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Sohn Kee Chung

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August 23, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The opportunity to speak with Sohn Kee Chung is the opportunity to hear a lesson in 20th-Century Korean history, and that is what he gave as he entertained guests at his modern sixth-floor apartment in a middle-class part of the city. Outside, although it was Saturday morning, children who were dressed in uniforms walked with various degrees of enthusiasm toward school for a half-day of studies, and street vendors sold Heinz ketchup, Smuckers jam, Velveeta cheese and other U.S.
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SPORTS
August 23, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The opportunity to speak with Sohn Kee Chung is the opportunity to hear a lesson in 20th-Century Korean history, and that is what he gave as he entertained guests at his modern sixth-floor apartment in a middle-class part of the city. Outside, although it was Saturday morning, children who were dressed in uniforms walked with various degrees of enthusiasm toward school for a half-day of studies, and street vendors sold Heinz ketchup, Smuckers jam, Velveeta cheese and other U.S.
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SPORTS
August 14, 2004 | Associated Press
Carriers of the torch used to light the Olympic flame at the opening ceremony over the last 20 years: SALT LAKE CITY, 2002: The 1980 gold-medal winning U.S. hockey team, reunited for the first Winter Games in the United States since their Lake Placid victory. SYDNEY, Australia, 2000: Olympic runner Cathy Freeman, an aboriginal Australian, who then went on to win the gold medal in the women's 400 meters.
SPORTS
August 10, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the minds of South Koreans, history corrected itself in the men's marathon Sunday. The last time a Korean had won this race was in 1936, when Japanese troops occupied his nation. In that Olympic marathon, Sohn Kee Chung was forced to wear a Japanese uniform and take a Japanese name, Kitei Son. When he won the 26.2-mile race, the Japanese flag was raised and the Japanese anthem played.
SPORTS
April 10, 1996 | MAL FLORENCE
When the Dodgers' Chan Ho Park became the first Korean-born pitcher to win a major league game Saturday, it was reported that the feat was as significant as wrestler Jung Mo Yang becoming the country's first gold medalist in the 1976 Olympic Games. However, it's debatable whether that distinction belongs to Sohn Kee Chung, who won the marathon at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Korea was, at the time, occupied by Japanese forces, according to David Wallechinsky's "Book of the Olympics."
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | MIKE RABUN, United Press International
South Korea's longed-for moment on the world stage arrived Saturday with the start of the Olympics, a 16-day global festival featuring the largest number of competitors in the event's 96-year history. "After seven years of preparation, difficulties and hope," IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch said during the opening ceremony, "we are finally gathered in this wonderful Olympic Stadium to celebrate together the solemn opening of this great festival of friendship--the Olympic Games.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1988 | ALEENE MacMINN, Times Television Editor
The last time NBC was scheduled to telecast the Summer Olympics, the United States boycotted and the network had to stay home with the athletes. Eight years later, the network finds itself preparing to cover the XXIV Summer Olympics here amid tight security precautions against potential disruptions. The heavy security was apparent Tuesday as a group of about 30 U.S. journalists toured the impressive Seoul Sports Complex and the nearby Olympic Park.
SPORTS
September 28, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY
For a straight-ahead 100-meter runner, Great Britain's Linford Christie has an aptitude for ducking, weaving and, occasionally, jabbing. That, combined with his victories in the Summer Olympics at Barcelona and the World Cup at Havana, should earn him the No. 1 ranking among 100-meter runners this year. But we would feel better about it if he had not chosen to avoid Carl Lewis for the last two months of the track and field season.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | DAVID L. WOLPER, Special to The Times: David L. Wolper is a motion picture and television producer. He was a vice president of the L.A. Olympic Organizing Committee and producer of the opening and closing ceremonies in 1984.
Four years ago, as the Los Angeles Olympic opening ceremony came to an end, I looked onto the field from my control booth high above the Coliseum floor. Fifteen thousand people--athletes, dancers, singers, placard bearers and members of Los Angeles' diverse ethnic community--were all holding hands, dancing, singing and yes, many crying. It was an overwhelming display of emotion. A conclusion to a goose-bump-filled ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1992 | SHEILA K. JOHNSON, Sheila K. Johnson is an anthropologist and the author of "The Japanese Through American Eyes" (Stanford University Press)
Japanese culture well knows the power of the apology. Criminals draw reduced sentences if they apologize and show remorse. Business leaders save their companies from the wrath of stockholders by bowing deeply and apologizing for their misdeeds. Politicians save their careers and survive to run again by apologizing for anything from having accepted bribes to keeping mistresses. Even miscreant husbands can re-enter the good graces of their wives by sufficiently abject mea culpas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
So far, about a 9.7. That's the mark that NBC has earned for its fine early coverage of the Seoul Summer Olympics that began with Friday's spectacular opening ceremony. So far, about .7. That's the mark that KNBC-TV Channel 4 has earned for its Laurel and Hardy act at the XXIV Olympiad. Anchorman John Beard boasted on the air Saturday night about Channel 4's live newscasts from Seoul: "No other television station has ever done what we're doing. . . ." Thank God. More about Channel 4 shortly.
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