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OPINION
January 17, 2014
Re “Solar power's outlook not as sunny,” Jan. 12 The article shows that the desert may not be the best place after all to generate solar power. As The Times points out, the move is away from large, industrial-scale desert plants and toward urban-based, mid-sized ones and rooftop solar: so-called distributed generation. Urban solar built over parking lots and on rooftops eliminates the environmental damage of desert solar - along with the need for environment impact statements, new transmission lines to bring the power to the cities and the costly lawsuits brought against desert plants.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By David Horsey
The Koch brothers have a new ploy to protect the traditional energy business that helped make them the planet's fifth- and sixth-richest humans. They are funding a campaign to shackle solar energy consumers who have escaped the grip of big electric utilities. Of all the pro-business, anti-government causes they have funded with their billions, this may be the most cynical and self-serving. On Sunday, a Los Angeles Times story by Evan Halper outlined the Koch's latest scheme. Along with anti-tax crusader Grover Norquist, several major power companies and a national association representing conservative state legislators, the brothers are aiming to kill preferences for the burgeoning solar power industry that have been put into law in dozens of states.
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NEWS
March 11, 2001 | GARY KLEIN
La Jolla Bishop's 66, Oak Park 41--Lindsay Killus made 10 of 12 shots and finished with 24 points, and Brianna Winn added 17 to lead the Bishop's (24-6) in the Division IV victory at the Forum. Oak Park (25-6) made only three of 20 three-point shots.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Shan Li
Los Angeles has outstripped San Diego as the city with the most solar installations in the nation, one report says. By the end of 2013, Angelenos installed a cumulative total of 132 megawatts of solar power, according to a report from the Environment California Research & Policy Center. That is about one-third more than San Diego, which previously held the No. 1 spot. "It's been a long time coming," said Bernadette Del Chiaro, executive director of the California Solar Energy Industries Assn.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
Hawaii's love affair with rooftop solar energy has turned into a gold rush. In 2012, as many permits for new solar units were issued on the island of Oahu alone as in the entire state over the last decade. That, inevitably, has led to gridlock. Homeowners and businesses in some areas have been required to conduct expensive studies before hooking up new solar power to the electrical grid, which utility operators fear could become saturated with unpredictable do-it-yourself power.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The green trend is taking hold in the airline industry. United Airlines announced plans in June to buy 15 million gallons of lower-carbon, renewable jet fuel over a three-year period.  And Alaska Airlines is testing solar-powered passenger ramps. The new mobile ramps, used to get passengers on and off planes, are equipped with solar panels that power the batteries that drive the ramps' electric motors. Traditional mobile ramps and passenger stairs are powered by gasoline or diesel engines.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Dan Turner
Still skeptical about solar power -- and especially about the wisdom of installing panels on your own rooftop? One can hardly be blamed, given horror stories about the difficulties in getting assistance from local utilities such as the L.A. Department of Water and Power. Yet more and more Californians are doing it anyway -- because it's paying off. The California Public Utilities Commission, which tracks solar installations statewide, on Thursday updated its ticker to show that California has now installed 1.5 gigawatts of rooftop solar, roughly equivalent to what would be generated by three medium-sized coal-fired power plants, according to clean energy expert Michelle Kinman at Environment California.
OPINION
October 16, 2012
Should we save the desert tortoise, or plow over its habitat to build solar power plants that can help us save ourselves? It's a question that has arisen frequently in recent years as solar developers have flocked to California's Mojave Desert in search of generous federal incentives to turn the sun's heat into electricity, raising conflicts with conservationists and Native American tribes who think all this "progress" will ravage natural and...
HOME & GARDEN
August 27, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Abundant sunshine has made Southern California one of the brightest markets for residential solar power in the country. Some might say too bright. Encouraged by federal tax credits and a municipal rebate, so many Los Angeles residents sought to add rooftop solar panels at the start of the year that the Department of Water and Power had to suspend its Solar Incentive Program in April because of overwhelming demand and funding concerns. But on Thursday — at 10 a.m., to be precise — the DWP will relaunch the program, albeit with reduced rebates and a new online system to process applications.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Catherine Green
As Los Angeles launches into its solar buyback program between companies and the L.A. Department of Water and Power, one rooftop power producer is exploring a way to avoid depending on utilities altogether. Lyndon Rive, chief executive of San Mateo, Calif.-based SolarCity Corp., said in an interview this week that his rooftop solar company plans to roll out a system that would allow customers to generate power by panels during daylight hours and store the energy in battery packs at night.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
 Much if not all of the electric power once provided by the San Onofre nuclear power plant could be replaced with energy from non-fossil-fuel sources, says a proposed decision pending at the California Public Utilities Commission. The procurement plan written by an administrative law judge is expected to be debated and possibly voted upon next month by the five-member commission. Two principal partners in the shuttered plant, Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co., would be required to procure at least 600 megawatts of power from so-called preferred resources, which include wind and solar power, energy efficiency programs, electricity storage systems and locally generation from roof-top panels.
OPINION
January 17, 2014
Re “Solar power's outlook not as sunny,” Jan. 12 The article shows that the desert may not be the best place after all to generate solar power. As The Times points out, the move is away from large, industrial-scale desert plants and toward urban-based, mid-sized ones and rooftop solar: so-called distributed generation. Urban solar built over parking lots and on rooftops eliminates the environmental damage of desert solar - along with the need for environment impact statements, new transmission lines to bring the power to the cities and the costly lawsuits brought against desert plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | Julie Cart
Five years after the Obama administration's renewable energy initiative touched off a building boom of large-scale solar power plants across the desert Southwest, the pace of development has slowed to a crawl, with a number of companies going out of business and major projects canceled for lack of financing. Of the 365 federal solar applications since 2009, just 20 plants are on track to be built. Only three large-scale solar facilities have gone online, two in California and one in Nevada.
OPINION
January 4, 2014
Re "Power and memory," Editorial, Jan. 2 Your editorial - which supports both the preservation of the historical memory site of the World War II Manzanar detention camp for 10,000 Japanese Americans in the Owens Valley and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's plans to install a 1,200-acre solar array within sight of Manzanar to reduce California's reliance upon fossil fuels - is flawed by sins of omission and commission. On the one hand, the editorial omits consideration of any alternative sites that the DWP could utilize within its vast Owens Valley acreage to fulfill its mission to develop sources of sustainable energy.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California's electric utilities and other power sellers better hope that scientists and engineers come up with a surefire way to bottle lightning. That's a dramatic way of describing the more prosaic goal of finding a way to store large amounts of electricity, something that, up until now, did not seem practicable. On Thursday, the state Public Utilities Commission voted to create a formal "energy storage target" of 1,325 megawatts -- equivalent to the output of almost three modern, natural gas-fired power plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Past the neatly coordinated neighborhoods, the master-planned homes and immaculate lawns, on an old military runway in Irvine, a community that imagines life on a smaller scale has taken root. There, hundreds of college students from across the U.S., Canada and Europe have designed and built 19 solar-powered homes in a unique competition to see which will emerge as the most cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. Sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Solar Decathlon is a rigorous competition - the rule book is 68 pages long and regulates everything from acceptable average interior temperature (71 to 76 degrees Fahrenheit)
NATIONAL
August 15, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The White House began installing solar panels this week  on the first family's residence, finally making good on a pledge President Obama made almost three years ago. The installation follows a speech Obama made in June on tackling the causes of climate change and dealing with its effects. Administration officials announced in October 2010 that solar panels would be installed in the White House as part of an initiative to make government buildings more energy efficient, but the work was repeatedly delayed.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The green trend is taking hold in the airline industry. United Airlines announced plans in June to buy 15 million gallons of lower-carbon, renewable jet fuel over a three-year period.  And Alaska Airlines is testing solar-powered passenger ramps. The new mobile ramps, used to get passengers on and off planes, are equipped with solar panels that power the batteries that drive the ramps' electric motors. Traditional mobile ramps and passenger stairs are powered by gasoline or diesel engines.
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