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Soil Disposal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1993 | KURT PITZER
A judge on Thursday lifted a ban on the planned transfer of 425,000 cubic yards of soil from the Warner Ridge housing project to the Pierce College farm, provided no rodent poisons are brought to the farmland. The ruling by Superior Court Judge Robert O'Brian clears the way for crews to begin preparing a section of the Pierce College farm for fill dirt, which is expected to be moved there starting sometime next month, said Robert McMurry, attorney for the Warner Ridge developer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1993 | KURT PITZER
A judge on Thursday lifted a ban on the planned transfer of 425,000 cubic yards of soil from the Warner Ridge housing project to the Pierce College farm, provided no rodent poisons are brought to the farmland. The ruling by Superior Court Judge Robert O'Brian clears the way for crews to begin preparing a section of the Pierce College farm for fill dirt, which is expected to be moved there starting sometime next month, said Robert McMurry, attorney for the Warner Ridge developer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN
Caltrans officials may never know the identity of the phantom dumper, but at last they have found out what to do with his dirt. The dumper, striking under the cover of darkness, gradually deposited more than 350 tons of dirt on the median of the Glendale Freeway where it ends in Silver Lake. Weeds have sprouted in the dirt since the dumping stopped this spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN
Caltrans officials may never know the identity of the phantom dumper, but at last they have found out what to do with his dirt. The dumper, striking under the cover of darkness, gradually deposited more than 350 tons of dirt on the median of the Glendale Freeway where it ends in Silver Lake. Weeds have sprouted in the dirt since the dumping stopped this spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1996 | DAVID R. BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The immense plastic sheets stretched across local strawberry fields usually end up in the same place as the garbage bags they so closely resemble--buried beneath heaps of rotting trash in the county's landfills. Benn Tsai hand David Goldstein, however, see the sheets, used when growers fumigate their fields, as a valuable resource waiting to be tapped. Or more precisely, hosed down, ground up and recycled.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | GARY GORMAN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of Southern California's main arteries to the north remained closed Monday as emergency workers wearing protective suits and masks struggled to clean up a hazardous chemical spilled in a train derailment Sunday in northern Ventura County. As wrecked cars and train parts lay strewn across the Southern Pacific tracks, Amtrak was forced to cancel local passenger service between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara and to use buses for its popular Coast Starlight service, which travels that route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2003 | Janet Wilson and Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writers
The obstacle-strewn odyssey of San Onofre's decommissioned reactor is just one piece of a looming dilemma: what to do with the remains of America's aging nuclear power plants. That problem will escalate, with more than half of the nation's 103 commercial reactors facing mandatory shutdown in the next three decades, according to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission data compiled by The Times.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | GARY GORMAN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 10-mile stretch of U.S. 101--one of Southern California's main north-south arteries--may reopen late today, officials said Monday as emergency crews began the arduous task of cleaning up a hazardous chemical that spilled during a train derailment here Sunday.
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