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BUSINESS
April 11, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Software engineers have the best jobs, writing code for operating systems and apps at companies such as Apple and Facebook, according to a new CareerCast list. Lumberjacks, who deal with high unemployment and constant danger, aren't as lucky. The job search site ranked 200 jobs by considering factors such as work environment, income, stress levels, market outlook and physical demands: Is crawling or stooping involved? Toxic fumes or noise? Do employees work in a confined space? Is the position competitive?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 17, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
It pays to work for Google. The tech firm topped a list of the highest-paid software engineers, with an average base salary of $128,336. Facebook was second with an average base salary of $123,626, followed by Apple in the No. 3 spot at $114,413. The salary data were released Wednesday by Glassdoor, which used salary reports shared over the last 12 months by software engineers at 15 tech companies. The data are based on anonymous reports voluntarily shared by current and recent employees.
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BUSINESS
October 17, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
It pays to work for Google. The tech firm topped a list of the highest-paid software engineers, with an average base salary of $128,336. Facebook was second with an average base salary of $123,626, followed by Apple in the No. 3 spot at $114,413. The salary data were released Wednesday by Glassdoor, which used salary reports shared over the last 12 months by software engineers at 15 tech companies. The data are based on anonymous reports voluntarily shared by current and recent employees.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple, Google, Intel, Pixar and other high-tech companies will face an antitrust lawsuit that alleges they illegally conspired not to poach each other's staffers. San Jose U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh rejected a motion to dismiss the claims Wednesday night. In a 29-page opinion, she ruled that the “Do Not Cold Call” agreements among the defendants probably resulted “from collusion, and not from coincidence.” Other defendants include Adobe, Intuit, and Lucasfilm.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1999 | DENISE HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those looking for work in the hot field of software engineering need more than a degree and aptitude to find the best jobs. "There's incredible demand, but employers are still very picky," said John Arany, an assistant director of career services at Cal State Northridge who specializes in computer science jobs. "They want very specific languages and systems and software. The hot languages now include C, C++, Java and HTML," Arany explained. "The Unix operating system is very popular.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple, Google, Intel, Pixar and other high-tech companies will face an antitrust lawsuit that alleges they illegally conspired not to poach each other's staffers. San Jose U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh rejected a motion to dismiss the claims Wednesday night. In a 29-page opinion, she ruled that the “Do Not Cold Call” agreements among the defendants probably resulted “from collusion, and not from coincidence.” Other defendants include Adobe, Intuit, and Lucasfilm.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2006
Siebel Systems Inc., which in January was bought by Oracle Corp. of Redwood Shores, Calif., has agreed to pay as much as $27.5 million to settle claims that the firm failed to give 800 of its software engineers overtime pay.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Software companies were a major engine of job growth last year, and some of the highest salaries in the industry are paid to software engineers on the West Coast, according to a survey conducted by Coopers & Lybrand, an accounting and consulting firm. Software firms expanded their work forces by an average 34% in 1995, compared with typical job growth of 5% among Fortune 500 companies, according to the survey of 500 software companies throughout the United States.
OPINION
July 13, 2007
Re "So long, software jobs," editorial, July 10 Business leaders are always complaining that we have too many lawyers and not enough engineers, yet major law firms are now paying new grads $165,000 a year to start, while an engineer with a master's degree would be extremely lucky to earn even half that amount.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1995
"Ignorance Is Bliss in the High-Tech Marketplace" (Dec. 29) by columnist Michael Schrage argues that technological ignorance is the dominant driver of the computer industry, and the changing nature of the consumer demands simplicity because we do not have the knowledge, skills or patience necessary to use computers. However, there is a fundamental flaw in his philosophy toward information technology. Computers are just a tool; they are not the purpose of the user's intent. Rather, they are "enablers"--they allow people to better perform the tasks they are educated for. The role of understanding the sophisticated computer environment is for software engineers who create the user interface.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Recent college graduates looking for entry-level work will have an easier time job-hunting than earlier alumni, recent reports are finding. But the students who will make the most money when they emerge from school will be the ones with math- and science-related majors. Engineering, business and science graduates often end up commanding some of the highest salaries, according to a new study conducted by three Yale University professors for the National Bureau of Economic Research. Software engineers were deemed by CareerCast last week to have the best jobs.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Software engineers have the best jobs, writing code for operating systems and apps at companies such as Apple and Facebook, according to a new CareerCast list. Lumberjacks, who deal with high unemployment and constant danger, aren't as lucky. The job search site ranked 200 jobs by considering factors such as work environment, income, stress levels, market outlook and physical demands: Is crawling or stooping involved? Toxic fumes or noise? Do employees work in a confined space? Is the position competitive?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
John Tyner knows he's at minute 14.5 of his headlong rush into the national spotlight. And he couldn't be happier. An audio recording capturing Tyner's don't-touch-my-junk showdown with San Diego airport security screeners a week ago brought the software engineer instant celebrity. His story has been featured on all the major news and late-night comedy shows. Bloggers have alternately praised and excoriated him. A "Don't Touch My Junk?and Don't Touch My Kid's Junk, Either" T-shirt is reportedly selling quickly on the Internet.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. fired a software engineer for snooping on its users' private information, the Internet search giant confirmed Wednesday. The 27-year-old employee, David Barksdale, allegedly accessed information about four teenagers he met through a Seattle technology group, according to gossip website Gawker, which reported the incident Tuesday. Barksdale, a self-described hacker whose job was to maintain and troubleshoot Google sites, had access to users' personal accounts and information, Gawker reported.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
He was a 53-year-old software engineer who played bass in a local band and lived what by all appearances was a quiet suburban life here with his wife, who taught piano at home, and her young daughter. But, for several decades, Joe Stack also had been battling the Internal Revenue Service -- and nursing a grudge. And on Thursday morning, he acted. After setting fire to the family home, he drove to the municipal airport, slid into the cockpit of his single-engine Piper Cherokee and took off into the clear blue sky over Austin, authorities said.
SPORTS
July 5, 2009 | Ben Bolch
Seventy years old. Balding. Probably couldn't run a 10-minute mile. Yet Robert Helfman proved every bit as deft as any athletic 17-year-old in the days leading up to one of Crenshaw High's biggest track and field meets of the spring. Greeting Cougars sprinters in their locker room were photos Helfman had taken of the team's loss to archrival Dorsey in the 400-meter relay at an earlier meet. And these words, compliments of Coach David Frierson: "Forgive but do not forget."
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
In the high-flying days of just a few years ago, recalled one old-timer at Hughes Aircraft Co.'s Ground Systems Group in Fullerton, a software engineer looking for a job was likely to be hired first and only later evaluated for the actual job placement. "We needed them everywhere; it almost didn't matter," explained spokesman Dan Reeder. "The hard part was finding them." But that was a few years ago.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Recent college graduates looking for entry-level work will have an easier time job-hunting than earlier alumni, recent reports are finding. But the students who will make the most money when they emerge from school will be the ones with math- and science-related majors. Engineering, business and science graduates often end up commanding some of the highest salaries, according to a new study conducted by three Yale University professors for the National Bureau of Economic Research. Software engineers were deemed by CareerCast last week to have the best jobs.
OPINION
July 13, 2007
Re "So long, software jobs," editorial, July 10 Business leaders are always complaining that we have too many lawyers and not enough engineers, yet major law firms are now paying new grads $165,000 a year to start, while an engineer with a master's degree would be extremely lucky to earn even half that amount.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2006
Siebel Systems Inc., which in January was bought by Oracle Corp. of Redwood Shores, Calif., has agreed to pay as much as $27.5 million to settle claims that the firm failed to give 800 of its software engineers overtime pay.
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