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Solar Power Plant

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2009 | By Phil Willon
Nearly a century after Los Angeles drained Owens Lake by diverting its water to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, the city now hopes to generate solar energy on the dusty salt flats it left behind. The Department of Water and Power's board of commissioners Tuesday unanimously approved a renewable energy pilot project that would cover 616 acres of lake bed with solar arrays -- a possible precursor to a mammoth solar farm that could cover thousands of acres. City utility officials hope that, along with generating power for L.A., the solar panels would reduce the fierce dust storms that rise from the dry lake bed. To comply with federal clean air standards, the DWP must control the dust that has plagued the Owens Valley for decades.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
BrightSource Energy has suspended its application to build a $2.7-billion solar power plant at Hidden Hills, saying it needed to redesign the Inyo County project and the delay would lead to financial uncertainty. With the project nearing final stages of approval from the California Energy Commission, BrightSource considered adding power storage to the 500-megawatt facility. But doing so would trigger another round of time-consuming and costly engineering and environmental analyses.
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OPINION
October 26, 2010
Countering cancer Re " Breast cancer ? can we be too aware?" Opinion, Oct. 20 H. Gilbert Welch does a significant disservice to the ladies (and men) who will be attacked by this dreadful disease. The idea that "too much awareness" is somehow detrimental is so addle-headed that addressing it becomes almost impossible. My family has also been hit hard by breast cancer (as was Welch's, and I am glad his wife is well). My beautiful lady, Nancy, was killed by the disease in 2006.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The Obama administration continued its push to ramp up renewable energy projects on public land, approving three new projects on Wednesday, including what would become the largest solar power plant in the world. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced the approvals in San Francisco alongside Gov. Jerry Brown. The bulk of the coming renewables rush is happening in the state -- since 2009, more than 15 gigawatts of wind, solar, geothermal and transmission projects have been approved on federal land in California.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Brightsource Energy Inc. on Thursday cleared its final permitting hurdle for its proposed solar power plant. It expects to begin construction in the California desert in the next few weeks. The federal Bureau of Land Management approved the Oakland company's Ivanpah Electric Generating System project, set for remote San Bernardino County near the Nevada border. With a $1.37-billion loan guarantee from the Department of Energy, the project could be one of the first local commercial solar plants to break ground in years.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2010 | By Todd Woody
French nuclear energy giant Areva has jumped into the U.S. renewable energy market with the acquisition of Ausra Inc., a Mountain View, Calif., solar power plant start-up. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Areva executive Anil Srivastava said the sale price was in line with the $418 million that rival Siemens of Germany spent last year to acquire Solel Solar Systems, an Israeli solar power plant builder. That would be a decent payday for Ausra's investors, which include Silicon Valley venture capital firms Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and Khosla Ventures.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A Native American tribe has filed a lawsuit against the federal government in an attempt to block construction of Tessera Solar's Imperial Valley solar power plant in the Sonoran Desert. The 709-megawatt solar farm, planned for more than 6,000 acres of public land near El Centro, wrapped up its approval process in October. But the Quechan tribe alleged in a complaint against the Interior Department that the installation could damage "cultural and biological resources of significance.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER and SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of explosions and fire shut down electricity generation at the world's largest solar power plant near here Wednesday. Thick plumes of black smoke spiraled into the clear desert air when one of four natural gas-fired heaters used to back up the solar heating system exploded. A short time later, a second natural gas heater caught fire and exploded as the first of 75 firefighters and 25 pieces of equipment were arriving at the site, about 140 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 27, 1999 | Associated Press
A storage tank exploded at a solar power plant Friday, sending flames and billows of smoke into the sky for hours and forcing authorities to evacuate the immediate area. The fire, which broke out about 6 p.m., was still burning four hours later at the SEGS II power plant near Interstate 40 about seven miles east of Barstow, said San Bernardino County Fire Battalion Chief David McLees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2012 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to attracting business to California's eastern deserts, Inyo County is none too choosy. Since the 19th century the sparsely populated county has worked to attract industries shunned by others, including gold, tungsten and salt mining. The message: Your business may be messy, but if you plan to hire our residents, the welcome mat is out. So the county grew giddy last year as it began to consider hosting a huge, clean industry. BrightSource Energy, developer of the proposed $2.7-billion Hidden Hills solar power plant 230 miles northeast of Los Angeles, promised a bounty of jobs and a windfall in tax receipts.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
There is perhaps no greater American monument to the War in the Pacific than Ford Island in Hawaii's Pearl Harbor. The naval base there with its old hangars, runway and control tower - some still showing damage from the Japanese attack that brought the United States into World War II - is on the National Register of Historic Places. Dotted around the island's 450 acres are memorials to the battleships Arizona, Utah and Oklahoma, which were sunk. Docked near the Arizona's submerged hull is the Missouri, the legendary battlewagon and scene of Japan's formal surrender on Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Despite strong opposition from environmentalists, the state Assembly on Thursday approved controversial legislation that allows a solar energy developer to bypass local agencies in seeking to build a large-scale power plant in a valley that is home to desert tortoises, golden eagles and bighorn sheep. The nation's leading environmental groups see K Road Power's proposed 663-megawatt Calico Solar plant as one of the most ecologically damaging renewable energy projects in the California desert.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
As Republican lawmakers pound the Obama administration for pouring a half-billion dollars into now-bankrupt solar panel maker Solyndra, a much bigger federal government bet on green energy looks to be quietly paying off for California. Six large solar power plants to help the state meet its ambitious clean electricity goals are proceeding on schedule, according to their developers. Like Solyndra, these projects carry federal loan guarantees — $7 billion worth in total — which are considered key to attracting private investment in alternative energy.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Southern California Edison has signed contracts with two companies for the construction and operation of seven solar power plants in the state, including one that the utility said would be among the largest single solar photovoltaic installations in the U.S. The facilities, when completed by 2016, would add a total of 831 megawatts of electricity-generating capacity, enough to power 540,000 homes, the Rosemead utility said Monday. That represents a significant increase in Edison's ability to deliver power from the sun and other renewable sources.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A Native American tribe has filed a lawsuit against the federal government in an attempt to block construction of Tessera Solar's Imperial Valley solar power plant in the Sonoran Desert. The 709-megawatt solar farm, planned for more than 6,000 acres of public land near El Centro, wrapped up its approval process in October. But the Quechan tribe alleged in a complaint against the Interior Department that the installation could damage "cultural and biological resources of significance.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
An explosion and fire shut down electricity production at the world's largest solar power plant in the Mojave Desert near Barstow this morning. One of four natural-gas-fired heaters used as a backup system at the Harper Lake solar plant exploded as it was being brought up to full power. The cause of the explosion was unknown. No one was reported injured. The $230-million, 80-megawatt plant operated by Luz International Ltd. of Los Angeles was put on line Dec.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1993 | Jack Searles
Siemens Solar Industries of Camarillo has announced completion of a $4.5-million solar power plant to serve customers of Pacific Gas & Electric Co. at Kerman, about 10 miles west of Fresno. The 500-kilowatt plant, described as the largest of its kind, will deliver power to PG&E's grid during hot summer afternoons and at other peak demand periods. "It's a prototype installation that delivers power to a specific point where it's needed," said Siemens spokesman Mark Stimson.
OPINION
October 26, 2010
Countering cancer Re " Breast cancer ? can we be too aware?" Opinion, Oct. 20 H. Gilbert Welch does a significant disservice to the ladies (and men) who will be attacked by this dreadful disease. The idea that "too much awareness" is somehow detrimental is so addle-headed that addressing it becomes almost impossible. My family has also been hit hard by breast cancer (as was Welch's, and I am glad his wife is well). My beautiful lady, Nancy, was killed by the disease in 2006.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Brightsource Energy Inc. on Thursday cleared its final permitting hurdle for its proposed solar power plant. It expects to begin construction in the California desert in the next few weeks. The federal Bureau of Land Management approved the Oakland company's Ivanpah Electric Generating System project, set for remote San Bernardino County near the Nevada border. With a $1.37-billion loan guarantee from the Department of Energy, the project could be one of the first local commercial solar plants to break ground in years.
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