be deducted from his taxes as a theft loss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2010 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
It took a while for Joseph C. Lopez to find his place in life. When he did, the young man everyone called Joey asked his older brother, Arthur Pratti, to go with him to the Marine Corps recruitment office. An Air Force veteran, Pratti said Lopez, of the Antelope Valley community of Rosamond, was "trying to find his way. " "It took him a while to find his niche in the world. Before he joined the Marines, he was doing a lot of little things," said Pratti, 30. "I wouldn't say he had a troubled past, but he never really found his niche till he became a Marine.
SPORTS
November 6, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
The Dodgers and the Angels both say they have money to spend this off-season. And both acknowledge they have holes to fill. But that doesn't mean they will have enough cash to buy what they need when the free-agent marketplace opens for business late Saturday night Pacific time. Dodgers General Manager Ned Colletti plans to do much of his shopping in the pitching aisle, where there are few bargains to be found this time of year. "Pitching is a priority ? both starters and relievers," he said.
SPORTS
August 11, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
There's a unique vibe to a Jered Weaver start, something his teammates notice. "There's no stress about it," outfielder Torii Hunter said. Weaver has won each of his last nine starts, one short of the team record held by Chuck Finley. Sunday afternoon, Weaver takes the Angels Stadium mound against fellow Long Beach State product Jason Vargas (12-8, 3.69 earned-run average) of the Seattle Mariners. Weaver routinely downplays individual accolades, but he's compiling a remarkable season, leading the American League in wins and ERA (15-1, 2.13 ERA)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO Gov. Gray Davis won't know for certain until Tuesday night which Republican will be pounding on him this fall. But he already knows his soft spot. And that's energy. Those $43-billion long-term power contracts, in particular, are political losers. Never mind that they helped get California through last summer with air conditioning, while stabilizing the market and forcing down the spot price of electricity. Most voters aren't buying it. They agree with Davis' critics: He purchased too much juice for too many years at too high a cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2010 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Cut to the core of the contest for California governor and you'll find that each candidate has one very vulnerable weak spot. For Democrat Jerry Brown, it's his old age. For Republican Meg Whitman, it's her shameful record of not voting in elections. Career politician? Business background? Backed by labor? Gender? None are very big factors, according to the nonpartisan Field Poll. Field's latest statewide survey shows that Atty. Gen. Brown and former EBay chief Whitman are in a virtual dead heat roughly four months before the November election: Brown 44%, Whitman 43%. Most intriguing is the poll's measuring of the candidates' strengths and weaknesses.
OPINION
December 24, 2009
To many of those who remember Ronald Reagan's presidency, his latter-day popularity is a little puzzling. The Republican icon, who like George W. Bush produced skyrocketing federal deficits by advocating tax cuts even as he hiked military spending and -- also like Bush -- promoted laissez-faire regulatory policies that culminated in a home-loan crisis, is today so widely admired that even Democrats such as President Obama frequently praise him....
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