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BUSINESS
May 4, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
In the spring of 2004 Raphael Domjan, a Swiss electrical engineer, conceived of a borderline insane idea -- to travel around the world aboard a ship powered entirely by solar energy. It would be an adventure and a statement. If he could do it, he would prove to the world that there are other alternatives to powering sea travel besides fossil fuels and wind. It would also demonstrate just what solar power is capable of. In 2008 he formed a partnership with German entrepreneur Immo Stroeher, who helped provide the funds to make this idea possible.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 1997 | JONATHAN WEBER
Solar power is one of those things that's always just around the corner. Just a few more technical advances over here, and a little government help over there, and we'll have solved all our energy and pollution problems once and for all. It seems like we've been hearing that for 30 years now. So, at the risk of ridicule, I'm here to tell you that widespread use of solar power is just around the corner. Rooftops across California will be turned into power plants by the hundreds of thousands.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | DAVID LePAGE, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to high-tech competitions for college students, the race may not be to the swiftest, but the richest. Three Southland campuses are gearing up for a solar-car shoot-out next year. None has a vehicle ready at this stage, but all have left the starting blocks in the dash for donors. Cal State Los Angeles even has a big gun concentrating on fund raising for the "Solar Eagle"--Raymond B. Landis, dean of the School of Engineering and Technology.
SPORTS
August 17, 1989 | DAVID LePAGE, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to high-tech competition for college students, the race may be not to the swiftest but the richest. Three Southland campuses are gearing up for a solar-car shoot-out next year. None have a vehicle ready at this stage, but all have left the starting blocks in the dash for donors. Cal State Los Angeles even has a big gun concentrating on fund-raising for the "Solar Eagle"--Raymond B. Landis, dean of the School of Engineering and Technology.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988
Solar Electric Engineering Inc. has signed an agreement to enter into a joint venture to manufacture and commercialize a new photovoltaic cell developed by scientists at International Solar Electric Technology. The company said the goal is to produce a cell that will allow the average homeowner to generate low-cost electricity from sunlight. Solar Electric, a 12-year-old California company, will jointly own the manufacturing plant with ISET.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Good morning, fellow sun-lovers. Here we are in Southern California, home of the New Year's Day Rose Parade, which customarily reminds the world at large that we loll around outdoors in winter without hats and coats. (Never mind the stormy weather of the last week.) But what the whole world doesn't know--and what many otherwise hip Californians aren't aware of--is that right here in Ventura County, El Sol is the basis of an important industry. And I'm not talking tourism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2002 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
This famously foggy city, home to cold, cloudy and often capricious weather, now wants to lighten its image to something decidedly sunlit: as the nation's leading municipal producer of solar power and renewable energy. On an unseasonably bright Thursday, Mayor Willie Brown unveiled what officials hope will be the first of several solar power refurbishment projects to make the city less reliant on aging fossil fuel-burning generators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
An experimental type of solar power cell has reached record efficiency levels, and one version continued to provide power at night, scientists reported last week. Although the experimental cells still are less efficient than photovoltaic cells, they may compete commercially in the future. The experimental cells use solids and a liquid solution to generate power, while existing commercial photovoltaic cells use only solids.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Applied Materials Inc. agreed to buy Applied Films Corp. for $464 million to add products used to build flat-panel displays and solar cells. Santa Clara, Calif.-based Applied Materials will pay $28.50 a share, 24% more than Applied Films' closing price Wednesday.
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