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Solar Cycle

NEWS
April 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
Dangerously high winds delayed Tuesday's launch of space shuttle Discovery on a mission to study the thinning of the Earth's protective ozone layer. Discovery was supposed to lift off at 1:32 a.m. EDT, but NASA held the countdown at the nine-minute mark in hopes the strong crosswinds would subside at the shuttle emergency landing strip at the space center. Safety guidelines are stricter for nighttime launches.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Discussion of the Ventura Pier, the city's most vulnerable landmark, veered into a new direction Thursday night as the public urged city officials to also consider the issue of width, rather than just length, when rebuilding. Until now, consultants, engineers and local pier supporters had all fixated on how to return the pier to its original 1,958-foot length. But city staff, speaking at a special public hearing held by the Community Affairs Commission, made it clear that a $2.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Explosions last week on the sun's surface were some of the most spectacular in recent years, but scientists say they expect their effect on Earth to be minimal. Radioactive particles from Friday's solar explosions have not reached Earth's atmosphere as expected, space scientist Kent A. Doggett said Saturday, downgrading earlier predictions of a "major" magnetic storm and disruptions to communications systems, as well as dazzling aurora displays in some northern states.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | DOUG MELLGREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A geomagnetic storm battering the Earth's poles is growing increasingly violent, and northern lights researchers call it the best thing that's ever happened to them. The storm, caused by the bombardment of energy from solar activity, is making the shimmering aurora borealis brighter, more colorful and more spectacular than usual this year.
SCIENCE
March 7, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The next sunspot cycle will be a year late and as much as 50% stronger than the last one, according to a forecast released Monday by scientists from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Such predictions are vital because the solar storms associated with the sunspots not only endanger humans in space, but can slow satellites in orbit, disrupt communications, interfere with Global Positioning Systems and bring down power grids.
SCIENCE
September 1, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
For nearly half a century, the Mt. Wilson Observatory was not only the center of the universe for the study of space science, it taught us just how huge that universe was. At the eyepiece of the observatory's then ground-breaking 100-inch Hooker telescope astronomer Edwin Hubble made two of the most shocking scientific discoveries of the 20th century: The universe was far larger than anyone imagined and it was expanding. Those discoveries knocked man from his cherished place at the seat of creation to the status of a middling creature scuttling across the surface of an obscure planet among trillions of stars.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Four billion years ago, rivers and lakes dotted the surface of Mars, their waters reflecting puffy clouds drifting in a blue sky, scientists believe. Now, it's a dry, rusty rock that's subject to fierce sandstorms, withering blasts of radiation and freezing temperatures that have frozen carbon dioxide to the planet's poles. What happened? That's the question NASA seeks to answer with the scheduled launch Monday of the MAVEN spacecraft. Planetary scientists believe the answer lies high in the Martian atmosphere.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
A heavy-duty solar flare erupted on the surface of the sun midmorning Thursday, and it appeared from early data that a solar storm from the X-class eruption was headed toward Earth. "It looks to be headed in the Earth's direction," Alex Young of Maryland's Goddard Space Flight Center told the Los Angeles Times in an interview Thursday. But, he noted, that's based on a view from just one of two spacecraft monitoring the sun.  The so-called coronal mass ejection -- a violently released bubble of gas and magnetic fields -- could veer off. Scientists are waiting on more data from spacecraft within the next few hours to pinpoint the speed and severity of the storm.  PHOTOS: Solar flare close-ups Mike Hapgood, a space weather scientist at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory near Oxford, England, explained coronal mass ejections in a recent interview with The Times: "Coronal mass ejections are caused when the magnetic field in the sun's atmosphere gets disrupted and then the plasma, the sun's hot ionized gas, erupts and send charged particles into space.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2009 | Madeline Drexler
Iceland is famous for two kinds of night life. One is the manic weekend reveling in the capital, Reykjavik, where young folk stream from bar to bar in the narrow cobblestone streets, drinking, dancing and striking occasional sparks until daybreak.
OPINION
October 4, 2012 | By Glen M. MacDonald
It was a long hot summer. The United States experienced the warmest July in its history, with more than 3,000 heat records broken across the country. Overall, the summer was the nation's third warmest on record and comes in a year that is turning out to be the hottest ever. High temperatures along with low precipitation generated drought conditions across 60% of the Lower 48 states, which affected 70% of the corn and soybean crop and rendered part of the Mississippi River nonnavigable.
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