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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Storm clouds hovered over the San Fernando Valley, but businessman Jack Engel was smiling as he pointed to a row of solar inverters at one of two commercial warehouses he owns in Sun Valley. Power was being generated despite the weather, no problem. His problem, he said, has been the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. "I like the idea of solar, but unfortunately my experience is that the DWP doesn't support it," said Engel, who has run a small manufacturing firm on Pendleton Street for four decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2011 | By Alison Bell
Long before the age of Hollywood and Mickey's Magic Kingdom, one of the hottest tourist draws in Southern California involved a herd of scowling ostriches and a towering, solar-powered engine. The pairing may sound wacky, but at the turn of the 20th century, it kept the curious flocking to the San Gabriel Valley. According to Rick Thomas, author of "South Pasadena's Ostrich Farm," the attraction was the world's first successful commercial use of a solar-powered motor. First, the story of the ostriches: In 1886, businessman Edwin Cawston traveled to South Africa and acquired 50 ostriches with the goal of breeding them, Thomas said.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2011 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
In a nod to the growing popularity of sun-powered houses, Los Angeles-based KB Home said it was rolling out 10 new Southern California developments that would have solar panels incorporated as a standard feature for each property. The homes will be outfitted with six-panel photovoltaic solar systems built by SunPower Corp. The standard system will be capable of producing about 30% of daily energy use for an 1,800- to 2,000-square-foot home, said Steve Ruffner, president of KB Home's Southern California division.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California is poised to more than double its targeted electricity output from rooftop solar panels. The state Public Utilities Commission on Thursday tweaked its rules to authorize an increase in the number of residential, commercial and government buildings that can participate in a program that allows solar users to lower their electricity bills by getting credit for excess power sent back to the grid. The move raises the maximum total capacity of all the state's rooftop solar systems to about 5,200 megawatts from a current 2,400 megawatts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2012 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to attracting business to California's eastern deserts, Inyo County is none too choosy. Since the 19th century the sparsely populated county has worked to attract industries shunned by others, including gold, tungsten and salt mining. The message: Your business may be messy, but if you plan to hire our residents, the welcome mat is out. So the county grew giddy last year as it began to consider hosting a huge, clean industry. BrightSource Energy, developer of the proposed $2.7-billion Hidden Hills solar power plant 230 miles northeast of Los Angeles, promised a bounty of jobs and a windfall in tax receipts.
OPINION
March 8, 2012
Tortoise power Re " The solar desert: An uneasy coexistence ," March 4 I was utterly amazed, though not surprised, by the attempts to "save" the desert tortoise at such a tremendous expense of dollars, personnel, programs, sacrifices and concessions. There is a severe shortage of renewable clean energy on this planet. There are millions of children who go to bed hungry each day. There are millions of humans who do not have access to clean drinking water. But by all means let's have a private company spend in excess of $56 million to provide food, housing, medical care and security for the desert tortoise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
Democratic congressional candidate Anita Perez Ferguson announced her endorsement by the League of Conservation Voters Thursday while touring a solar power firm with former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt. After touring the Camarillo headquarters of Siemens Solar Industries, Babbitt, the league's president, said solar power is the type of renewable energy that environmental groups support.
REAL ESTATE
December 19, 2004 | From Time wire reports
California could have 1 million buildings producing solar energy by 2018, with half of all new homes powered by the sun, administration officials said as they outlined ways to meet one of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's more ambitious campaign promises. The goal is to create a self-sustaining solar industry in 10 years, making the zero-pollution power source so commonplace and cheap that costly incentives are no longer necessary, said Joe Desmond, Schwarzenegger's deputy secretary of Energy.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1993 | Jack Searles
Siemens Solar Industries of Camarillo has announced completion of a $4.5-million solar power plant to serve customers of Pacific Gas & Electric Co. at Kerman, about 10 miles west of Fresno. The 500-kilowatt plant, described as the largest of its kind, will deliver power to PG&E's grid during hot summer afternoons and at other peak demand periods. "It's a prototype installation that delivers power to a specific point where it's needed," said Siemens spokesman Mark Stimson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2008 | Gale Holland
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has announced a private-public partnership to bring solar power to 15 California State University campuses and the system's Long Beach headquarters. "California is going green and we are doing it first and we are doing it fast," Schwarzenegger said this week at a news conference at Cal State Dominguez Hills, according to a statement released by his office. "This partnership is a good deal for the state, the planet and our economy -- all at no cost to taxpayers."
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