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SCIENCE
November 2, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
There's a solar eclipse coming Sunday morning, and you can watch it live, right here. Beginning at 3:45 a.m. PST, the online observatory Slooh.com will stream the solar eclipse live from a remote part of the Kenyan countryside. The broadcast will last for 3 1/2 hours, ending at 7:15 a.m. and will also include live feeds from telescopes in Gabon, Africa, and the Canary Islands. You'll find it playing in the video box above. Why do you need to watch the total eclipse online? Because unless you live along a very narrow band of land on the African continent, it won't be visible from where you live.
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SCIENCE
November 2, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
There's a solar eclipse coming Sunday morning, and you can watch it live, right here. Beginning at 3:45 a.m. PST, the online observatory Slooh.com will stream the solar eclipse live from a remote part of the Kenyan countryside. The broadcast will last for 3 1/2 hours, ending at 7:15 a.m. and will also include live feeds from telescopes in Gabon, Africa, and the Canary Islands. You'll find it playing in the video box above. Why do you need to watch the total eclipse online? Because unless you live along a very narrow band of land on the African continent, it won't be visible from where you live.
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SCIENCE
October 16, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
On Nov. 3, the moon will once again pass between the Earth and the sun, partially blocking out our life-giving star and putting on a spectacular celestial show for people who are in the right place to see it. And this year, the best place to see the eclipse is in Africa. "In this very narrow path across Africa there will be a total eclipse, when the moon covers the sun completely, darkness descends and the stars come out," said Mike Simmons, founder and president of a group called Astronomers Without Borders.
SCIENCE
November 1, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
There's a rare hybrid solar eclipse coming on Sunday, and no matter where you are in the world, you will be able to see it - thanks to the Internet. If you live on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, in parts of southern Europe or anywhere in Africa, then you can enjoy this eclipse firsthand with a little planning and the proper viewing glasses , of course. If you live in Los Angeles or somewhere that is not any of the places mentioned above, then you will have to turn to your computer if you want to watch the eclipse live.  Luckily, Paul Cox, an astronomer at the online observatory Slooh.com, is shepherding a telescope and other equipment to a remote spot in Kenya, where he plans to live-stream the total eclipse to viewers across the world.
NEWS
May 11, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Calder of Pasadena saw it straight overhead. David Corrick of Los Feliz found it by looking north. Lisa Ventura of Tujunga discovered it by looking west. James Strogen glimpsed it in Hollywood while gazing east. Howie Ngoy faced south to see it in San Gabriel. People were looking out for themselves Tuesday as the last solar eclipse of the century was totally eclipsed over most of Los Angeles. Instead of the moon blotting out the sun, clouds did it.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | Alice Kahn
TO: The Boss FROM: Your Lowly Scribe I am writing today to request assignment to cover the total solar eclipse on July 11, 1991. Unfortunately, the eclipse is expected to be seen best from the Hawaiian island of Maui. Much as I hate to ruin my summer vacation plans by flying off to Maui (we did have reservations for Detroit), I feel it is important to get the best possible view of the eclipse. While they tell me Motown is lovely in July, I have a job to do. I am writing now, a full two years in advance, to indicate my commitment to this project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1991 | NONA YATES
More than 100,000 spectators are expected to descend upon the prime viewing areas in Hawaii and Baja California to watch as the moon's shadow races across the world Thursday. Most hotels in Hawaii have been booked for more than a year and officials are expected to close the highway leading to the southern tip of Baja. So many people are expected to try to drive down the peninsula to see the eclipse that Mexican authorities are expected to turn away anyone without proof of accommodations.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As celestial events go, it was no Star of Bethlehem. But sky watchers in much of North America were treated Monday to a rarity: a partial solar eclipse on Christmas Day. People in the Northeast saw the moon blot out as much as 60% of the sun around midday. The solar disc looked like a yellow crescent. Viewing was best in New England and the upper Midwest, while clouds got in the way across much of the nation's midsection. How unusual is a Christmas solar eclipse?
WORLD
January 27, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
The Ventura County Astronomical Society will host a public viewing of a partial solar eclipse June 10 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at Grant Park. The group will meet near the Father Sierra Cross in the park, located off Poli Street overlooking downtown. Weather permitting, viewers should have an excellent opportunity to view the 77% solar eclipse, astronomical society officials said. For details, call 520-9666.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
On Nov. 3, the moon will once again pass between the Earth and the sun, partially blocking out our life-giving star and putting on a spectacular celestial show for people who are in the right place to see it. And this year, the best place to see the eclipse is in Africa. "In this very narrow path across Africa there will be a total eclipse, when the moon covers the sun completely, darkness descends and the stars come out," said Mike Simmons, founder and president of a group called Astronomers Without Borders.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The remote Faroe Islands, midway between Scotland and Iceland, will be within the "path of totality" for a total solar eclipse on March 20, 2015. Eclipse-chasers who visit this small group of islands that just 50,000 people call home can expect to see 2 minutes, 9 seconds of totality on that day, if viewing conditions are good. That's the word from Chicago-based Great Canadian Travel Co. , which offers an 11-day eclipse trip that begins and ends in Iceland . Participants fly from Iceland to the islands to see Torshavn , the capital, and the islands' rugged side places such as Roykstovan, Gjogv, Eidi and other villages.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Solar eclipse lovers--set your alarms for Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. PST. A total solar eclipse is coming, and although it is unlikely you'll be able to see it in person, you can watch it live on your computer or smartphone--as long as you remember to look. The eclipse will begin late Tuesday morning California time. The "path of totality," or the part of the earth from where the eclipse can be seen, is 108 miles wide and will cover 9,000 miles over a three-hour period. But it will be almost entirely over the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The annual solar eclipse in the West on Sunday might be considered a stage-setter for a another solar eclipse coming in the fall - and a reason to travel to Australia. Brownell Travel based in Birmingham, Ala., offers an 11-night trip that features the Nov. 14 total eclipse that will only be seen Down Under. The path of totality of the eclipse, which begins at dawn, is in the northern edge of the country. On the trip, participants will be near Cairns on a cruise to view the early-morning eclipse and later tour the Great Barrier Reef and Daintree Rainforest on the northeast coast of Queensland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The newspapers and websites were full Monday morning with stories about Sunday's eclipse: finely done accounts with facts, figures, quotations and on-the-scene reporting. Will any win the Pulitzer Prize? Only time will tell. But if so, there is precedent: The 1924 Pulitzer Prize for reporting went to Magner White, a reporter for the San Diego Sun, for his account of a noontime solar eclipse that occurred Sept. 10, 1923. White's account, in the lean, vivid prose of the day, had weird gusts of wind hitting the city, circus animals pacing and roaring, prostitutes falling to their knees and vowing to change their wicked ways, and San Diego residents exchanging "ghastly smiles, pale lilies they are. " The Sun's story was on the stands within minutes of the eclipse becoming total.
SPORTS
May 20, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Placing surreal moment atop surreal moment - on Sunday at Staples, they were piling up like pancakes - the sun starts to vanish about 5:30 p.m. at L.A. Live. What they call an annular solar eclipse has begun, a cockeyed celestial event that looks as if it were penciled out by Picasso. First thought: They've assigned me to cover the Apocalypse. Second thought: Wow, the 110 is really gonna be a mess. Sunday was just another Sunday here in the City of Playoffs, except that you had this cosmic convergence of a major bike race, a hockey playoff game, a basketball playoff game and a playoff eclipse, all within hours of each other at L.A. Live, the softest spot in our city's stuccoed soul.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | from United Press International
Residents of Oregon and Alaska could have the best views of a partial solar eclipse that will occur Tuesday morning. At the height of the eclipse, perhaps 80% of the sun's light will be blocked as the moon's shadow falls on Alaska, astronomers said. They said the best vantage points in the lower 48 states should be around Seattle and Eugene, Ore., where about half the sun will be hidden from view shortly after 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994 | NONA YATES
A partial eclipse of the sun will be visible in the Southland next Tuesday morning. It will be the last solar eclipse visible from Los Angeles until 2000. As seen from Los Angeles, about four-fifths of the sun will be eclipsed by the moon at 9 a.m. The sun will look like a brilliant crescent in the morning sky, which will darken noticeably. The eclipse, which will be seen in other parts of the country as an annular, or "ring of fire" eclipse, will begin here at 7:44 a.m. and end at 10:29 a.m.
SCIENCE
May 19, 2012 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
A rare "ring" solar eclipse is coming to California on Sunday evening - the first of its kind to be visible from the continental United States since 1994. From our vantage point in Southern California, the moon will block about 85% of the sun's diameter, leaving behind a crescent-shaped sliver. But those farther north will see the moon nudge its way into the center of the sun, leaving a ring of fire visible around the moon's edge. Scientists call this an annular eclipse. ("Annulus" means "ring" in Latin.)
NATIONAL
May 19, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Solar eclipse excitement is building, but one astronomer is trying to warn the masses: Don't look up into the sky with the naked eye during Sunday's solar eclipse. To do so is to risk serious eye injury and even blindness, he said. "Looking up into the [solar eclipse] without the proper protection is just dangerous," said astronomer Stephen Edberg at NASA's  Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "You need proper eye protection. " Beginning late Sunday afternoon, a large swath of the western United States will be positioned to see the solar eclipse and the so-called "ring of fire" created as the moon passes in front of the sun but doesn't quite obscure it. The result will be a dramatic image as the sun's rays shoot from behind.
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