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Soil Erosion

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NEWS
March 12, 1985 | United Press International
The Sierra Club said Monday that it will lobby for strong measures in the 1985 farm bill to combat soil erosion--the other "crisis" facing American agriculture. The organization, by lobbying members of Congress who support environmental issues, will make tough conservation measures "one of the requisite elements of any farm bill that will earn their vote this year," Douglas Scott, director of federal affairs for the club, told a news conference.
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NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Ken Burns' latest work, "The Dust Bowl," a two-part documentary that wrapped up Monday night on PBS, told a familiar story to any of us who read John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" in high school, or whose personal histories are tied up in those calamitous Depression-era years when America's Great Plains states were ravaged by drought and soil erosion that prompted an exodus to California and other coastal states. I might not be here if not for that exodus -- my mother was an Okie.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1992
An emergency seeding program to contain soil erosion in the western Antelope Valley was approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. In an unanimous vote, the supervisors agreed to contribute nearly $72,000 toward the project, for which the federal government has already agreed to provide more than $550,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2008 | Catherine Saillant
Winter is on the way, so hillsides burned in the Gap fire near Goleta got a coating of green-tinged hydromulch that was applied by contractors for the U.S. Forest Service. Mulching took place over 13 days starting Sept. 24, with six planes and a helicopter dropping 3.5 million gallons of the sticky gel. The mulch is made of recycled paper, wood fiber, water and a binding agent, and mixed with green dye.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1985 | ROBERT WARRICK, Robert Warrick, a farmer in Meadow Grove, Neb., is chairman of the Sierra Club's agriculture campaign.
If we run out of water, pray for rain. If we run out of soil, pray for forgiveness. -- Old Nebraska saying Every gust of wind, every drop of rain strips precious topsoil from U.S. farmland. Three billion tons of soil are blown or washed away annually, rivaling the damage of the Great Dust Bowl of the 1930s. Farm program reforms are needed to solve this silent crisis of American agriculture in order to protect our agricultural productivity, water quality and fiscal health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1993 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tour was supposed to highlight the potential for flooding and mudslides in fire-stricken areas and, as luck would have it, rain made the message perfectly clear. In fact, Saturday's storm brought such a downpour and blinding mist at some points that it drove the official sightseers away from Saddle Peak Lookout, aborted a foray into Las Flores Canyon and cut short the bus tour sponsored by the Topanga-Las Virgenes Resource Conservation District.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | ANGUS SHAW, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gold fever killed Annah Chayera. Sand and boulders crushed her when a crude, hand-dug mine shaft collapsed in a gold belt known since biblical times. Stuart Simba was luckier. He only got a police bullet in the shoulder while fleeing an illegal dig. A decade of growing unemployment in this southern African country has spurred thousands like them to try their luck at the rivers that crisscross the region.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Ken Burns' latest work, "The Dust Bowl," a two-part documentary that wrapped up Monday night on PBS, told a familiar story to any of us who read John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" in high school, or whose personal histories are tied up in those calamitous Depression-era years when America's Great Plains states were ravaged by drought and soil erosion that prompted an exodus to California and other coastal states. I might not be here if not for that exodus -- my mother was an Okie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1991
Federal agriculture officials said Tuesday that they plan to spend nearly $800,000 in the Antelope Valley in the near future to control problems with soil erosion and blowing dust in the high desert. The Soil Conservation Service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture announced plans to focus on 2,400 acres of parched, abandoned fields that have been a major source of problems. Federal officials will plant seeds, dig furrows and install fences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Elysian Park, the current hot controversy, for a change, has nothing to do with the Dodgers, whose stadium has been a sore point with area residents for years. This time, the hassle is about bikes. The 580-acre park of steep hills northwest of downtown Los Angeles is ground zero in a battle over a pilot program that could lead to the eventual introduction of mountain bikes throughout the city's park system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1993 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tour was supposed to highlight the potential for flooding and mudslides in fire-stricken areas and, as luck would have it, rain made the message perfectly clear. In fact, Saturday's storm brought such a downpour and blinding mist at some points that it drove the official sightseers away from Saddle Peak Lookout, aborted a foray into Las Flores Canyon and cut short the bus tour sponsored by the Topanga-Las Virgenes Resource Conservation District.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vetiver is a coarse, stubborn grass that grows six feet tall and under warm tropical sun may send roots down 12 feet or more. Strangely, this belligerent personality may present it with a bright future. The National Research Council has concluded that the little-known, if far-flung, grass could be a powerful weapon against a major environmental threat: soil erosion from the wind-swept plains of the United States to the African sub-Sahara threatened by the rapidly expanding desert.
NEWS
January 11, 1993
Eastbound lanes of the Garden Grove Freeway from The City Drive to the Santa Ana Freeway were closed Sunday due to soil erosion and were likely to remain closed into this morning's commute, according to Caltrans. The route was closed Sunday at 6:45 p.m. to allow highway construction crews to repair a four-foot hole in the No. 2 lane in the approach to the bridge over the Santa Ana Freeway.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1992 | From Associated Press
Nearly half of all farms surveyed by conservationists were potentially in violation of a law that requires owners to protect their farms from soil erosion or risk losing federal farm benefits. The Soil and Water Conservation Society said it found that 42% to 48% of the farms it surveyed represented potential violations of the government's conservation compliance policy if they are receiving farm program benefits.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trucks loaded with hardwood logs are raising dust on the country roads of southern Chile and alarm among Chileans who want to preserve this country's shrinking native forests. One after the other, the trucks arrive at a plant where a huge machine grinds the bark off the logs, then noisily chews them into small chips used for making paper. Tawny mountains of chips rise by the docks of Puerto Montt, awaiting shipment to Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2008 | Catherine Saillant
Winter is on the way, so hillsides burned in the Gap fire near Goleta got a coating of green-tinged hydromulch that was applied by contractors for the U.S. Forest Service. Mulching took place over 13 days starting Sept. 24, with six planes and a helicopter dropping 3.5 million gallons of the sticky gel. The mulch is made of recycled paper, wood fiber, water and a binding agent, and mixed with green dye.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
Soil erosion and salination have become major causes of diminished productivity of farmland in California that could severely damage the state's $54-billion agriculture industry, a conservation organization warned Thursday. In a report on the state's disappearing agricultural land, the American Farmland Trust, a Washington-based nonprofit conservation foundation, listed urban sprawl, soil erosion, salt buildup and water supply problems as major problems that threaten the state's No. 1 industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1992
An emergency seeding program to contain soil erosion in the western Antelope Valley was approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. In an unanimous vote, the supervisors agreed to contribute nearly $72,000 toward the project, for which the federal government has already agreed to provide more than $550,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1991 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a sandy alfalfa field northwest of Lancaster, Los Angeles County and federal officials demonstrated Monday how they plan to spend nearly $800,000 to control problems with soil erosion and blowing dust in the Antelope Valley. Federal agriculture officials announced last week that they would plant trees, dig furrows and seed and fence 2,400 severely eroded acres of unused farmland between 90th Street West and 110th Street West north of Avenue D.
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