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Softview Inc

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BUSINESS
February 4, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Lane, president of Softview Inc., an Oxnard computer software company, is wagering that her company will make a bundle on the Internal Revenue Service's campaign to encourage taxpayers to file their tax forms electronically, instead of by mail. Until now, Softview, with $3.8 million in sales last year, has grown nicely by becoming the only company that makes a complete tax preparation software kit that works on the popular Apple Macintosh home computer.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Lane, president of Softview Inc., an Oxnard computer software company, is wagering that her company will make a bundle on the Internal Revenue Service's campaign to encourage taxpayers to file their tax forms electronically, instead of by mail. Until now, Softview, with $3.8 million in sales last year, has grown nicely by becoming the only company that makes a complete tax preparation software kit that works on the popular Apple Macintosh home computer.
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NEWS
March 15, 1987 | RICHARD O'REILLY and LAWRENCE J. MAGID, Richard O'Reilly designs microcomputer applications for The Times. Lawrence J. Magid is vice president and senior analyst at Seybold Group, a computer consulting and publication firm.
If you hate paying income taxes--and who doesn't?--no computer program is going to turn it into a pleasurable experience. But a good software package can make the task a little less onerous, and some can point the way toward reducing your tax burden next year. One highly regarded tax preparation program for IBM PC and compatible computers is TurboTax, published by ChipSoft Inc., while in the Apple Macintosh world, MacInTax from Softview Inc. is a clear winner.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1988 | Richard O'Reilly, RICHARD O'REILLY designs microcomputer applications for The Times
Like it or not, filling out forms is a fact of life in most offices. It also is a task for which the computer has been of little use because of the difficulty in matching up paper forms with computer screens and computer printers. That is quickly changing, however, thanks to a new category of software that has helped automate this type of paper work. Three recently introduced forms processing programs reflect three different approaches: FormSet from Softview Inc.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | RICHARD O'REILLY, Times Staff Writer
Using a personal computer to prepare your income tax returns seems like a natural. It is faster than doing taxes by hand, neater and free of arithmetic errors. But even with Ask Dan, the only program that gives tax advice, it isn't like sitting across the desk from a tax accountant. If you already do your taxes by hand and have a computer, you may want to try one of the three tax preparation programs reviewed here--TaxView/MacInTax, TurboTax, or Ask Dan. TurboTax, $75, published by ChipSoft Inc.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Softview Inc., an Oxnard company that makes do-it-yourself tax preparation computer software, has a knack for jumping into untried markets. Last year, Softview confidently predicted that it would double its sales by getting into the electronic tax filing business. The company provided software that helped a San Diego firm transmit taxpayers' forms to the Internal Revenue Service and got a fee for each transmission. (Softview has a similar arrangement with a different company this year.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1988 | Lawrence J. Magid, Lawrence J. Magid is a Silicon Valley-based computer analyst and writer
The movie industry has its Oscar, television has its Emmy and the music business has its Grammy. What does the computer industry have? The Software Publishers Assn.'s "Excellence in Software" awards, which were announced last month during an Academy Awards-style, black-tie dinner at Oakland's Claremont Hotel. The annual software awards may lack the sizzle of the honors that Hollywood bestows.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
There are probably many ways to insult a computer programmer--just try calling one a "propeller head"--but none is more sure to do the job than describing his work as "spaghetti code." "Never, never say that," warns Susan Morgan, president of Softview Inc., a Camarillo publisher of top-selling income tax programs for personal computers. "That's saying he's an amateur who doesn't know what he's doing."
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | RICHARD O'REILLY, Times Staff Writer
Analyzing this year's crop of tax preparation software for personal computers turned out to be like the new tax law itself--difficult and confusing. Tax preparation software ought to be more useful than ever because preparing the new tax forms has become more complicated. But using such programs may, in fact, make the chore more difficult. Two popular programs actually produced erroneous returns. A third came with a physically flawed disk.
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