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BUSINESS
March 16, 2000
* Less than two months after entering the electronic book market, Gemstar International Group of Pasadena announced a long-term deal Wednesday to develop new generations of e-book readers with longtime partner Thomson Multimedia. The two firms will jointly develop and introduce new versions of the Rocket EBook and the SoftBook Reader, which were initially developed by companies Gemstar acquired in January, NuvoMedia and SoftBook Press. * * EBay Inc.
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BUSINESS
November 25, 2000 | Associated Press
Barnes & Noble Inc. acknowledged that it is holding talks with Gemstar-TV Guide International about ways to cooperate in selling e-books, including a possible merger. Earlier this week, the bookselling giant denied a report in the Wall Street Journal saying the two companies were discussing a merger. But spokeswoman Mary Ellen Keating said the talks have expanded since then.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the top maker of electronic guides for listing television programs, inventor of the VCR Plus system for recording TV shows and the soon-to-be owner of TV Guide magazine, Gemstar International Group wouldn't be an obvious candidate to promote a pastime that competes with television viewing.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
Who says NuvoMedia's Rocket eBook is just for books? Some folks in Hollywood think the portable device can make bulky paper scripts as much of a relic as silent films. The idea to turn the eBook into E-Scripts came from James Korris, the new executive director of USC's Entertainment Technology Center. Korris, a technology junkie, said he started fiddling with his eBook and his script-writing software to see if they were compatible.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Someday, books printed on paper will be replaced by lightweight digital readers that can store hundreds of titles, download books from the Web that cost a fraction of the price of their pulpy ancestors, and even eliminate the need for a light while reading in bed at night. That day is still far away. I spent a couple of weeks testing two electronic books now on the market: NuvoMedia's Rocket EBook and the SoftBook Reader by SoftBook Press.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1998 | BRAD SKILLMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Straight from the pages of science fiction, electronic books will land in the public's eye this fall with promises of searchable text and the ability to hold the equivalent of 10, if not hundreds, of volumes in a portable device weighing only a few pounds. Books that have been taken out of print could soon be available electronically. Readers frustrated by the minuscule type on the pages will be able to increase the size to their comfort level. This fall, NuvoMedia Inc.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
There are certain product categories that on the surface seem like a dumb idea. But as a product reviewer, I try to keep an open mind until I have a chance to test the item. For example, I was skeptical about WebTV, a device that lets you surf the Net from a television set. But after I installed it in my living room, I discovered that it actually provides a reasonably good experience. The same was true about hand-held electronic devices that store and display book text.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a bibliophile's worst nightmare--fiction available only online. The frightening scenario for book lovers played out Tuesday, courtesy of master of horror Stephen King. The Maine author released his 16,000-word story "Riding the Bullet" exclusively over the Internet for $2.50. The tale, which would be 66 pages in traditional book form, is described by King as "a ghost story in the grand manner," recounting the experience of a young man who hitches a ride with a driver from "the other side."
BUSINESS
November 30, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Skeptical investors who have squeezed billions of dollars of value out of Internet companies have turned their doubtful eyes toward the once-invincible stock of Gemstar-TV Guide International. After the Pasadena-based company began touting its technology for interactive television program guides in 1998, its stock steadily climbed from a split-adjusted price of about $10 to an all-time high of $107.44 in March.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2000 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen King, who in March became the first author to pen a best-selling electronic book, will make another bold step today by selling the first 10,000 words of a suspense tale called "The Plant" on his Web site. This time King is going it alone, forsaking bookstores, online retailers and even his longtime publisher, Simon & Schuster, which sold half a million encrypted copies of his previous e-book, "Riding the Bullet."
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