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Sol Lewitt

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Sol LeWitt, an American artist whose modular sculptures and systematic murals rank among the most innovative works of the last 40 years, changing the direction of art internationally, died Sunday in New York City after a lengthy struggle with cancer. He was 78 and lived in Chester, Conn., a short distance from his birthplace in Hartford. In 1966, LeWitt made his first modular sculpture and first masterpiece.
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NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
When art critic Ken Johnson recently described Sol LeWitt's line drawings as something "anyone who has the instructions and access to wall space could reproduce," he could have been describing a recent LeWitt project in a Hollywood Hills kitchen.   Jack Latner's kitchen, part of our feature on the house last week, had a dynamic black and white LeWitt design that demonstrates how far a ruler, painter's tape and black paint can go toward...
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2001 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sol LeWitt stood in the middle of the Margo Leavin Gallery admiring his dazzling wall paintings. It was the first time he'd seen them, because the actual painting was done by a team of younger artists, a methodology LeWitt pioneered in the late 1960s. Looking at his geometric shapes, in pure Crayola tones of red, yellow and blue, green, orange and violet, he said, "I try to imagine the outcome, but I'm always surprised when I see them."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2011 | Jori Finkel
Few sculptures by Sol LeWitt actually resemble skyscrapers. But by installing 27 works by the artist in City Hall Park, in view of the lower Manhattan skyline, the Public Art Fund has put LeWitt's art into a playful and powerful dialogue with the city's architecture. Here, a pared sculpture of a white cube looks like some sort of building block or else the grid of a window. A pyramid form that might in a museum seem a celebration of art for art's sake seems more like an elegant real-estate solution.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
When art critic Ken Johnson recently described Sol LeWitt's line drawings as something "anyone who has the instructions and access to wall space could reproduce," he could have been describing a recent LeWitt project in a Hollywood Hills kitchen.   Jack Latner's kitchen, part of our feature on the house last week, had a dynamic black and white LeWitt design that demonstrates how far a ruler, painter's tape and black paint can go toward...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American Art, bowing to threats by curators to close a photography show after a key piece was removed on grounds it was pornographic, restored the disputed work Monday. The formal closure demand had been made earlier Monday by the Addison Gallery of American Art, at Philips Academy in Andover, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Tucked away in this sleepy town is a store that is carrying on a tradition begun in 15th-Century Italy. In a shop they call Ceramica, Carol LeWitt and Carol Huebner sell Italian majolica, brightly colored, ornately painted earthenware made in Deruta, Italy. LeWitt, 34, and Huebner, 41, own a second shop in New York City's Little Italy and plan to open another in West Hartford, Conn., to accommodate a rapidly expanding business that grew, appropriately, out of a need for a new dinner set.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Tucked away in this sleepy town is a store that is carrying on a tradition begun in 15th-Century Italy. In a shop they call Ceramica, Carol LeWitt and Carol Huebner sell Italian majolica, brightly colored, ornately painted earthenware made in Deruta, Italy. LeWitt, 34, and Huebner, 41, own a second shop in New York City's Little Italy and plan to open another in West Hartford, Conn., to accommodate a rapidly expanding business that grew, appropriately, out of a need for a new dinner set.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Winding through a studio filled with collections of curious objects — midcentury ceramics, vintage design magazines, Victorian-era photographs — Steve Roden pauses before a small, rather plain architectural drawing: his most prized possession, he says, by a man he considers "probably the largest influence on me of any artist," modernist architect Rudolf Schindler. It is a surprising statement from an artist who, though deeply indebted to modernism philosophically, would seem to share none of its fastidious aesthetic, nor architecture's tendency toward stable, monumental forms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2001 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Surprises--much less pleasant surprises--are not what you expect from Sol LeWitt. For more than 35 years, he has adhered to the Conceptual art mandate he himself laid out in 1967, to make work that is "mentally interesting" and "emotionally dry." Yet surprisingly, and pleasantly, LeWitt's insistently logical work has begun to assume an emotional charge. In tandem shows at Regen Projects and Margo Leavin Gallery, LeWitt defies the tone of austere order that he championed decades ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Winding through a studio filled with collections of curious objects — midcentury ceramics, vintage design magazines, Victorian-era photographs — Steve Roden pauses before a small, rather plain architectural drawing: his most prized possession, he says, by a man he considers "probably the largest influence on me of any artist," modernist architect Rudolf Schindler. It is a surprising statement from an artist who, though deeply indebted to modernism philosophically, would seem to share none of its fastidious aesthetic, nor architecture's tendency toward stable, monumental forms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Sol LeWitt, an American artist whose modular sculptures and systematic murals rank among the most innovative works of the last 40 years, changing the direction of art internationally, died Sunday in New York City after a lengthy struggle with cancer. He was 78 and lived in Chester, Conn., a short distance from his birthplace in Hartford. In 1966, LeWitt made his first modular sculpture and first masterpiece.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2001 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sol LeWitt stood in the middle of the Margo Leavin Gallery admiring his dazzling wall paintings. It was the first time he'd seen them, because the actual painting was done by a team of younger artists, a methodology LeWitt pioneered in the late 1960s. Looking at his geometric shapes, in pure Crayola tones of red, yellow and blue, green, orange and violet, he said, "I try to imagine the outcome, but I'm always surprised when I see them."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2001 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Surprises--much less pleasant surprises--are not what you expect from Sol LeWitt. For more than 35 years, he has adhered to the Conceptual art mandate he himself laid out in 1967, to make work that is "mentally interesting" and "emotionally dry." Yet surprisingly, and pleasantly, LeWitt's insistently logical work has begun to assume an emotional charge. In tandem shows at Regen Projects and Margo Leavin Gallery, LeWitt defies the tone of austere order that he championed decades ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American Art, bowing to threats by curators to close a photography show after a key piece was removed on grounds it was pornographic, restored the disputed work Monday. The formal closure demand had been made earlier Monday by the Addison Gallery of American Art, at Philips Academy in Andover, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Tucked away in this sleepy town is a store that is carrying on a tradition begun in 15th-Century Italy. In a shop they call Ceramica, Carol LeWitt and Carol Huebner sell Italian majolica, brightly colored, ornately painted earthenware made in Deruta, Italy. LeWitt, 34, and Huebner, 41, own a second shop in New York City's Little Italy and plan to open another in West Hartford, Conn., to accommodate a rapidly expanding business that grew, appropriately, out of a need for a new dinner set.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2011 | Jori Finkel
Few sculptures by Sol LeWitt actually resemble skyscrapers. But by installing 27 works by the artist in City Hall Park, in view of the lower Manhattan skyline, the Public Art Fund has put LeWitt's art into a playful and powerful dialogue with the city's architecture. Here, a pared sculpture of a white cube looks like some sort of building block or else the grid of a window. A pyramid form that might in a museum seem a celebration of art for art's sake seems more like an elegant real-estate solution.
NEWS
November 28, 1996
Konrad Fischer, 57, a gallery owner and important dealer in contemporary art. Fischer used his mother's maiden name, Lueg, in his early days as an artist, and attracted notice when he staged a "Demonstration for the Capitalist Realism" and other conceptual projects, with Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and Manfred Kuttner. In 1967, he opened a gallery with his wife, Dorothee, and his first exhibition introduced to Europe the American artist Carl Andres.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Tucked away in this sleepy town is a store that is carrying on a tradition begun in 15th-Century Italy. In a shop they call Ceramica, Carol LeWitt and Carol Huebner sell Italian majolica, brightly colored, ornately painted earthenware made in Deruta, Italy. LeWitt, 34, and Huebner, 41, own a second shop in New York City's Little Italy and plan to open another in West Hartford, Conn., to accommodate a rapidly expanding business that grew, appropriately, out of a need for a new dinner set.
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