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Sol Londe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1996
Robert Scheer's Column Left, "America's Heart Isn't With Its Children" (June 4), brought back many fond memories of Sol Londe, now 92 years of age and going strong. Londe influenced hundreds of junior high school students in the Los Angeles Unified School District as a volunteer in Project Dialogue, which I directed before retiring 10 years ago. As a young man in his 80s he never missed his weekly talk with seventh- and eighth-graders at Audubon Junior High. I remember how he involved students while describing the devastation one nuclear bomb could wreak by having them each graph the extent of impact it would have on the land and people beginning at its epicenter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Sol Londe, a pediatrician who helped establish a standard for normal blood pressure levels in children and pioneered research in childhood hypertension, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Reseda, according to his son, Dr. Stephen Londe. He was 100. Londe was also a founding member of Physicians for Social Responsibility and continued to attend peace rallies when he was in his 90s. "Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Sol Londe, a pediatrician who helped establish a standard for normal blood pressure levels in children and pioneered research in childhood hypertension, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Reseda, according to his son, Dr. Stephen Londe. He was 100. Londe was also a founding member of Physicians for Social Responsibility and continued to attend peace rallies when he was in his 90s. "Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2000
President Clinton said that low-income working families should temporarily receive additional food stamps to help them cope with "what can be a trying time" (Nov. 19). The Agriculture Department will allow states to allow three months of transitional food stamps for families going from welfare to work. If this is necessary at this late date of so-called welfare reform, how successful is the welfare-to-work program? Millions of poor adults work full-time or part-time. Millions more are just above the poverty line.
NEWS
May 17, 1993
H ere's Dr. Sol Londe's prescription for a long life: "Be interested in something outside of yourself." At 89, the Northridge pediatrician is living proof that the doctor is healing thyself. Londe, who made a name in blood-pressure research, still spends two mornings a week performing physicals on young offenders at Juvenile Hall.
OPINION
March 30, 1986
My congratulations to the members of Congress who stood up to all the Red-baiting and hypocritical flag-waving. SOL LONDE Bel Air
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992
I agree 100% with Jackson. With one out of four American children living in poverty, and about 10,000 children dying every year in poverty, some due to inadequate medical care and malnutrition, it will be wonderful to have a leading advocate for children like Hillary Clinton in the White House. SOL LONDE Northridge
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992
So the U.S. is guaranteeing $10 billion in Israeli loans to help the Israelis build housing for the immigrants to their country. Great! Now how about a few billion to guarantee housing for the millions of homeless and to promote family values by building affordable housing for young low-income and middle-class families right here in our own back yard? SOL LONDE Northridge
OPINION
June 7, 1987
According to an article in The Times (May 25), the United States is drifting aimlessly without a definite program for space exploration. Many scientists blame the top managers of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. I would suggest that the real cause is that the United States, in its insane drive toward military supremacy, is more interested in the militarization of space than it is in basic research. SOL LONDE Bel-Air
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996
Here we go again. This time it's a permanent cut in state taxes to business and banks of $230 million a year (June 29). I suppose this will be in addition to the benefits to corporations that are usually rushed through at the end of each legislative session. Gov. Pete Wilson gives us the phony excuse that it will help keep California more competitive. I say phony, because the economy is expanding despite the present tax rate. The irony is that some of these corporations run profitable factories in European countries where they pay much higher taxes than they do in the U.S. SOL LONDE Northridge
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999
In "A Shaken Alliance Reassesses Some of Its Objectives" (April 25), Tyler Marshall indicates that NATO has gotten itself into a mess in the Balkans and is looking to Russia as the key to a diplomatic solution. Why not a cease-fire until this is explored? SOL LONDE Northridge Thank you for your powerful picture and articles about families brutally driven from the pastoral Kosovo village of Belanica (April 25). It is painful to see the personal face of genocide. Yet I do want to know when villages are being destroyed, even though I am not sure what to do about it. There were no cameras to shock people of conscience in 1838 when American soldiers brutally tore Cherokee families from their farms and villages in the southeast and marched them through the winter snows to Oklahoma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999
Jon Forman (Commentary, Dec. 25) says it is unfair that he and Bill Gates pay exactly the same Social Security taxes. He also says it is unfair that other people, who pay less into Social Security than he, will derive a greater proportional benefit than he. He is, of course, correct on both counts. No one has ever claimed that the Social Security system treats everyone fairly. Since Forman is concerned with fairness in our society, one might ask if he is also concerned that CEOs of giant corporations reward themselves every year with mega-million-dollar bonuses, while the workers, who create this wealth through their labor, are taking home smaller and smaller pieces of the corporate pie. EARL CARTER Beverly Hills Forman brings up an important point: that the Social Security tax is a regressive tax, because low- and middle-income workers pay the tax on their whole income, while the wealthy pay on only a minuscule part of theirs.
OPINION
April 20, 1997
People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. It takes a lot of chutzpah for Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen to "blast" North Korea for expanding its army while its people starve (April 12). Cohen needs to be reminded that while the Pentagon is still spending at Cold War levels, millions of people are going hungry right here in his own backyard. Hunger afflicted almost 30 million Americans, 12 million of them children, according to The Times (Nov. 20, 1994). More recently, The Times reported that 37% of children in California were at risk of hunger (Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996
Here we go again. This time it's a permanent cut in state taxes to business and banks of $230 million a year (June 29). I suppose this will be in addition to the benefits to corporations that are usually rushed through at the end of each legislative session. Gov. Pete Wilson gives us the phony excuse that it will help keep California more competitive. I say phony, because the economy is expanding despite the present tax rate. The irony is that some of these corporations run profitable factories in European countries where they pay much higher taxes than they do in the U.S. SOL LONDE Northridge
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1996
Robert Scheer's Column Left, "America's Heart Isn't With Its Children" (June 4), brought back many fond memories of Sol Londe, now 92 years of age and going strong. Londe influenced hundreds of junior high school students in the Los Angeles Unified School District as a volunteer in Project Dialogue, which I directed before retiring 10 years ago. As a young man in his 80s he never missed his weekly talk with seventh- and eighth-graders at Audubon Junior High. I remember how he involved students while describing the devastation one nuclear bomb could wreak by having them each graph the extent of impact it would have on the land and people beginning at its epicenter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1993
In a complex world such as ours, it's easy to become "lost in the shuffle." For people under mental stress and hardship, the line between rationality and irrationality can be thin--the result, the tragic massacre in Oxnard (Dec. 3). Here, a man acted upon apparent personal frustration and disdain for "bureaucracy." All of us must be aware of the signs of mental illness and seek help and guidance from clergy, family, friends, support groups, etc. What happened in Oxnard was tragic, unnecessary and a result of an inability to cope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1993
How obscene! How immoral! How can our state legislators justify the tax breaks of hundreds of millions of dollars to corporations (Sept. 12), in the face of the state's revenue shortfall responsible for drastic cuts in medical and other services to the poor and the elderly? Do they still believe in the discredited trickle-down theory? I can only conclude that the alliance of Democrats and conservative Republicans that voted for this tax giveaway proves that we are governed by a big business one party system that does not serve the majority of the people.
OPINION
April 30, 1989
First, you accept the concept that the beneficiaries should foot the bill. This is the first time in our history that the cost of a program has not been spread over the whole population. Removing the cap on income taxable by the Medicare tax portion of the Social Security tax would be a more equitable approach. Second, it should be pointed out that the vast majority of the 40% of the seniors with enough income to pay income tax are most likely low-middle income people. The surtax, scheduled to rise to 28%, means a drastic cut in their living standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1993
How obscene! How immoral! How can our state legislators justify the tax breaks of hundreds of millions of dollars to corporations (Sept. 12), in the face of the state's revenue shortfall responsible for drastic cuts in medical and other services to the poor and the elderly? Do they still believe in the discredited trickle-down theory? I can only conclude that the alliance of Democrats and conservative Republicans that voted for this tax giveaway proves that we are governed by a big business one party system that does not serve the majority of the people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1993
In response to "Votes for Sale: How It's Done in Sacramento," by Michael Twombly, Column Left, June 10: Another political corruption column. While I honor The Times for its tenacity and constancy in presenting yet another "votes for sale" commentary, please be advised that I and many of my friends are in outrage burnout. What we need is not more shock but somewhere to go with our outrage. It is most disempowering when a commentary ends as this one does with a directionless call to action, "The selling of public policy must stop."
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