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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2010
'Wonders of the Solar System' Where: Science Channel When: 9 p.m. Wednesday Rating: TV-G (suitable for all ages)
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SCIENCE
March 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
In a first, scientists have detected rings encircling an M&M-shaped asteroid known as Chariklo. Until now, only the solar system's four gas planets - Jupiter, Neptune, Uranus and especially Saturn - were known to have rings. "It was an extremely surprising discovery," said James Bauer, a planetary astronomer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge who was not involved in the finding. "No one has ever seen rings around a comet or an asteroid before. This is a brand-new area.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California's Energy Commission approved plans for the state's first hybrid solar-power plant, helping clear the way for construction to begin this year. The 563-megawatt plant will be owned by the city of Victorville and will use a 250-acre array of solar collectors to augment the output of natural-gas-fueled turbine generators.
OPINION
March 26, 2014 | By Mark Butler
After nearly 38 years working for the National Park Service, I hung up my "flat hat" this month and retired as superintendent of Joshua Tree National Park. That means I can now speak out against pending proposals with the potential to harm our country's most spectacular national parks in the California desert. My experience in the National Park System began right out of high school, when I spent a season patrolling the mountainous trails of Yosemite National Park's backcountry as a wilderness ranger.
REAL ESTATE
September 15, 1985
Terence Green's Sept. 1 column was in keeping with what I had come to expect on subjects relating to energy--interesting, informational and in this case, personally encouraging. Since 1978, I have been directly and totally involved in solar design and installation in active systems, and peripherally, in passive solar systems. The solar battle is far from over even though it may be in a holding action at this time. I'll continue to look forward to your energy articles. PETER C. KOCHIS West Covina
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2012 | By Julie Cart
Sen. Barbara Boxer on Thursday urged Southern California Edison to expedite interconnection agreements with national parks and forests, where renewable energy projects have been sitting idle for years while federal agencies wrangle with the utility. In a letter to SCE President Ronald L. Litzinger, Boxer chastised the utility for delaying projects that were intended to reduce electric bills at national park and forest facilities. The letter was in response to a Times story this week that detailed a number of renewable projects caught in the impasse.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By Taylor Antrim
Solar A Novel Ian McEwan Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 294 pp., $26.95 In 2006, Ian McEwan survived a minor scrape with the plagiarism police. A British newspaper pointed out the resemblance between passages in his celebrated 2001 novel, "Atonement," and those of a 1977 memoir by the late romance writer Lucilla Andrews. McEwan serenely dismissed the matter in the Guardian two days later. He hadn't copied Andrews, merely referred to her book for hard facts about a 1940 London hospital, and he'd cited it in "Atonement's" acknowledgments.
WORLD
January 27, 2009
SCIENCE
July 10, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
When the moon blots out the sun's blinding rays on Sunday, a sliver of the Earth's surface will be plunged into eerie darkness. Travelers who have crossed thousands of miles to witness the celestial show will gaze at the sky and, for a few minutes, see a thing most people never get to see: a halo of fire — the sun's corona — flickering around the edges of the silhouette of the moon. But Jay Pasachoff, over on Easter Island, may be looking down more than up — calibrating his instruments, checking for technical glitches, peering through lenses.
REAL ESTATE
May 8, 2005
Regarding "Bipartisan Solar Plan Criticized" [May 1]: Pacific Gas & Electric supports the use of all forms of solar energy that are cost-effective and fit our resource needs. PG&E has long been supportive of renewable energy and supports Senate Bill 1 if amended to ensure that the costs paid by our customers are reasonable and not excessively burdensome. At present, the bill has no limit on the cost PG&E customers would pay to subsidize these solar incentive programs. Bruce Bowen San Francisco Bowen is acting director of environmental policy for PG&E.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Planet-hunters scouring the heavens have found thousands of distant worlds around other stars, but astronomers may have overlooked one lurking much closer to home. Scientists searching for glimmers of light beyond Pluto say they've discovered a new dwarf planet - and that its movements hint that an invisible giant planet far larger than Earth may inhabit the solar system's mysterious frontier. The new dwarf planet, dubbed 2012 VP113 and described in a study published in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature, helps confirm the existence of an "inner Oort cloud" in an interplanetary no man's land that was once thought to be barren but could be teeming with rocky objects.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Astronomers searching for the faintest glimmers of light beyond distant Pluto say they've discovered a new dwarf planet - and that this planetoid's movements hint that an invisible giant planet perhaps 10 times the size of Earth could be lurking around the dark fringes of our solar system. The new dwarf planet 2012 VP-113, described Wednesday in the journal Nature, helps confirm the existence of an “inner Oort cloud” in an interplanetary no man's land that was once thought to be empty but could potentially be teeming with rocky denizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Bob Pool
A monthlong mystery over who illuminated the big grin on Simi Valley's Happy Face Hill has been solved: Two sisters, ages 3 and 7, did it. "They wanted to surprise me because they knew how much I love the happy face," said their mother, Allison Robertson of Simi Valley. Robertson is a business administration student at Moorpark College who tries to do her studying on weekends. Her husband, Doug, takes Tabitha and Evelyn on Saturday jaunts to give her some peace when she hits the books.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2014 | By Amina Khan, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Phew! You may not have known it, but Earth barely missed the "perfect solar storm" that could have smashed into our magnetic field and wreaked havoc with our satellite systems, electronics and power systems, potentially causing trillions of dollars in damage, according to data from NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft. On July 22, 2012, STEREO-A spotted what looked like an enormous solar eruption sending out a coronal mass ejection at blazing top speeds of roughly 1,800 miles per second - the fastest ever recorded by the spacecraft.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power said Wednesday it is hiring more workers and simplifying applications for customers who install solar panels on their roof. The efforts come as the utility faces criticism from many Angelenos who complain of long waits and bureaucratic hurdles when trying to get solar systems hooked to the power grid. The utility has doubled its staff for processing applications, and will also hire more workers to man its hotline, the LADWP said in a Wednesday statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Steve Apostolof had a frown on his face as he drove past Happy Face Hill. The hillside features a 150-foot-wide smiley face that was created in 1998 by a man armed with a weed-whacker and a sprayer of herbicide. Since then, it has become something of a curiosity piece that welcomes motorists on the 118 Freeway to Simi Valley. But in the January dusk, Apostolof couldn't see Happy Face Hill, let alone its enormous grin. "With the sun setting early, the hill was pitch-black," Apostolof said of his trip home from work.
SCIENCE
September 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The solar wind -- a stream of charged particles ejected from the sun's upper atmosphere at 1 million mph -- is significantly weaker, cooler and less dense than it has been in 50 years, according to new data from the solar probe Ulysses. The cause seems to be a change in its magnetic flux, said Dave McComas of the Southwest Research Institute. Why it's happening is a mystery, but it has fluctuated like this in the past. Normally the sun goes through an 11-year cycle of more, then fewer, sunspots and a similar solar wind cycle.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. is planning to build three large solar power plants in the Mojave Desert. The three installations together will generate enough electricity for more than 375,000 homes. They'll be designed and built by BrightSource Energy Inc. of Oakland, with the first plant starting operation as early as 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Julie Cart
IVANPAH VALLEY, Calif. - The day begins early at the Ivanpah solar power plant. Long before the sun rises, computers aim five square miles of mirrors to reflect the first rays of dawn onto one of three 40-story towers rising above the desert floor. The 356,000 mirrors, each the size of a garage door, focus so much light on the towers that they pulsate with a blinding white light. At the top of each tower is an enormous boiler where the sun's energy heats water to more than 1,000 degrees, creating steam that spins electricity-generating turbines.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
Federal officials have announced the approval of two solar projects on public land in California and Nevada. The projects are expected to generate about 550 megawatts of renewable energy, or enough to power about 170,000 homes, the Interior Department said in a statement Wednesday. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the two projects are among 50 such utility-scale renewable proposals that have been approved by the department since 2009. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America The Stateline Solar Farm Project will be built in San Bernardino County about two miles south of the Nevada border.
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