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BUSINESS
August 12, 1985
The Financial Accounting Standards Board said it adopted the standards because it was concerned about the divergence of accounting practices within the fast-growing industry. The new rules will have financial implications for the firms, requiring them to begin capitalizing production costs at a certain point in the new-product development process. Some computer-software firms had treated the entire development cost as a research and development expense, a way of increasing cash flow.
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OPINION
February 8, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Bill Gates wants you to feel much better about the future of mankind. Things are looking up, he says, way up. "By almost any measure, the world is better than it has ever been," Gates wrote in his annual letter chronicling the work of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, through which he plans to give away most of the fortune he made from Microsoft. "People are living longer, healthier lives. Many nations that were aid recipients are now self-sufficient," he wrote. "By 2035, there will be almost no poor countries left in the world.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Officials of the leading computer software industry trade group, accusing International Business Machines of unfair trade practices, will discuss today whether to take up their complaints with U.S. and European governmental agencies. The trade group, Adapso, says IBM is withholding critical information that would allow competitors to make compatible products and is locking up the software market by bundling programs into one-price packages.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2009 | Alex Pham
Only a few years ago, bigger guns, badder enemies and louder explosives mattered most in video games. Now, small is beautiful, and Apple Inc.'s iPhone is largely responsible. The surprising emergence of the iPhone and its phone-less sibling, the iPod Touch, as hand-held game consoles has started to change the dynamics of the $40-billion game software industry.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, LAWRENCE J. MAGID is a Silicon Valley-based computer analyst and writer
The day after the motion picture industry celebrated its Academy Awards, the software industry followed suit with a similar event. Although not nationally televised, the Software Publishers Assn. Awards was also a black-tie event, held at the Hotel del Coronado in San Diego and hosted by Saturday Night Live's newscaster, Dennis Miller. Three honors--best simulation program, best entertainment program and best curricular program--went to SimCity, the City Simulator.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
This is my last technology column--I've taken a job covering the chip business in Silicon Valley. I've had an interesting tour of duty in Silicon Beach or whatever nickname high-tech entrepreneurs are using these days for Orange County. Over the past four years, I've seen the county's high-tech landscape undergo a radical change. When I started working here, the newsmakers were computer systems and components manufacturers like AST Research Inc., Advanced Logic Research Inc.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shannon Jenkins makes her annual pilgrimage from Orange County to the Comdex computer show in Las Vegas this week. She is optimistic about the trip, in part because her company doesn't actually make computers. Jenkins, chief executive of Touchstone Software Corp., is in the business of publishing the programs, or software, that permit computers to operate.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In filing suit to block Microsoft's acquisition of Intuit Inc., the Justice Department has slowed the software giant's march to take over more and more of the computer industry--and left many a Microsoft competitor breathing a sigh of relief. But for all those who are gleeful over Microsoft's stumble, there are many, too, who lament the devastating blow dealt to Intuit, once among the personal computer industry's most innovative software outfits.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As IBM Corp. on Tuesday launched its $3.3-billion tender offer for Lotus Development Corp., some in the industry were waxing nostalgic about the early days of the industry, when all a would-be software mogul needed was a program and a dream.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending the most important antitrust investigation of the past decade, the Justice Department announced Saturday that Microsoft Corp., the world's largest maker of computer software, had agreed to end marketing practices that "choked off competition and preserved its monopoly position." Industry experts and government lawyers predicted that the settlement will increase competition and spur innovation in the software industry and lower prices for consumers.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2007 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Mark Pincus may hold a winning hand with his latest Internet venture. More than 130,000 Facebook users a day play an online version of Texas Hold 'Em that the San Francisco entrepreneur created at his kitchen table while his American bulldog, Zinga, slept at his feet. This is not the poker of smoky backrooms or illicit gambling sites but a free, friendly game at one of the Internet's hottest hangouts, Facebook. Chips serve as social currency: The more you win, the bigger the swagger.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2005 | From Reuters
The U.S. music, movie and software industries called for the first time Wednesday for the United States to begin legal action against China at the World Trade Organization to stop widespread piracy they said cost them at least $2.5 billion in 2004. In a formal filing to the U.S. trade representative's office, the International Intellectual Property Alliance said the Bush administration should ask China for immediate consultations on the issue at the WTO.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp. said Monday that it would revamp its $13.1-billion software business, second in sales to Microsoft Corp., next month to win more sales to bigger customers. The company's 13,000-member software sales force and 20,000 software engineers will spend more time developing programs for specific industries rather than just general products such as database or server software, spokesman Tim Breuer said. No jobs will be lost at Armonk, N.Y.-based IBM as a result, he said.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2002 | Pham-Duy Nguyen, Bloomberg News
Dmitry Sklyarov, the Moscow software programmer who wrote the code that cracked Adobe Systems Inc.'s eBook, is back in the United States more than a year after he was arrested on software piracy charges. Sklyarov, who spent weeks in jail in 2001 on charges that he violated a 1998 digital copyright law, will tell a jury that his employer, ElcomSoft Co., didn't commit a crime when it sold software on the Internet that could disable restrictions on Adobe's eBook software.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2001 | PETER D. ZIMMERMAN, Peter D. Zimmerman, a physicist, was the State Department's science advisor for arms control during the Clinton administration
The United States once had a consumer electronics industry turning out stereo systems, speakers and recorders. Now most equipment comes from low-wage countries that captured the market in a rapid series of waves, beginning with Japanese products in the 1960s. Five years after the first Japanese-made stereo equipment was marketed in the U.S., there was little American-made hardware left to buy. It would be nice to build stereos again, but it is unnecessary to U.S. prosperity.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2000 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a year of conflict, a campaign by America Online, Microsoft and other powerful software companies to pass legislation dramatically limiting the rights of software buyers appears to have stalled in the face of growing opposition. Half a dozen states this year have considered the controversial legislation, which would allow software companies to ban the sale of used software, avoid fixing software bugs and even block the publication of critical reviews of their products.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PDA Engineering Inc., continuing the consolidation in the engineering software industry, said Tuesday that it has agreed to be acquired by a Los Angeles company for about $65.8 million in corporate IOUs. MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., the industry's biggest player, said it would pay $6.85 a share for PDA by issuing debt securities to shareholders, who must give the deal their approval.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2000 | DAVID KOENIG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two rivals in the business-to-business software industry said Monday that they will merge in what they billed as the sector's biggest combination ever, a $9.3-billion stock-for-stock deal. Dallas-based I2 Technologies Inc. said it will buy Aspect Development Inc., based in Mountain View, Calif., to boost its business of linking manufacturers and their suppliers on the Internet. The purchase price--a 35% premium over the companies' closing stock prices Friday--caught analysts by surprise.
NEWS
November 9, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp. may have been a ferocious competitor in the software industry, as U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson depicts in his antitrust ruling. But in many other businesses in which the software behemoth has expended billions of dollars to win market share for its products, it has been more of a paper tiger. Its Microsoft Network service remains a distant fourth among Internet service providers, about one-tenth the size of its most powerful rival, America Online Inc.
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