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BUSINESS
June 8, 1997
It appears that The Times intends to do for the solar energy business what it is doing for the electric auto business: trumpet the overblown promises of heavily subsidized, politically correct but, realistically, doomed industries. "A Fresh Jolt" (Heard on the Beat, May 28) parrots the ridiculous claim that 40 megawatts of solar power will light 1,000 homes. Well those 40 megawatts are available only a few minutes a day. The average is much less--none at night and very little on cloudy days.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Shan Li and Stuart Pfeifer
Solar installer SolarCity Corp. has figured out a way to tap retail investors willing to earn green by going green. The San Mateo company on Wednesday said it plans to offer a way to buy investment products similar to bonds. Instead of being backed by SolarCity, these securities would offer returns backed by solar projects and contracts the company has with customers who have panels installed on their roof. This is just one in a number of novel ways that solar power companies, many just start-ups, are finding ways to finance their businesses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014
Join Times staff writer Julie Cart for an online discussion at 9 a.m. Monday about the dimming prospects of solar energy. The Obama administration set off a building boom of large-scale solar power plants across the Southwest about five years ago, but the pace of development has slowed to a crawl. A number of companies have gone out of business and projects have been canceled. The first auction of public land for solar developers, an event once highly anticipated by federal planners, failed to draw a single bid last fall.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
California solar panel installer SolarCity is turning to small investors to raise cash to expand its network of rooftop solar systems. The company, which installs solar panels on homes and businesses and government buildings, will allow individual investors and institutions to invest in solar panels that can generate income for years to come. Solar City Chief Executive Lyndon Rive told the Associated Press that the company would sell securities directly to individuals. These securities could be held for varying lengths of time, or even traded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2009 | William Nottingham
Should the city of Los Angeles become a national leader in the generation of renewable solar energy, as a March 3 ballot measure proposes? Or would it be too costly to put 400 megawatts' worth of photovoltaic cells on roofs and parking lots across town? Times editors recently asked the 10 mayoral candidates about the solar energy charter amendment, Measure B. Here are excerpts of their responses. Do you support Measure B, the city's proposed solar power initiative? Why?
BUSINESS
July 2, 2009 | Ronald D. White
The huge car carrier ship called the M/V Auriga Leader idled at the Port of Long Beach, burning through enough electricity to power 100 homes as workers loaded and unloaded a fleet of Toyotas. But unlike any of the diesel-spewing, power-draining vessels that travel here, the Auriga Leader sports 328 solar panels on its top deck -- a small array that provides 10% of the energy used by the giant ship while she is docked.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | Marla Dickerson
Green energy may be losing momentum inside the Beltway. But officials in the heart of Silicon Valley are betting on the sun. This week, the Palo Alto City Council approved a plan to buy clean power from local utility customers who install solar panels on their roofs. That's right. The power company will pay them, not the other way around. The arrangement - known by the clunky name “feed-in tariff” - is still a rarity in the United States. But Palo Alto officials want to help pioneer the effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2009 | David Zahniser
The campaign for a new solar energy ballot measure in Los Angeles has raised more than $267,000, nearly two-thirds of it from groups affiliated with the union that represents Department of Water and Power employees, according to a report released Wednesday. International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 18 provided $50,000 for the campaign supporting Measure B, a proposal on the March 3 ballot to add 400 megawatts of solar panels throughout Los Angeles by 2014.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | CHRISTINA LIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after darkness falls, a cool green glow can be seen in the hills above this Ventura County town. The light is visible for miles along California 126. Theories of its origin have run the gamut from UFO landing site to experimental oil rig. In fact, it's an illuminated sculpture, the brainchild of artist Steven A. Simon. Simon wanted to make sure his 30-foot-tall, 18-inch-wide sculpture was noticed when he set it up three months ago. Mission accomplished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014
Join Times staff writer Julie Cart for an online discussion at 9 a.m. Monday about the dimming prospects of solar energy. The Obama administration set off a building boom of large-scale solar power plants across the Southwest about five years ago, but the pace of development has slowed to a crawl. A number of companies have gone out of business and projects have been canceled. The first auction of public land for solar developers, an event once highly anticipated by federal planners, failed to draw a single bid last fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | Julie Cart
Five years after the Obama administration's renewable energy initiative touched off a building boom of large-scale solar power plants across the desert Southwest, the pace of development has slowed to a crawl, with a number of companies going out of business and major projects canceled for lack of financing. Of the 365 federal solar applications since 2009, just 20 plants are on track to be built. Only three large-scale solar facilities have gone online, two in California and one in Nevada.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California ranks sixth among the top 12 states in per-capita installations of solar electric energy generators, according to a just-released report by an advocacy group. "Lighting the Way," the study by the Environment America Research and Policy Center, names California as a leader among the 50 states, along with Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina and Vermont. "The sky's the limit on solar energy," said Michelle Kinman, clean energy advocate for Environment California, one of the group's 29 state affiliates.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Catherine Green
California had a banner year in solar installations in 2012, bringing the state 391 megawatts closer to its goal to install 3,000 megawatts by 2017. According to a California Solar Initiative progress report by the Public Utilities Commission, those additions represent a 26% growth from 2011. The state is now equipped to produce 1,629 megawatts of solar energy across completed projects at nearly 168,000 sites -- enough to power 150,000 homes. Evan Gillespie, a deputy director with the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign, said the progress was significant.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2013
Re "Sci-fi worthy of Malthus," Opinion, April 30 So, does "human imagination" to find new sources of energy apply only to fossil fuels? Doesn't it also extend to the ingenuity needed to develop clean, sustainable energy from the sun and other alternative sources? Maybe before Jonah Goldberg promotes fracking and asteroid mining (did I read that correctly?), he might first consider supporting solar energy. That's not pessimism because we think we are depleting our source of energy (fossil fuels)
NATIONAL
January 30, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
Hawaii's love affair with rooftop solar energy has turned into a gold rush. In 2012, as many permits for new solar units were issued on the island of Oahu alone as in the entire state over the last decade. That, inevitably, has led to gridlock. Homeowners and businesses in some areas have been required to conduct expensive studies before hooking up new solar power to the electrical grid, which utility operators fear could become saturated with unpredictable do-it-yourself power.
OPINION
January 18, 2013
Re "DWP will buy excess solar energy," Jan. 12 Well it's about time. But why should the L.A. Department of Water and Power limit the amount of solar energy it will buy from customers through 2016 to 100 megawatts? Why not buy all the solar power available? Why can't residential customers sell all the power they generate? Residential customers' meters should simply run backward when they generate more power than they are using, essentially selling it back at the same rate they pay. We would end up with a broad-based system less reliant on large, centralized facilities with all the large liabilities (think San Onofre)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2013 | Catherine Saillant
Los Angeles Department of Water and Power customers for the first time will be able to sell back excess solar energy created on rooftops and parking lots under a new program approved Friday by the city utility's board of commissioners. Described as the largest urban rooftop solar program of its kind in the nation, the so-called feed-in-tariff program would pay customers 17 cents per kilowatt hour for energy produced on their own equipment. The DWP has already accepted more than a dozen applicants and will be taking dozens more as it accepts contracts for up to 100 megawatts of solar power through 2016.
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