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BUSINESS
April 22, 1994 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Platinum Software Corp. seemed aptly named. Just last year, with demand for its popular accounting software growing rapidly, Platinum tripled its payroll, made seven acquisitions and reported $39 million in annual revenue. But with Monday's announcement that the company's top managers had resigned and that Platinum had overstated its revenue for 15 months, the company's explosive growth drew closer attention--as did its architect, Gerald R.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 1994 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Platinum Software Corp. seemed aptly named. Just last year, the Irvine maker of accounting software tripled its payroll, made seven acquisitions and reported $39 million in revenue. But with Monday's announcement that the company's top managers quit and that Platinum had overstated revenue for 15 months, Platinum's explosive growth drew closer attention--as did its architect, Gerald R. Blackie, the firm's founder, who stepped aside as chairman and chief executive.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
One call to the Piracy Hot Line is all it takes for the Software Police to come knocking at your computers. Parametrix Inc. of Seattle found that out last year when the Software Police, also known as the Software Publishers Assn., showed up with a search warrant and a U.S. marshal to audit their computers. The search turned up dozens of copies of unauthorized software programs and meant a penalty of $350,000 for Parametrix.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget about undercover agents, secret police and industrial spies. The latest foot soldiers in the long-running battle against software piracy are decidedly untrained, and perhaps even a bit unorthodox. But, unmotivated they are not. The Software Publishers Assn., home of the generals of the software industry, is turning to disgruntled employees of corporate America to pursue its crusade against those who would make, use or sell illegal copies of personal computer programs.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
One call to the Piracy Hot Line is all it takes for the Software Police to come knocking at your computers. Parametrix Inc. of Seattle found that out last year when the Software Police, also known as the Software Publishers Assn., showed up with a search warrant and a U.S. marshal to audit their computers. The search turned up dozens of copies of unauthorized software programs and meant a penalty of $350,000 for Parametrix.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A software industry group formed to fight piracy said Tuesday that it has settled a copyright infringement lawsuit against Advanced Business Microsystems Inc., an Irvine company that supplies accounting software. ABM has agreed to pay $85,000 to the Software Publishers Assn., a Washington-based trade group. The group uses the fund to pursue litigation against companies suspected of pirating software and to educate the public about copyright laws, said Terri Childs, a SPA spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A software industry group formed to fight piracy said Tuesday that it has settled a copyright infringement lawsuit against Advanced Business Microsystems Inc., an Irvine company that supplies accounting software. ABM has agreed to pay $85,000 to the Software Publishers Assn., a Washington-based trade group. The group uses the fund to pursue litigation against companies suspected of pirating software and to educate the public about copyright laws, said Terri Childs, a SPA spokeswoman.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget about undercover agents, secret police and industrial spies. The latest foot soldiers in the long-running battle against software piracy are decidedly untrained, and perhaps even a bit unorthodox. But, unmotivated they are not. The Software Publishers Assn., home of the generals of the software industry, is turning to disgruntled employees of corporate America to pursue its crusade against those who would make, use or sell illegal copies of personal computer programs.
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