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FOOD
July 14, 2011
Location: 3100 W. 8th St., No. 101, Los Angeles, (213) 383-8855 Prices: Entrees, $10.95 to $16.50; family-style fish plates, $13.50 to $17.50; bossam with oysters, $28.50. Details: Open 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 9:30 p.m. Monday to Saturday. Lot parking. Beer, soju, wine. Visa, MasterCard accepted
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NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Formerly known as the Korean BBQ Cook-Off, a Taste of Koreatown has turned into a multicultural event showcasing a gamut of the best restaurants in Koreatown. It's part of the Korean American Coalition's efforts to promote the cultural richness of Koreatown, and it includes BCD Tofu House, a chain known for its spice tofu stew; Mexican restaurant El Cholo; Hamji Park and its Korean-style pork ribs; Palsaik Samgyupsal, purveyor of pork belly barbecue; Greek favorite Papa Cristos; Korean barbecue icon Park's BBQ; and Seoul Sausage Co. Saturday's festival will also feature a beer garden with Firestone craft beers, soju cocktails, Kooksoondang makali (unfiltered soju)
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FOOD
November 18, 2009
Flaming Clam Grill of Cheongdamdong LOCATION 3465 W. 6th St. (unit No. 20 across from Toebang restaurant), (213) 388-6800. PRICE Set meals, $39.99 to $99.99; a la carte items, $9 to $13. DETAILS Mondays to Saturdays 11 a.m. to 1 a.m., Sundays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. All major cards. Lot and street parking. Soju and beer.
FOOD
August 18, 2011 | Linda Burum
Scoring a table at 9 p.m. on a Friday at Wakasan is a little like winning the lottery's Hot Spot. The crowded Westwood pub, whose rustic furnishings give it the nostalgic feel of a family-run countryside tavern, is a haven for Japanese expats who love to while away the evening drinking with friends and nibbling on chef Hiro Wakasan's multicourse omakase. And those bottles on the table? Most aren't sake. "The drink of choice for about 80% of our Japanese customers is honkaku shochu," says owner Wakasan, referring to specialty and regional shochu, sought after for their subtly-layered flavors.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Formerly known as the Korean BBQ Cook-Off, a Taste of Koreatown has turned into a multicultural event showcasing a gamut of the best restaurants in Koreatown. It's part of the Korean American Coalition's efforts to promote the cultural richness of Koreatown, and it includes BCD Tofu House, a chain known for its spice tofu stew; Mexican restaurant El Cholo; Hamji Park and its Korean-style pork ribs; Palsaik Samgyupsal, purveyor of pork belly barbecue; Greek favorite Papa Cristos; Korean barbecue icon Park's BBQ; and Seoul Sausage Co. Saturday's festival will also feature a beer garden with Firestone craft beers, soju cocktails, Kooksoondang makali (unfiltered soju)
SPORTS
February 25, 1986
When you take away a doggie bag from some restaurants in Seoul, it means just that--there's dog in the bag. So reports Granville Watts of Reuters, advising readers what to expect if they plan to attend the 1988 Olympic Games in South Korea. Watts: "The South Korean government ruled last year that dog soup restaurants, called poshingtang , should be shut down to present a better image for foreigners, but the establishments still flourish." What kind of meals are served?
FOOD
August 18, 2011 | Linda Burum
Scoring a table at 9 p.m. on a Friday at Wakasan is a little like winning the lottery's Hot Spot. The crowded Westwood pub, whose rustic furnishings give it the nostalgic feel of a family-run countryside tavern, is a haven for Japanese expats who love to while away the evening drinking with friends and nibbling on chef Hiro Wakasan's multicourse omakase. And those bottles on the table? Most aren't sake. "The drink of choice for about 80% of our Japanese customers is honkaku shochu," says owner Wakasan, referring to specialty and regional shochu, sought after for their subtly-layered flavors.
NEWS
June 27, 2002 | CHRIS RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can get a mojito, a cosmo and even assorted martinis at Vine, a new fondue restaurant and nightspot in Hollywood. That wouldn't be unusual at most bars in town, but Vine has only a beer and wine permit. It's not breaking any laws, so what's in the cocktails? Soju, a Korean variation on vodka traditionally made from rice but more commonly from sweet potatoes these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2001 | HESEON PARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the MOCA ad campaign, billboard-size labels that describe the everyday as art, were to inlude the Palm Tree L.A., it would read: "Koreatown drinking rituals, 2001. Headset-wearing staff, big burly doorman, model-like waitresses, Korean twentysomething professionals, airport lounge decor, live house band, fake palm trees, karaoke rooms, strobe lights, tambourines, Asian music videos, pool tables, apple soju, Crown Royal whiskey, kimchi and bundegi."
BUSINESS
September 7, 2004 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Bloody Marys, screwdrivers and Bay Breezes are popular drinks at Mutt Lynch's in Newport Beach -- and that's a pretty good trick, considering that the place doesn't have a full liquor license. Mutt Lynch's, which is approved to sell only beer and wine, is one of hundreds of California restaurants that in the last year have taken advantage of what regulators concede is a loophole in the state's alcoholic beverage rules.
FOOD
July 14, 2011
Location: 3100 W. 8th St., No. 101, Los Angeles, (213) 383-8855 Prices: Entrees, $10.95 to $16.50; family-style fish plates, $13.50 to $17.50; bossam with oysters, $28.50. Details: Open 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 9:30 p.m. Monday to Saturday. Lot parking. Beer, soju, wine. Visa, MasterCard accepted
FOOD
November 18, 2009
Flaming Clam Grill of Cheongdamdong LOCATION 3465 W. 6th St. (unit No. 20 across from Toebang restaurant), (213) 388-6800. PRICE Set meals, $39.99 to $99.99; a la carte items, $9 to $13. DETAILS Mondays to Saturdays 11 a.m. to 1 a.m., Sundays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. All major cards. Lot and street parking. Soju and beer.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2004 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Bloody Marys, screwdrivers and Bay Breezes are popular drinks at Mutt Lynch's in Newport Beach -- and that's a pretty good trick, considering that the place doesn't have a full liquor license. Mutt Lynch's, which is approved to sell only beer and wine, is one of hundreds of California restaurants that in the last year have taken advantage of what regulators concede is a loophole in the state's alcoholic beverage rules.
NEWS
June 27, 2002 | CHRIS RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can get a mojito, a cosmo and even assorted martinis at Vine, a new fondue restaurant and nightspot in Hollywood. That wouldn't be unusual at most bars in town, but Vine has only a beer and wine permit. It's not breaking any laws, so what's in the cocktails? Soju, a Korean variation on vodka traditionally made from rice but more commonly from sweet potatoes these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2001 | HESEON PARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the MOCA ad campaign, billboard-size labels that describe the everyday as art, were to inlude the Palm Tree L.A., it would read: "Koreatown drinking rituals, 2001. Headset-wearing staff, big burly doorman, model-like waitresses, Korean twentysomething professionals, airport lounge decor, live house band, fake palm trees, karaoke rooms, strobe lights, tambourines, Asian music videos, pool tables, apple soju, Crown Royal whiskey, kimchi and bundegi."
SPORTS
February 25, 1986
When you take away a doggie bag from some restaurants in Seoul, it means just that--there's dog in the bag. So reports Granville Watts of Reuters, advising readers what to expect if they plan to attend the 1988 Olympic Games in South Korea. Watts: "The South Korean government ruled last year that dog soup restaurants, called poshingtang , should be shut down to present a better image for foreigners, but the establishments still flourish." What kind of meals are served?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011
HOT: Soju The romper for summer Daniel Radcliffe tribute cocktails Cramming into Rosewood Tavern NOT: Candy-flavored spirits The mini-dress for summer Mel Gibson and Lindsay Lohan tribute cocktails Cramming into the Dime matt.donnelly@latimes.com
MAGAZINE
August 6, 2006 | David Lansing, David Lansing writes about wine and spirits for The Times.
You know what gives you a hangover. But do you know why some spirits are worse than others? Congeners, that's why. Nasty things that drop in, like uninvited guests, during the distillation process. There are two truths about congeners: that more of them come along for the ride in darker spirits such as rum or whiskey (on the plus side, these impurities give some spirits their taste and smell), and that some can be filtered out through the distillation process.
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