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Softdesk Inc

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BUSINESS
April 1, 1997
San Rafael-based Autodesk Inc. completed its acquisition of Softdesk Inc. after striking an agreement to resolve federal antitrust concerns about the combination of competitors in the market for computer-aided design software. The companies agreed to sell a key Softdesk software program to another company, protecting competition in the market for design software used architecture and engineering industries. . . . La Jolla Pharmaceutical Co.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Autodesk Inc., a leading maker of computer software used by architects and design engineers, disclosed that the Federal Trade Commission is investigating its business practices. The San Rafael-based firm said no charges have been filed and that it is cooperating with the probe. An FTC spokeswoman declined to comment. The firm said it does not believe its share of the annual $7-billion market for computer-aided design, or CAD, software poses any antitrust problem.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Autodesk Inc. said it agreed to buy Softdesk Inc. for about $72 million in stock. Softdesk, of Henniker, N.H., makes architectural and engineering software and had revenue of $26.5 million for the nine months ended Sept. 30. Autodesk, a San Rafael-based software maker, said it would issue 0.44 shares for each Softdesk share in the transaction. Based on closing stock prices Tuesday, the deal values Softdesk at $12 a share. Softdesk stock closed at $9.75, up 50 cents on the Nasdaq Stock Market.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995
* Trish Bartel has joined Chapman General Hospital in Orange as director of business development. She was formerly director of marketing and strategic planning at Saint John's Hospital and Health Center in Santa Monica. * Charles E. Moran has been named president of Irvine-based National Education Corp.'s corporate training subsidiary, National Education Training Group in Naperville, Ill. He succeeds Robert Soto, who has resigned.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1995 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER
In the Disney classic, the redoubtable nanny Mary Poppins told her charges that "a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down." But a Penn State chemical engineer says ultrasound and electric fields could work even better, at least when it comes to transporting medicine through your skin via trans-dermal patches. Such patches are already on the market for motion sickness, quitting smoking and hormone replacement therapy.
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