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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Summertime, and the long-range forecast is easy: more of the same. "This summer is not going to be a real exciting time, weather-wise, in Southern California," predicted meteorologist Wes Etheredge on Monday, the official first day of summer. Except for slightly lower than usual temperatures caused by the lingering effects of La Nina, the summer ahead should be a normal one, said Etheredge, who works for WeatherData, the company that provides weather information to The Times. So far, he's right.
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NEWS
April 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
Dangerously high winds delayed Tuesday's launch of space shuttle Discovery on a mission to study the thinning of the Earth's protective ozone layer. Discovery was supposed to lift off at 1:32 a.m. EDT, but NASA held the countdown at the nine-minute mark in hopes the strong crosswinds would subside at the shuttle emergency landing strip at the space center. Safety guidelines are stricter for nighttime launches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Discussion of the Ventura Pier, the city's most vulnerable landmark, veered into a new direction Thursday night as the public urged city officials to also consider the issue of width, rather than just length, when rebuilding. Until now, consultants, engineers and local pier supporters had all fixated on how to return the pier to its original 1,958-foot length. But city staff, speaking at a special public hearing held by the Community Affairs Commission, made it clear that a $2.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Explosions last week on the sun's surface were some of the most spectacular in recent years, but scientists say they expect their effect on Earth to be minimal. Radioactive particles from Friday's solar explosions have not reached Earth's atmosphere as expected, space scientist Kent A. Doggett said Saturday, downgrading earlier predictions of a "major" magnetic storm and disruptions to communications systems, as well as dazzling aurora displays in some northern states.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | DOUG MELLGREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A geomagnetic storm battering the Earth's poles is growing increasingly violent, and northern lights researchers call it the best thing that's ever happened to them. The storm, caused by the bombardment of energy from solar activity, is making the shimmering aurora borealis brighter, more colorful and more spectacular than usual this year.
SCIENCE
March 7, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The next sunspot cycle will be a year late and as much as 50% stronger than the last one, according to a forecast released Monday by scientists from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Such predictions are vital because the solar storms associated with the sunspots not only endanger humans in space, but can slow satellites in orbit, disrupt communications, interfere with Global Positioning Systems and bring down power grids.
SCIENCE
October 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Planetary scientists are breathing a sigh of relief as NASA's MAVEN mission to Mars has been cleared for takeoff. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission, slated for launch as early as Nov. 18, had been put on hold after this week's government shutdown, raising fears that the spacecraft would miss the launch window and be grounded for years. "I learned this morning that NASA has analyzed the MAVEN mission relative to the Anti-Deficiency Act and determined that it meets the requirements allowing an emergency exception," Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN's lead scientist based out of the University of Colorado in Boulder, said in an email.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2009 | Madeline Drexler
Iceland is famous for two kinds of night life. One is the manic weekend reveling in the capital, Reykjavik, where young folk stream from bar to bar in the narrow cobblestone streets, drinking, dancing and striking occasional sparks until daybreak.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
A heavy-duty solar flare erupted on the surface of the sun midmorning Thursday, and it appeared from early data that a solar storm from the X-class eruption was headed toward Earth. "It looks to be headed in the Earth's direction," Alex Young of Maryland's Goddard Space Flight Center told the Los Angeles Times in an interview Thursday. But, he noted, that's based on a view from just one of two spacecraft monitoring the sun.  The so-called coronal mass ejection -- a violently released bubble of gas and magnetic fields -- could veer off. Scientists are waiting on more data from spacecraft within the next few hours to pinpoint the speed and severity of the storm.  PHOTOS: Solar flare close-ups Mike Hapgood, a space weather scientist at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory near Oxford, England, explained coronal mass ejections in a recent interview with The Times: "Coronal mass ejections are caused when the magnetic field in the sun's atmosphere gets disrupted and then the plasma, the sun's hot ionized gas, erupts and send charged particles into space.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To avoid the dread of a 17 1/2-ton astronomy satellite tumbling at random out of the sky, NASA is considering sending it on a controlled suicide dive over the Pacific in March. The 9-year-old Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is still on a scientific par with the newly mended Hubble Space Telescope despite the failure of one of three gyroscopes in December. But NASA isn't sure whether the Compton Observatory can function in orbit if another gyroscope breaks.
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