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BUSINESS
November 12, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Solar eclipse lovers--set your alarms for Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. PST. A total solar eclipse is coming, and although it is unlikely you'll be able to see it in person, you can watch it live on your computer or smartphone--as long as you remember to look. The eclipse will begin late Tuesday morning California time. The "path of totality," or the part of the earth from where the eclipse can be seen, is 108 miles wide and will cover 9,000 miles over a three-hour period. But it will be almost entirely over the Pacific Ocean.
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SCIENCE
November 2, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
There's a solar eclipse coming Sunday morning, and you can watch it live, right here. Beginning at 3:45 a.m. PST, the online observatory Slooh.com will stream the solar eclipse live from a remote part of the Kenyan countryside. The broadcast will last for 3 1/2 hours, ending at 7:15 a.m. and will also include live feeds from telescopes in Gabon, Africa, and the Canary Islands. You'll find it playing in the video box above. Why do you need to watch the total eclipse online? Because unless you live along a very narrow band of land on the African continent, it won't be visible from where you live.
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NEWS
December 26, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As celestial events go, it was no Star of Bethlehem. But sky watchers in much of North America were treated Monday to a rarity: a partial solar eclipse on Christmas Day. People in the Northeast saw the moon blot out as much as 60% of the sun around midday. The solar disc looked like a yellow crescent. Viewing was best in New England and the upper Midwest, while clouds got in the way across much of the nation's midsection. How unusual is a Christmas solar eclipse?
SCIENCE
November 1, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
There's a rare hybrid solar eclipse coming on Sunday, and no matter where you are in the world, you will be able to see it - thanks to the Internet. If you live on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, in parts of southern Europe or anywhere in Africa, then you can enjoy this eclipse firsthand with a little planning and the proper viewing glasses , of course. If you live in Los Angeles or somewhere that is not any of the places mentioned above, then you will have to turn to your computer if you want to watch the eclipse live.  Luckily, Paul Cox, an astronomer at the online observatory Slooh.com, is shepherding a telescope and other equipment to a remote spot in Kenya, where he plans to live-stream the total eclipse to viewers across the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994 | NONA YATES
A partial eclipse of the sun will be visible in the Southland next Tuesday morning. It will be the last solar eclipse visible from Los Angeles until 2000. As seen from Los Angeles, about four-fifths of the sun will be eclipsed by the moon at 9 a.m. The sun will look like a brilliant crescent in the morning sky, which will darken noticeably. The eclipse, which will be seen in other parts of the country as an annular, or "ring of fire" eclipse, will begin here at 7:44 a.m. and end at 10:29 a.m.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | from United Press International
Residents of Oregon and Alaska could have the best views of a partial solar eclipse that will occur Tuesday morning. At the height of the eclipse, perhaps 80% of the sun's light will be blocked as the moon's shadow falls on Alaska, astronomers said. They said the best vantage points in the lower 48 states should be around Seattle and Eugene, Ore., where about half the sun will be hidden from view shortly after 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
At the height of the morning rush hour Tuesday, the shadow of the moon will race across Los Angeles in the last solar eclipse visible here for the rest of the century. Almost everyone in North America will have a chance to watch the moon partially eclipse the sun.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Casting darkness across Europe in the very heart of day, the last total solar eclipse of the millennium on Wednesday brought with it wonder and hokum, celebrations and a humbling reminder that humanity is a small cog in the mechanics of existence. Sweeping across Earth's face at more than 1,700 mph, the 60-mile-wide shadow projected as the moon moved in front of the sun produced false and fleeting night along a path from Nova Scotia to the Bay of Bengal off eastern India.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
Sky watchers from the South Pacific to the Americas will witness the first solar eclipse of 2005 today when the moon blots out part of the sun. It will be a partial eclipse rather than a total one, in which the Earth is cast into darkness. But it is expected to be the last partial solar eclipse visible from the continental United States until May 20, 2012. The broadest view of the eclipse will be available in Miami, where nearly half of the sun will be covered at 6:20 p.m. EDT.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1991 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From telescope shops in Tokyo to barrooms in Baja, the most watched eclipse in recent history is casting its spell over astro-entrepreneurs--including plenty who couldn't tell a supernova from a Camaro. Because the eclipse will pass Thursday over heavily touristed spots such as Hawaii and the beaches of Mexico, it's creating the biggest outer-space marketing bonanza since Halley's comet.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
On Nov. 3, the moon will once again pass between the Earth and the sun, partially blocking out our life-giving star and putting on a spectacular celestial show for people who are in the right place to see it. And this year, the best place to see the eclipse is in Africa. "In this very narrow path across Africa there will be a total eclipse, when the moon covers the sun completely, darkness descends and the stars come out," said Mike Simmons, founder and president of a group called Astronomers Without Borders.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The remote Faroe Islands, midway between Scotland and Iceland, will be within the "path of totality" for a total solar eclipse on March 20, 2015. Eclipse-chasers who visit this small group of islands that just 50,000 people call home can expect to see 2 minutes, 9 seconds of totality on that day, if viewing conditions are good. That's the word from Chicago-based Great Canadian Travel Co. , which offers an 11-day eclipse trip that begins and ends in Iceland . Participants fly from Iceland to the islands to see Torshavn , the capital, and the islands' rugged side places such as Roykstovan, Gjogv, Eidi and other villages.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Solar eclipse lovers--set your alarms for Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. PST. A total solar eclipse is coming, and although it is unlikely you'll be able to see it in person, you can watch it live on your computer or smartphone--as long as you remember to look. The eclipse will begin late Tuesday morning California time. The "path of totality," or the part of the earth from where the eclipse can be seen, is 108 miles wide and will cover 9,000 miles over a three-hour period. But it will be almost entirely over the Pacific Ocean.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2012 | By Eryn Brown and Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
As a scientist working in the cutting-edge field of exoplanets, Jean-Michel Désert usually trains his eye at far-off reaches of the Milky Way, searching for planets circling super-distant stars. But on Tuesday afternoon, the Harvard University researcher will take part in a nearly 400-year-old astronomical obsession - tracking a familiar neighbor, Venus, as its orbit carries it directly between Earth and the sun. This rare event, known as a transit of Venus, takes place only once every century or so, usually in pairs spaced eight years apart.
SPORTS
May 22, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
The Dodgers are living in slop and there's no end in sight. Nothing seems to faze them. Injuries, ownership change, a modest lineup, youngish bullpen, rebuilt rotation, solar eclipses. Doesn't matter. They just keep winning. Keep finding the bizarro way of the day to win. Ways that don't always make sense. Yet, as it continues to happen with regularity, you have to seriously consider that something special is going on. Individually, they have maybe three outstanding players.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The annual solar eclipse in the West on Sunday might be considered a stage-setter for a another solar eclipse coming in the fall - and a reason to travel to Australia. Brownell Travel based in Birmingham, Ala., offers an 11-night trip that features the Nov. 14 total eclipse that will only be seen Down Under. The path of totality of the eclipse, which begins at dawn, is in the northern edge of the country. On the trip, participants will be near Cairns on a cruise to view the early-morning eclipse and later tour the Great Barrier Reef and Daintree Rainforest on the northeast coast of Queensland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
At the height of the morning rush hour Tuesday,the shadow of the moon will race across Orange County in the last solar eclipse to be visible to county residents for the rest of the century. Almost everyone in North America will have a chance to watch the moon partially eclipse the sun.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Southern California should have an extraordinary sunset Saturday because the moon will pass directly in front of the sun just as old Sol drops over the horizon. This will be the second solar eclipse in this region in six months, but it will be quite different from the partial eclipse seen here July 11, which was a total eclipse over Hawaii and Baja California. The moon will not quite cover the sun, leaving a thin ring of light around the sun in what is called an annular eclipse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The newspapers and websites were full Monday morning with stories about Sunday's eclipse: finely done accounts with facts, figures, quotations and on-the-scene reporting. Will any win the Pulitzer Prize? Only time will tell. But if so, there is precedent: The 1924 Pulitzer Prize for reporting went to Magner White, a reporter for the San Diego Sun, for his account of a noontime solar eclipse that occurred Sept. 10, 1923. White's account, in the lean, vivid prose of the day, had weird gusts of wind hitting the city, circus animals pacing and roaring, prostitutes falling to their knees and vowing to change their wicked ways, and San Diego residents exchanging "ghastly smiles, pale lilies they are. " The Sun's story was on the stands within minutes of the eclipse becoming total.
SPORTS
May 20, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Placing surreal moment atop surreal moment - on Sunday at Staples, they were piling up like pancakes - the sun starts to vanish about 5:30 p.m. at L.A. Live. What they call an annular solar eclipse has begun, a cockeyed celestial event that looks as if it were penciled out by Picasso. First thought: They've assigned me to cover the Apocalypse. Second thought: Wow, the 110 is really gonna be a mess. Sunday was just another Sunday here in the City of Playoffs, except that you had this cosmic convergence of a major bike race, a hockey playoff game, a basketball playoff game and a playoff eclipse, all within hours of each other at L.A. Live, the softest spot in our city's stuccoed soul.
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